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Inspection carried out on 22 September 2017

During a routine inspection

Bluebird Care (Barking and Dagenham) is a domiciliary care agency providing support with personal care to people living in their own homes. At the time of inspection 52 people were using the service. At the previous inspection of this service in August 2015 it was rated as Good. We made one requirement because the service had failed to notify the Care Quality Commission of allegations of abuse. During this inspection we found this issue had been addressed and the service remained Good.

The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

There were enough staff working at the service to meet people’s needs and robust staff recruitment procedures were in place. Appropriate safeguarding procedures were in place and people told us they felt safe using the service. Risk assessments provided information about how to support people in a safe manner. Medicines were managed safely.

Staff received training and supervision to support them in their role. People were able to make choices for themselves where they had the capacity to do so and the service operated within the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Where the service supported people with meal preparation people told us they were able to choose what they ate and drank. People were supported to access relevant health care professionals.

People told us they were treated with respect and that staff were caring. Staff had a good understanding of how to promote people’s privacy, independence and dignity.

People’s needs were assessed before they began using the service. Care plans were in place which set out how to meet people’s individual needs and these were subject to review. The service had a complaints procedure in place and people knew how to make a complaint.

Staff and people spoke positively about the registered manager. The service had various quality assurance and monitoring systems in place, which included seeking the views of people on the running of the service.

Inspection carried out on 14, 17 and 18 August 2015

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place over three days on the 14, 17 and 18 August 2015 and was announced. The service was last inspected in December 2013 and was meeting all of the standards we looked at during that inspection.

The service is registered with the Care Quality Commission to provide support with personal care to adults and children living in their own homes. At the time of our inspection 50 adults were using the service. The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The registered manager was on a period of extended leave at the time of our visit and the nominated individual was taking responsibility for the day to day management of the service.

The provider did not always notify the Care Quality Commission of allegations of abuse. This was a breach of the Care Quality Commission (Registration) Regulations 2009. You can see what action we have asked the provider to take at the end of this report.

The provider had safeguarding and whistleblowing procedures in place. Staff undertook training about safeguarding adults. Risk assessments were in place which included information about how to manage and reduce risks. Staff told us they had enough time to provide people with support in line with their care plans. Systems were in place for the safe management of medicines.

Staff undertook training to support them to meet people’s assessed needs. People were able to consent to their care and staff understood the implications of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. This is law which protects people who may lack the capacity to make some decisions for themselves. Where people were supported with food preparation they were able to choose what they ate. The service worked with other agencies to promote people’s health and wellbeing.

People and their relatives told us they were treated with respect and that staff were caring. Staff had a good understanding of how to support people in a way that promoted their dignity.

The service carried out an assessment of people’s needs and care plans were in place providing information about how to meet people’s individual needs in a personalised manner. People knew how to make a complaint and complaints were responded to appropriately.

People relatives and staff told us they found the management of the service to be helpful and supportive. The service had various quality assurance and monitoring systems in place. Some of these involved seeking the views of people that used the service.

Inspection carried out on 13 December 2013

During a routine inspection

People we spoke with told us that staff at Bluebird Care Barking and Dagenham respected their privacy, dignity and independence. One person told us �they treat me well, they look after me�. Other people told us that they were able to give their opinions about how they or their relatives were treated and cared for and that they were listened to.

We found that people were involved in making decisions about their own treatment and care and that care was planned and delivered according to assessed need. One person said �they (staff) are very competent�. A relative said �I am happy with the care that X (relative) is receiving�.

There were processes in place to protect people from potential abuse. Staff recruitment procedures were in place which included staff having to supply employment references and undertaking a Disclosure and Baring Service (DBS) check. A DBS check is a check carried out to see if the person had any criminal convictions of if they were on any list that bars them from working with children or vulnerable adults. The service had a complaints procedure in place. This was provided in a format that met people�s needs. We were told that no complaints had been received by the service in the past year.