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Lodge Group Care UK Limited Good

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 6 November 2018

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 6 November 2018 and was announced. At our last inspection in March 2016, we found the provider was meeting the regulations we inspected and the service was rated Good. At this inspection, we found that the service continued to be rated Good.

Lodge Group Care provides domiciliary care to people in their own homes within the London Borough of Havering. Not everyone using Lodge Group Care receives regulated activity; the CQC only inspects the service being received by people provided with ‘personal care’; help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also take into account any wider social care provided. At the time of this inspection there were 165 people using the service.

There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were safeguarded from the risk of abuse as the provider had systems to identify the possibility of abuse and stop it occurring. Staff understood how to safeguard the people they supported.

Staffing levels were managed and planned to ensure consistency and staff who were familiar to people at the service. There was an effective recruitment procedure in place.

People’s needs and risks were assessed and care and support was planned and delivered in line with their individual care plan. The provider ensured people were supported safely. Where people needed specific support or care, we saw evidence that this was delivered in accordance with people's needs.

Care records demonstrated that when there had been changes in people’s needs outside agencies had been involved to make sure they received the correct care and support.

People received their medicines as prescribed and in accordance to their wishes.

Staff had a good understanding of the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. People who used this service were able to make choices with regard to their daily lives.

Care and support was delivered in a safe way by staff who had received appropriate training. Staff were supported in their roles through one to one meetings and appraisal of their work.

People were encouraged to do as much for themselves as possible. Records confirmed people’s preferences, interests, aspirations and diverse needs had been recorded. Staff were knowledgeable about the people they cared for. People’s privacy and dignity were respected.

Where requested people were provided with sufficient food and drink and their individual nutrition needs were well supported.

There were systems in place to monitor how the service was run to ensure people received a quality service. The service sought feedback from people who used the service and their relatives, and we saw that this was acted upon. Where shortfalls or concerns were raised these were addressed. Regular audits and checks were also undertaken to ensure the service was run well.

People and their relatives could raise any concern and felt confident these would be addressed promptly. The provider took account of complaints and comments to improve the service.

There were clear lines of responsibility and accountability within the management structure and staff had a good understanding of the ethos of the service. Records relevant to the management of the service were accurate and fit for purpose.

People who used the service, their representatives as well as staff all commented positively about how the service was run, about its leadership and the culture within the service.

Inspection carried out on 9 March 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 9 March 2016 and was announced. The registered manager was given 48 hours’ notice because the location provides a domiciliary care service. This was to ensure that members of the management team and staff were available to talk to. At our last inspection in June 2013 we found the provider was meeting the regulations we inspected. The inspection was carried out by one inspector.

Lodge Group Care provides domiciliary care to people in their own homes within the London Borough of Havering. At the time of this inspection there were around 100 people using the service.

There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People using the service told us they felt safe when staff visited them. Staff had completed safeguarding training and knew what action they should take and how to report any concerns they had.

People had risk assessments in place. Where risks had been identified there were plans to manage them effectively. There was an accident policy and a contingency plan in place to ensure the service could continue in the event of an emergency.

Recruitment checks ensured that people were protected from the risk of being cared for by unsuitable staff. There was sufficient staff to provide people’s care.

Staff had been trained in a variety of areas and were knowledgeable about their roles and responsibilities. Systems were in place to support them and monitor their work.

We found medicines were managed safely and staff were trained to administer them as they were prescribed. People were supported to maintain nutritional and fluid intake. Staff treated people with dignity and respect and promoted their independence.

The provider acted in accordance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA), where people lacked the capacity to consent to their care relevant guidance had been followed.

Care plans were detailed, specific to the person and reflected people’s choices and preferences. People were involved in planning their care and were supported by external health professionals to maintain their health and wellbeing.

The service had a complaints procedure in place. People, their relatives and staff knew how to complain. Where complaints were made they were investigated and actions taken in response.

Quality assurance systems were in place to monitor the quality of the service, such as surveys, audits and spot checks.

Inspection carried out on 5 June 2013

During an inspection looking at part of the service

People who use the service were protected from the risk of abuse, because the provider had taken reasonable steps to identify the possibility of abuse and prevent abuse from happening. During our previous inspection in March 2013 we found that the service had not kept accurate financial records for one of the people it supports when undertaking shopping errands on their behalf.

During this inspection we found that the provider had implemented a new process to ensure that financial records were accurate and supervised. The manager told us that all staff had been updated on this process and advised of the importance of keeping good records.

Inspection carried out on 15 March 2013

During a routine inspection

People and their relatives expressed their views and were involved in making decisions about their care and treatment. Staff we spoke with were aware of people�s specific care needs and their likes and dislikes. Relatives told us they were happy with the care provided. One person said, �they have been amazing, absolutely amazing. They know how to look after me, they are like friends�. Another said, "the carers are absolutely perfect�.

People who use the service were not protected from the risk of abuse, because the provider had not taken reasonable steps to identify the possibility of financial abuse and prevent it from happening.

People told us they had no concerns with the way staff supported them to take medication. Staff told us they had been trained on how to support people in using medicines. Staff we spoke to had a good knowledge of how to support people and the correct procedures to follow.

There were enough qualified, skilled and experienced staff to meet people�s needs. We found that the service has undertaken recent training for staff key areas. The service had undertaken an assessment to ensure it has enough staff to look after people.

People who use the service, their representatives and staff were asked for their views about their care and treatment and they were acted on. We found written evidence in care plans that the manager of the service undertook �spot checks� on the quality of service.