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Rose Valley Medical Centre Good

Reports


Review carried out on 8 July 2021

During a monthly review of our data

We carried out a review of the data available to us about Rose Valley Medical Centre on 8 July 2021. We have not found evidence that we need to carry out an inspection or reassess our rating at this stage.

This could change at any time if we receive new information. We will continue to monitor data about this service.

If you have concerns about Rose Valley Medical Centre, you can give feedback on this service.

Inspection carried out on 8 September 2020

During an inspection looking at part of the service

At the inspection on 8 May 2019 we found there was no system or process to ensure that children attending the service were accompanied by an adult with parental responsibility. We reviewed this as part of this focussed inspection in September 2020 and found this issue had been addressed.

We also told the provider they should review and improve systems and processes for quality improvement including audits and improve governance processes, specifically related to reviewing the service’s written policies and procedures. These issues did not amount to breaches of the regulations. We checked these areas as part of this focussed inspection and found improvements had been made.

The provider provided examples of audits they had carried out and corresponding changes made to the service. For example, the provider added vitamin D tests to the standard battery of tests ordered for patients, as a result of findings of an audit they had carried out. They also described regular case reviews carried out for challenging or unique cases to identify learning and improvement points.

The provider described the governance processes put in place following the inspection in May 2019. This ensured their policies were reviewed and/or updated in an organised, recorded way and at regular intervals.

Rose Valley Medical Centre is a private doctors consultation service for adults and children delivered by a sole practitioner on a private, fee paying basis only.

We interviewed the provider remotely but did not request feedback from patients as part of this desk-based follow up inspection.

Our key findings were:

  • The service had systems to assess, monitor and manage risks to patient safety.
  • The service had a governance framework in place which supported the delivery of quality care.

Dr Rosie Benneyworth BM BS BMedSci MRCGP


Chief Inspector of Primary Medical Services and Integrated Care

Inspection carried out on 8 May 2019

During a routine inspection

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Rose Valley Medical Centre on 8 May 2019 under Section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 as part of our regulatory functions.

Rose Valley Medical Centre is a private doctors consultation service for adults and children delivered by a sole practitioner. The service mainly provides pre-employment health checks commissioned by private companies. The provider sees between four and seven patients per week.

Rose Valley Medical Centre is registered with CQC under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 to provide the regulated activities: diagnostic and screening procedures and treatment of disease, disorder or injury.

The provider is the registered manager. A registered manager is a person who is registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We received five Care Quality Commission comment cards from patients who used the service; all were positive about the service experienced and reported that the service provided high-quality care.

Our key findings were:

  • There was a comprehensive set of policies and procedures governing activities. However, the provider did not have a system in place to ensure that children seen at the service were accompanied by an adult with parental responsibility.
  • There was limited quality improvement activity carried out at the service.
  • There was a complaints procedure in place and information on how to complain was readily available.
  • Systems and processes were in place to keep people safe. The provider had undertaken adult and child safeguarding in line with intercollegiate guidance.
  • The service had systems to manage risks, including a clear system to manage significant events and safety alerts.
  • The provider was aware of current evidence based guidance and they had the skills, knowledge and experience to carry out his role.
  • The service’s chaperones had received training and had a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check.
  • The service carried out appropriate referrals to patients’ GPs when additional treatment was required.
  • Comment cards indicated that patients were treated with compassion, kindness, dignity, and respect.

There areas where the provider must make improvements are:

  • Ensure care and treatment is provided in a safe way to patients

The areas where the provider should make improvements are:

  • Explore opportunities for quality improvement activity within the service.
  • Review policies and procedures within the service’s documented timeframe.

Dr Rosie Benneyworth BM BS BMedSci MRCGPChief Inspector of Primary Medical Services and Integrated Care