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Choice South Coast (Supported Living) Good

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 22 March 2018

During a routine inspection

Choice South Coast (Supported Living) is a domiciliary care service registered to provide personal care. The service provides personal care and support to adults of all ages living in their own homes within the West Sussex area. It provides a service to people with a learning disability who may also have a physical disability and people living with sensory impairment.

Choice South Coast provides care and support to people living in a 'supported living' setting, so that they can live as independently as possible. People's care and housing are provided under separate contractual agreements. CQC does not regulate premises used for supported living; this inspection looked at people's personal care and support.

The service supports some people on a 24 hour basis and others who may require support with personal care needs at specific times of the day and/or night. At the time of this inspection, three out of a total of 21 people received support with their personal care needs from the agency.

The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. However the registered manager was not available during our visit.

At the last inspection, the service was rated Good. However, it was Requires Improvements in Effective. At this inspection we found the service remained Good, including Good in Effective.

Why the service is rated Good.

People now received effective care from staff who had the skills and knowledge to meet their needs. Staff meetings, one to one supervision of staff practice and appraisals of performance were now undertaken and meetings documented. Staff without formal care qualifications completed the Care Certificate (a nationally recognised training course for staff new to care). Staff said the Care Certificate training looked at and discussed the Equality and Diversity policy of the company.

People were given the choice of meals, snacks and drinks they enjoyed while maintaining a healthy diet. Staff monitored people's health and well-being and made sure they had access to other healthcare professionals according to their individual needs.

The service remained safe. When asked, people who were able to, told us the service they received was safe. People felt safe with the staff who supported them. Family members gave positive feedback about the staff, the safety of people and how staff related to their loved ones. Comments from relatives included; “Amazing service” and “Wouldn’t want my relative to use anyone else.”

People’s medicines were managed safely. People were protected from abuse because staff knew what action to take if they suspected someone was being abused, mistreated or neglected. People had their needs met by suitable numbers of staff. Staff were recruited safely and checks carried out with the disclosure and barring service (DBS) ensured they were suitable to work with vulnerable adults.

People were enabled and supported to lead fulfilling, independent and active lives. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People’s equality and diversity was respected and people were supported in the way they wanted to be. People's human rights were protected because the registered manager and staff

Inspection carried out on 12 July 2016

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 12 July 2016 and was announced.

Choice South Coast (Supported Living) provides personal care in a setting called ‘supported living’ where people are enabled to live as independently as possible in their own homes with additional support. There were four people aged 51 to 73 years who received personal care at the time of our inspection. These people also received support with activities and independent living skills. A further 13 people were supported with activities and independent living skills but did not receive personal care. The service specialises in the care of adults with a learning disability.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Staff were supported in their work but supervision and appraisal of staff was inconsistent and was highlighted by the local authority commissioning team as an area the service needed to improve on.

Staff were trained in adult safeguarding procedures and knew what to do if they considered people were at risk of harm or if they needed to report any suspected abuse. People and their relatives said the staff provided safe care.

Care records showed any risks to people were assessed and there was guidance of how those risks should be managed to prevent any risk of harm.

Sufficient numbers of staff were deployed to meet people’s needs.

People received their medicines safely.

Staff had access to a range of relevant training courses, including nationally recognised qualifications.

The CQC monitors the operation of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) which applies to care homes. Staff were trained in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). The registered manager knew the responsibilities of assessing people’s capacity and worked with local authority professionals when there was an issue regarding people’s capacity to consent to their care and treatment.

People were supported with shopping and the preparation of meals where this was needed.

People’s health care needs were assessed, monitored and recorded. Referrals for assessment and treatment were made when needed and people received regular health checks.

Staff had positive working relationships with people and were observed to have a good rapport with them. Staff demonstrated they had a caring attitude, were concerned about people’s well-being and knew the importance of treating people with dignity.

Care was provided to people based on their individual needs which we call person centred care. People’s preferences and individual needs were acknowledged in the assessment of their needs and in how care was provided.

People were supported to attend a range of activities, which included employment, hobbies, social events, holidays and trips to the cinema.

The service had a complaints procedure, which people and their relatives said they were aware of. People said their views were listened to and a relative said they were satisfied how a complaint they made was responded to.

People and their relatives’ views were sought as part of the service’s quality assurance process. The service promoted people and their families to take part in decision making.

There were a number of systems for checking the safety and effectiveness of the service such as regular audits.

We found a breach of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of this report.