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Portsdown Group Practice Good Also known as Cosham Park House

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 9 October 2015

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced focussed desk top inspection of Cosham Park Avenue Surgery on 9 October 2015. Overall the practice is rated as good.

Our previous inspection in January 2015 had found the practice was good overall. We found that the practice required improvement in the Safe domain due to breaches of regulations relating to safe delivery of services. The practice was good for Effective, Caring and Responsive and Well Led services.

We followed up on our inspection of January 2015 to check that action had been taken to meet the minimum standards. We have not revisited Cosham Park Surgery as part of this review because they were able to demonstrate that they were meeting the standards without the need for a visit.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows:

  • Risk assessments related to the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) were being carried out effectively and all cleaning procedures were robust enough to ensure control of infections in the practice.
  • There was an open and transparent approach to safety and an effective system in place for reporting and recording significant events.
  • Risks to patients were assessed and well managed.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection carried out on 15 January 2015

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Portsdown Group Practice, Cosham Park Avenue Surgery 15 January 2015. Overall the practice is rated as good.

Specifically, we found the practice to be good for providing well-led, effective, caring and responsive services. It was also good for providing services to older people, people with long term conditions, families, children and young people, working age people, people whose circumstances may make them vulnerable and people experiencing poor mental health. It required improvement for providing safe services.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows:

Staff understood and fulfilled their responsibilities to raise concerns, and to report incidents and near misses. Information about safety was recorded, monitored, appropriately reviewed and addressed.

Risks to patients were assessed and well managed, with the exception of those relating to Legionella.

Patients’ needs were assessed and care was planned and delivered following best practice guidance. Staff had received training appropriate to their roles and any further training needs had been identified and planned for.

Patients said they were treated with compassion, dignity and respect and they were involved in their care and decisions about their treatment.

Patients said they found it easy to make an appointment with a named GP and that there was continuity of care, with urgent appointments available the same day.

There was a clear leadership structure and staff felt supported by management. The practice proactively sought feedback from staff and patients, which it acted on.

We saw one area of outstanding practice.

The practice had a duty GP each day who answered the phones and was joined by two further GPs between 9.00am and 9:30am. The GPs triaged the calls dealing over the phone, giving general advice, booking urgent appointments or directing patients to the nurse practitioner.

However, there were also areas of practice where the provider needs to make improvements.

Importantly, the provider must:

Ensure risk assessments related to the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) are carried out effectively and all cleaning procedures are robust enough to ensure control of infections in the practice.

The practice should :

Review the policy, recording and analysis in relation to comments and complaints.

Review disposal of sharps boxes and security of external waste bins.

Discuss clinical audits fully with relevant staff members.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Intelligent Monitoring

We use our system of intelligent monitoring of indicators to direct our resources to where they are most needed. Our analysts have developed this monitoring to give our inspectors a clear picture of the areas of care that need to be followed up.

Together with local information from partners and the public, this monitoring helps us to decide when, where and what to inspect.


CQC Insight

These reports bring together existing national data from a range of indicators that allow us to identify and monitor changes in the quality of care outside of our inspections. The data within the reports do not constitute a judgement on performance, but inform our inspection teams. Our judgements on quality and safety continue to come only after inspection and we will not make judgements on data alone.