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Davigdor Lodge Rest Home Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 11 February 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service: Davigdor Lodge Rest Home is a residential care home providing accommodation and support for up to 25 people with mental health conditions. At the time of the inspection there were 25 people living at the home.

People’s experience of using this service: The service met the characteristics for a good service in each of the key areas, more information is in the full report.

• People said they felt safe living at Davigdor Lodge Rest Home. One person said, “I get anxious sometimes but staff know how to calm me down, I feel safe here.”

• Risks to people were assessed and managed. Staff understood how to recognise and report safeguarding concerns. There were enough staff on duty and they had the knowledge and experience they needed to care for people safely. People received their medicines safely and there were systems to prevent and control infection. Incidents were recorded and changes were made to prevent further occurrences.

• Staff had received the support and training they needed to care for people’s needs. Staff described effective communication and good team work. Assessments and support plans guided staff in how to support people. People told us they enjoyed the food provided. One person said, “We have a choice and there’s plenty to eat and drink.” People were supported to access health care services when they needed them. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

• People said that staff were kind. One person told us, “They are all very caring and helpful.” Staff knew people well and had developed positive relationships with them. People were supported to express their views. Staff respected people’s privacy and dignity and encouraged people to be as independent as possible.

• People were supported in a person-centred way. Staff recognised changes in people’s needs and responded in a timely way to seek advise from health care professionals. There was a robust system for managing complaints. People told us they felt confident that any issues would be addressed.

• People and staff spoke highly of the management of the home. One person said, “The manager is doing a first class job.” There was visible leadership and staff understood their roles and responsibilities. Management systems were used to monitor and improve the quality of care. People and staff said they felt included in developments at the service and told us their ideas and views were welcomed. Staff worked effectively with other agencies.

For more details, please read the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection: Good- 29 June 2016

Why we inspected: This was a planned comprehensive inspection.

Follow up: Ongoing monitoring.

Inspection carried out on 29 June 2016

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place over two days on 29 June 2016 and 4 July 2016 and was unannounced. Davigdor Lodge Rest Home is a care home that provides accommodation and support for up to 25 people who have mental health needs. During the inspection there were 24 people living at the home. People’s ages ranged from 42 to 69 years old. The home provided care and support for people living with long term mental health conditions such as schizophrenia, depression and substance misuse.

The care home is situated in central Hove near to the Town Hall and local shops. Bus services are frequent and can be accessed at the end of the road. The building is comprised of two Victorian houses that have been linked internally to provide accommodation spread over five storeys. The floors are connected by stairs and there are bathrooms on each floor. Some people living at Davigdor Lodge have lived there for many years.

The home had a new manager who had been in post for just over three months. They were going through the process of becoming registered with CQC and at the time of the inspection they were not yet registered. Shortly after the inspection they were confirmed as the Registered Manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People spoke highly of the home and said that the Provider, the manager and the staff were all approachable and friendly. However, some aspects of care were not consistently effective. Where people had been assessed as being at risk of malnutrition and poor hydration records were not consistent and clear for staff to follow. This meant that people were at risk of not getting the support they needed with eating and drinking and the risk was not effectively monitored. This was identified as an area of practice in need of improvement.

Staff were working within the principles of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. However staff understanding of their responsibilities with regard to this legislation and guidance was inconsistent. This was identified as an area of practice in need of improvement.

People told us they felt safe living at Davigdor Lodge one person said, “The staff make sure we are all safe here.” Risks to individuals were assessed and managed and staff were clear about their responsibilities to keep people safe and to report any suspected abuse. People received their medicines safely from trained staff. Medicines were stored and managed appropriately.

There was a robust recruitment process in place and there were sufficient staff on duty to meet people’s needs. Staff told us they were well supported with regular supervision and team meetings. They said they had access to good training and they could ask for help at any-time. People were supported to access health care services when they needed to. One person said, “The staff make sure I don’t miss my appointments with the psychiatrist, and the nurse.”

People told us they enjoyed the food at Davigdor Lodge and people’s individual dietary needs and preferences were considered. One person said, “They are very helpful, if you fancy something different they will make it for you.”

People told us that staff were caring, and respectful and that they were happy living at Davigdor Lodge. One person said, “I enjoy living here, we have made it into our own home.” People’s privacy and dignity were respected. Staff knew people well and involved them in decisions about their care and support. A staff member said, “We ask people what they want, how they need us to support them and what we can change to support them better.”

