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Diverse Abilities Plus - Supported Living Good

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

Reports


Review carried out on 9 September 2021

During a monthly review of our data

We carried out a review of the data available to us about Diverse Abilities Plus - Supported Living on 9 September 2021. We have not found evidence that we need to carry out an inspection or reassess our rating at this stage.

This could change at any time if we receive new information. We will continue to monitor data about this service.

If you have concerns about Diverse Abilities Plus - Supported Living, you can give feedback on this service.

Inspection carried out on 1 October 2018

During a routine inspection

Diverse Abilities Plus provides care and support to 37 people with a learning an or physical disabilities living in 22 ‘supported living’ settings, so that they can live in their own home as independently as possible. People’s care and housing are provided under separate contractual agreements. CQC does not regulate premises used for supported living; this inspection looked at people’s personal care and support.

The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

At our last inspection in March 2016 we rated the service good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

People were supported by staff who understood the risks they faced and how to support them to reduce these. Staff understood how to identify and report abuse and were confident in their role as advocates for people when this was appropriate. Staff supported people to take medicines safely.

People were supported by skilled and caring staff who worked to ensure they lived their life the way they chose. Communication styles and methods were considered and staff supported people to understand the choices available to them.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and shared lives carers supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. Staff supported people to understand the choices available to them in ways they could easily understand. People led full and active lives in their homes and in the community.

People, relatives and professionals told us they could raise any concerns and these were addressed appropriately.

The service was well-led and there were effective quality assurance systems in place to assess, monitor and improve the quality and safety of the service people received.

Further information is in the detailed findings below

Inspection carried out on 7 March 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection was announced and took place on 7,8,10 and 11 March 2016. We told the provider two days before our visit that we would be coming to ensure that the people we needed to talk to would be available.

Diverse Abilities Plus Limited provides a supported living service for people with a learning disability, autistic spectrum disorder, older people, physical disability and younger adults. The service was supporting 38 people in 21 supported living properties. This is where people receive personal care and support in their own properties, some of which are shared with other people.

There was a registered manager in place and they had worked at the service since February 2014. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service and has the legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the law; as does the provider.

At our last inspection in July 2014 we identified some areas for improvement. This was because staff had made some decisions on behalf of people because they were not able to make these themselves. Some people did not have their mental capacity assessed, and decisions made in their best interests were not recorded as they should have been as directed by the Mental Capacity Act. There were safe systems in place to safely manage and administer medicines for most people. However, we found that one person did not receive one of their medicines as prescribed on two occasions. In addition we found one person’s dietary plan was not being followed and there was no system for recording or monitoring their weight. This was important because the person was at risk because they had complex health and dietary needs.

At this inspection we found the improvements identified at the last inspection had been made.

Some of the people we visited had complex needs and were not able to tell us about their experiences. We saw that those people and two people who spoke with us were happy and relaxed with staff. Relatives told us they were satisfied with the service their family members received and overall they did not raise any major concerns with us.

People received care and support in a personalised way. Staff knew people well and understood their needs and the way they communicated. We found that people received the health, personal and social care support they needed.

People’s medicines were managed safely and people received their medicines as prescribed.

Two people told us they felt safe and other people were relaxed with staff which indicated they were comfortable with staff. Staff knew how to recognise any signs of abuse and how they could report any allegations. Learning from any safeguarding investigations was shared with staff and actions taken to minimise any further incidents.

Any risks to people’s safety were assessed and managed to minimise risks. We saw people were supported to take part and try new activities and experiences in their homes and in the community.

Staff were caring and treated people with dignity and respect. People and staff had good relationships. People had access to the local community and had individual activities provided. People’s important relationships with their relatives were supported and maintained.

Staff received an induction, core training and some specialist training so they had the skills and knowledge to meet people’s needs. Staff felt they were well supported by the management team.

People knew how to raise concerns or complaints. People and relatives were regularly consulted.

The culture within the service was personalised and open. There was a clear management structure and staff and people felt comfortable talking to the managers about any issues and were sure that any concerns would be addressed. There were systems in place to monitor the safety and quality of the service provided.

Inspection carried out on 21, 22 July 2014

During a routine inspection

We carried out this inspection under Section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 as part of our regulatory functions. This inspection was planned to check whether the provider is meeting the legal requirements and regulations associated with the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and to pilot a new inspection process being introduced by CQC which looks at the overall quality of the service.

The inspection was announced. We told the provider two days before our visit that we would be coming to ensure that the people we needed to talk to would be available.

There was a registered manager in place and they had worked at the service for five months. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service and has the legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the law; as does the provider.

Diverse Abilities Plus Limited provides a supported living service for people with a learning disability, autistic spectrum disorder, older people, physical disability and younger adults. The service was supporting 35 people in 17 supported living properties. This is where people receive personal care and support in their own properties, some of which are shared with other people.

Some of the people we visited had complex needs and were not able to tell us their experiences. We saw that those people and the other people we spoke with were happy and relaxed with staff.

Staff had made some decisions on behalf of people because they were not able to make these themselves. Some people did not have their mental capacity assessed, and decisions made in their best interests were not recorded as they should have been as directed by the Mental Capacity Act. This was an area for improvement.

There were safe systems in place to safely manage and administer medicines for most people. However, we found that one person did not receive one of their medicines as prescribed on two occasions. This was an area for improvement.

People received care and support in a personalised way. Staff knew people well and understood their needs and the way they communicated. We found that people received the health, personal and social care support they needed. However, we found there was no system for recording or monitoring one person's weight. This was important because the person was at risk because they had complex health and dietary needs.  This was an area for improvement.

One person told us they felt safe and other people were relaxed with staff which may have indicated they were comfortable with staff. Four relatives we spoke with said people were safe.  Staff knew how to recognise any signs of abuse and how they could report any allegations.

Any risks to people’s safety were assessed and managed to minimise risks. We saw people were supported to take part and try new activities and experiences in their homes and in the community.

People, professionals and relatives gave positive feedback about staff employed by Diverse Abilities Plus but they raised concerns about the use of agency staff and the impact this had on the service people received. The registered manager had recruited more staff to reduce the agency use and had made sure regular agency staff were used where possible. 

Equipment was maintained and serviced as needed. People told us equipment was repaired promptly.

Staff were caring and treated people with dignity and respect. People and staff had good relationships. People had access to the local community and had individual activities provided.

Staff received an induction, core training and some specialist training so they had the skills and knowledge to meet people’s needs.

People and their relatives knew how to raise concerns or complaints. People and relatives were regularly consulted by the provider using surveys and meetings.

The culture within the service was personalised and open. There was a clear management structure and staff, relatives and people felt comfortable talking to the managers about any issues and were sure that any concerns would be addressed. There were systems in place to monitor the safety and quality of the service provided.