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Inspection carried out on 21 August 2020

During an inspection looking at part of the service

Fleming Court is a 'care home'. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. Fleming Court accommodates a maximum of 69 older people, including people who live with dementia or a dementia related condition, in one purpose-built building.

We found the following examples of good practice:

• The provider and registered manager had plans in place for staff to follow a range of scenarios related to the pandemic, to keep people, staff and visitors safe. For example, the service could be divided into designated zones to help control any infection and people could be isolated in their own bedrooms or co-horted into areas.

• There was clear guidance for visitors to the service to follow to help reduce the risk of infection. Visitors were required to have their temperature taken, complete a COVID-19 assessment form, wear PPE and use designated hand washing areas. The registered manager provided relatives with information regarding what to expect during visits, PPE and national guidance.

• Staff were wearing PPE appropriately and there were PPE stations located throughout the service. Staff were able to change in designated areas into their uniforms and were provided with washbags for clothing to reduce the risk of infection.

• People were encouraged to stay in contact with relatives and friends via the telephone, video calls and visits through windows or in the garden area.

• The home environment was very clean and there were cleaning schedules that had been reviewed regularly in line with infection control principles.

• Risk assessments were in place for people, staff and visitors to help reduce identified risks related to the pandemic. These were regularly reviewed, and steps were taken to help keep everyone safe.

Inspection carried out on 21 November 2017

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced inspection carried out on 21 November 2017.

This was the first inspection of Fleming Court since it was registered with the Care Quality Commission in November 2016.

Fleming Court is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing and personal care as a single package under a contractual agreement with the local authority, health authority or the individual, if privately funded. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. Fleming Court accommodates a maximum of 69 older people, including people who live with dementia or a dementia related condition, in one purpose built building. At the time of inspection 34 people were using the service.

A registered manager was not in post. A relief manager was responsible for the day to day management of the service until a manager was appointed. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The atmosphere was lively and bustling and visitors told us they were made welcome to the service.

There were sufficient staff to provide safe and individual care to people. Staff knew about safeguarding vulnerable adults procedures. Staff were subject to robust recruitment checks. Arrangements for managing people’s medicines were safe. Appropriate processes were in place for the administration of medicines.

People told us their privacy, dignity and confidentiality were maintained. Staff understood the needs of people and care plans and associated documentation were clear and person centred. Risk assessments were in place and they accurately identified current risks to the person as well as ways for staff to minimise or appropriately manage those risks. People received a variety of food and drink.

People had access to health care professionals to make sure they received appropriate care and treatment. Staff followed advice given by professionals to make sure people received the care they needed. People told us staff were kind and caring and they felt comfortable with all the staff who supported them

Appropriate training was provided and staff were supervised and supported. People were able to make choices about aspects of their daily lives. They were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible, the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. Most areas of the building were well-designed to help people who lived with dementia to be aware of their surroundings and to remain involved.

A complaints procedure was available. People told us they would feel confident to speak to staff about any concerns if they needed to. The provider undertook a range of audits to check on the quality of care provided.

People had the opportunity to give their views about the service. There was regular consultation with people and/ or family members and their views were used to improve the service. People had access to an advocate if required.

Staff and relatives said communication was effective to ensure staff and relatives were kept up to date about any changes in people’s care and support needs and the running of the service.