• Care Home
  • Care home

Phoenix House

Overall: Good

124 Crowstone Road, Westcliff On Sea, Essex, SS0 8LQ (01702) 337057

Provided and run by:
Newhaven Care Limited

The provider of this service changed. See old profile

All Inspections

5 May 2022

During a monthly review of our data

We carried out a review of the data available to us about Phoenix House on 5 May 2022. We have not found evidence that we need to carry out an inspection or reassess our rating at this stage.

This could change at any time if we receive new information. We will continue to monitor data about this service.

If you have concerns about Phoenix House, you can give feedback on this service.

18 December 2020

During an inspection looking at part of the service

Phoenix House is a residential care home providing personal care and accommodation to people with learning disabilities or autism. The service can support up to nine people. At the time of inspection, nine people were being supported by the service.

We found the following examples of good practice.

A visitors protocol was in place and everyone was temperature tested, completed hand disinfection prior to entering the home and completed a declaration of health.

People who came into communal areas were monitored by staff and all communal areas cleaned thoroughly after use. Staff actively encouraged people to be occupied in their own rooms throughout the day whilst isolating.

The registered manager was pro-active in following recommendations from the local authority. Infection control champions supported the registered manager to ensure infection control practices met required standards.

The service used people's individual communication methods in its approach to supporting people with learning disabilities to understand why the pandemic meant changes to their day to day lives.

The registered manager told us that the staff team has been consistent and they are proud of their efforts to keep people safe.

3 January 2020

During a routine inspection

About the service

Phoenix House is a residential care home providing personal care and accommodation to people with learning disabilities or autism. The service can support up to nine people. At the time of inspection, nine people were being supported by the service.

Since our last inspection in November 2018, the service had registered to provide personal care and support to people in their own homes. At the time of inspection, only one person was using this service; they were not receiving personal care. CQC only inspects where people receive personal care. This is help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also consider any wider social care provided.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

The service was a large home. It was registered for the support of up to nine people. Eight people were using the service. This is larger than current best practice guidance. However. the size of the service having a negative impact on people was mitigated by the building design fitting into the residential area and the other large domestic homes of a similar size. There were deliberately no identifying signs, intercom, industrial bins or anything else outside to indicate it was a care home. Staff were also discouraged from wearing anything that suggested they were care staff when coming and going with people.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

Systems were in place to safeguard people from harm, including risk of abuse. Medicines were managed safely. The maintenance of the service had improved since our last inspection to help keep people safe and to prevent the spread of infection. Safe recruitment procedures were in place including pre-employment checks. The service learnt from accidents and incidents to provide safe care and support.

Staff received training, supervision and appraisal to fulfil their role and responsibilities. The service worked with health and social care professionals to ensure people’s nutritional needs and health care needs were met. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were treated in a caring manner by staff. Where possible, people and their relatives were involved in the planning and review of their care. Staff treated people with respect and dignity and promoted their independence.

People received person centred care. They were supported to follow their interests and hobbies and with accessing the local community. People received information in accessible formats. There was a complaints procedure in place and relatives told us they felt any concerns would be listened to and acted upon. We have made a recommendation about end of life care.

Quality assurance systems were in place to monitor the quality of the service provided. Without exception relatives told us they would recommend the service to others.

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection and update

The last rating for this service was requires improvement (published 4 January 2019) and there was one breach of regulation. The provider completed an action plan after the last inspection to show what they would do and by when to improve. At this inspection, we found improvements had been made and the provider was no longer in breach of regulations.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

27 November 2018

During a routine inspection

This comprehensive unannounced inspection was carried out on the 27 and 30 November 2018.

This was the first inspection of the service since it was registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in November 2017 when it changed ownership.

The service is a 'care home'. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing and/or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided and both were looked at during this inspection.

Phoenix House is registered to support up to nine people. On the date of our inspection, nine people, with diverse complex needs such as learning disabilities, autism and limited communication abilities were being supported by the service.

The service embraced the values which underpin the Registering the Right Support. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

The service has a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated regulations about how the service is run.

Improvements were required to ensure the risks to people’s health and safety within the general environment were managed safely to mitigate the risk of potential harm and infection.

There were sufficient numbers of staff to meet people’s individual care and support needs. Effective recruitment procedures were in place to protect people from the risk of avoidable harm. Staff understood their responsibilities in relation to keeping people safe from harm and abuse and the actions to take should they have concerns. Systems were in place for the safe management of medicines.

Staff felt supported and valued and were clear on their roles and responsibilities. People are supported to have maximum choice and control over their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. People were supported to access health and social care services. People’s dietary needs were met by staff.

People were treated with kindness, compassion, dignity and respect by a consistent staff team. Staff knew people well and were sensitive to their individual care and support needs. They were committed to supporting people to live fulfilled and meaningful lives. People’s independence was promoted and, where possible, they were encouraged to do as much as they could for themselves. People were supported to maintain relationships with friends and families.

Care plans were person centred and contained information and guidance to enable staff to support people in line with their preferences. Care was regularly reviewed to ensure they reflected people’s current needs. People were supported to pursue their interests and hobbies.

Although, the registered manager and staff were committed to providing good quality care, improvements were required to ensure the systems and processes in place to monitor the quality of the service and drive improvements were robust and met with regulatory requirements. The service encouraged feedback on the service provided to support continuous improvement.

We found one breach of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of this report.