Care and support plans were personalised and reflected people’s preferences. Staff were in the process of revie

Inspection carried out on 29 December 2014

During a routine inspection

We inspected Davigdor Lodge Rest Home on the 29 December 2014. Davigdor Lodge Rest Home is a family run mental health care home that provides support for up to 25 people. On the day of the inspection 24 people were living at the home. The age range varied from 32 to 70 years old. The home provided care and support for people living with past and present mental health needs, such as depression, schizophrenia and substance misuse related mental health needs.

The home is centrally located in Hove with good public transport links to the city centre. The central location enabled people to regularly access local bars and shops nearby and the seafront was a short walk away. Many people living at the home have lived there for many years. The provider also has good retention of staff and management. Throughout the inspection, people spoke highly of the home. One person told us, “I don’t want to ever leave.”

A registered manager was in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the last inspection in July 2014, we asked the provider to take action to make improvements in management of infection control, care and treatment, quality assurance of the home and the premises. An action plan was received from the provider which stated they would meet the legal requirements by 1 December 2014. At this inspection we found improvements had been made, but further areas for improvement were still identified.

People’s needs had been assessed and care plans developed. However, care plans and risk assessments did not always contain sufficient guidance to enable staff to provide safe and responsive care. Despite concerns with documentation, we saw that people consistently received the care they required. Staff members were clear on people’s individual healthcare and mental health needs, but we have made a recommendation for improvement in this area.

People’s medicines were stored safely and in line with legal regulations. People told us they received their medication on time, however, omissions in the recording of administration of medicines were identified. We have identified this as an area of practice that requires improvement.

Davigdor Lodge Rest Home was undergoing a rolling programme of maintenance work. This work was still on-going on the day of our inspection, and further work was required to ensure people lived in a safe environment.

A dedicated activities coordinator was in post and provided opportunities for social stimulation and interaction. However, they only worked one day a week. People commented this was not sufficient and they often found themselves with little to do. We have identified this as an area that requires improvement.

Incident and accidents were not consistently recorded or monitored for any emerging trends or patterns. The provider has been asked to make improvement in this area.

Staff received training that was relevant in supporting the needs of people living at Davigdor Lodge Rest Home. Staff received on-going support through handovers, staff meetings and supervisions. One staff member told us, “The training is great.”

Staff understood the needs of people and care was provided with kindness and compassion. People told us they felt confident in the skills of staff members. One person told us, “I rate them 10 out of 10.” People looked comfortable in the company of staff and management. It was clear staff and management had spent time getting to know people, their history, likes and dislikes.

People were treated with respect and dignity by staff. They were spoken with and supported in a sensitive, respectful and professional manner. Staff members respected people’s privacy and always knocked on their door before entering. Staff understood the importance of monitoring people’s mental health and well-being on a daily basis. Staff worked closely with healthcare professionals and was responsive to people’s changing needs.

People told us they felt safe living at Davigdor Lodge Rest Home. Staff had received safeguarding adults at risk training and staff were able to tell us what they would do if they had any concerns. Staff had received training on the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005, alongside Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards training (DoLS).

Inspection carried out on 22 July 2014

During a routine inspection

Our inspection team was made up of one adult social care inspector. We set out to answer our five key questions; is the service caring? Is the service responsive? Is the service safe? Is the service effective? Is the service well-led?

Below is a summary of what we found. The summary describes what people using the service and staff told us, our observations during the inspection and the records we looked at. At this inspection, we spoke with nine of the people who lived at the service and two care staff. We also spoke with the manager and service provider.

If you want to see the evidence supporting our summary please read the full report.

Is the service safe?

Care plans had been reviewed and were up to date. However, we found that people were not protected against the risks of unsafe and inappropriate care. This was because some areas of people�s care plans were not sufficiently detailed. This meant that there was insufficient guidance to allow staff to deliver safe and effective care that reflected the support required in people�s assessed needs. A compliance action has been set for this and the provider must tell us how they plan to improve.

People who used the service, staff and visitors were not protected against the risks of unsafe or unsuitable premises. Although some communal areas and the exterior of the service had recently been redecorated, we found that other areas required repair, renewal and redecoration. One person told us �They have done a lot, but there is still a lot to do�. People were not cared for in a safe and suitable environment because there was insufficient planning and activity to ensure that maintenance and remedial work was carried out when needed. A compliance action has been set for this and the provider must tell us how they plan to improve.

We looked around the service and found that some areas were not properly cleaned and were unhygienic. People were not protected against the risks of exposure to infection, because adequate cleaning had not taken place. A compliance action has been set for this and the provider must tell us how they plan to improve.

Staff files contained all of the information needed by the Health and Social Care Act. We found that the shortfalls highlighted at our last inspection had been addressed. This showed that the service had effective selection and recruitment procedures in place.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is required by law to monitor the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). This is where restrictions may be placed on some people to help keep them safe. While no DoLS applications had needed to be submitted, we found that suitable policies and procedures were in place. Relevant staff had been trained to understand when an application should be made and how to submit one.

Is the service effective?

People told us they were happy living at Davigdor Lodge Rest Home. One person told us �It suits me here, I�m happy as I am�. We saw that health care needs had been reviewed and specialist care needs, such as particular dietary requirements, had been identified and put into practice.

Is the service caring?

Care records contained personalised information which helped staff to know the people they supported. People told us that the staff treated them well, were kind and friendly. They said that their privacy was respected and their independence was encouraged. One person commented �I�m involved in my care as much as I want to be. I can always find staff it I want to talk about anything�. We saw that staff interacted well with the people that they supported and people appeared content.

Is the service responsive?

People�s needs had been assessed before they moved to Davigdor Lodge. This meant that the service had the skills and facilities to meet their identified needs. Records confirmed people�s preferences, interests, aspirations and diverse needs had been recorded and care and support had been provided that met their wishes. Regular monitoring of people�s health, associated risks and their social needs identified when particular measures were required to help keep people safe. We saw that, when identified, such measures were put in place. This meant that the service was responsive to people�s individual needs.

Is the service well-led?

The service had quality assurance systems intended to monitor and improve the service provided. However we identified shortfalls in infection control measures, care planning and the maintenance of the premises. This demonstrated that audit processes were not effective at this time because they had not identified the shortfalls highlighted. A compliance action has been set in relation to the quality assurance systems and the management of risks. The provider must tell us how they plan to improve.

Inspection carried out on 17 February 2014

During a routine inspection

We visited Davigdor Lodge for a day, when we spoke with three members of staff, and three people who lived in the home, as well as the manager and deputy manager.

People�s needs were assessed in detail before they moved into the home. A standard risk assessment was developed for each person, with any risks identified as medium or high leading to a support plan to manage the risk. Different parts of people�s support plans cross-referred as appropriate to their mental health support plan. There was evidence of close liaison with care coordinators based in the community and care records included people�s care programme approach plans.

People told us they were well aware of their support plans and felt involved in agreeing and reviewing them. A person living in the home told us �I feel in control of my life.� However, support plans did not show that all restrictions on activities were fully agreed with people, for example where particular arrangements were made to assist management of personal monies. Some support plans lacked specific information to guide staff.

The service identified that the ageing of people in the home meant physical care and mobility needs were becoming more acute for some people. A wet room had been provided for people who found use of a bathroom too difficult. The home liaised with health professionals in the community. People benefited from six-monthly reviews with their GP.

Training records showed all staff undertook annual refresher training in understanding indicators of possible abuse and how to use local safeguarding procedures. Where people were assessed as posing risks of self-harm, suicide, self-neglect or behaviours others could experience as difficult, risk management strategies were in place.

A person living in the home told us they liked the certainty of how their medicines were administered and they saw how staff recorded what they gave. All members of the care staff received training in handling medicines. There was a monthly audit of medicines handling and lessons were learnt and acted on when rare medicine errors occurred.

We looked at the recruitment records for three staff members who had been recruited in the year prior to our visit. They did not demonstrate that all vetting procedures were completed before people started to work unsupervised in the home. We are asking the provider to take action to ensure recruitment procedures are made safe.

The management were well informed about how people experienced the service. As well as plentiful informal conversation within the daily life of the home, arranged meetings took place for people who lived in the home. There was evidence matters affecting the home were discussed widely and the views of people living in the home, and staff, influenced how the home was run.

Inspection carried out on 18 March 2013

During a routine inspection

During our inspection at Davigdor Lodge Rest Home we spoke to the deputy manager, the registered manager, a team leader, the activities co-ordinator and two care workers. We also took information from other sources which included a satisfaction survey and resident meeting minutes.

All the staff that we spoke to had formed close professional relationships with the people who used the service. The premises were clean and the atmosphere was relaxed and homely. The deputy manager told us �I tell the residents here that it is their home. We work for them. I believe in positive risk taking and the residents should do what they want to do as long as we manage the risk�.

The people we spoke with told us they were happy with the care they had received and with the staff team. One person who used the service told us �The staff are very good. They always pop in to see if I�m alright. They are always helpful. I can�t complain�. Another person told us �The staff always do their best for me. I�m very happy here�.

Staff we spoke with had a good understanding of the support needs of the people who used the service. One member of staff we spoke with told us �We provide a good level of care. We try and meet all the residents� needs in every way. I look at the care plans on every shift I do. I read all the notes and handover notes�. Staff we spoke with felt supported in their role and understood the signs of abuse and how to raise any safeguarding concerns.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)