You are here

Reports


Inspection carried out on 15 June 2017

During a routine inspection

This was an announced inspection which took place on 15,16 and 19 June 2017. Two days before our inspection we contacted the service and told them of our plans to carry out a comprehensive inspection. This was because the location provides a domiciliary care service and we needed to be sure that the registered manager would be at the office.

True Homecare Limited is a domiciliary care service that provides personal care to people who live in their own homes. At the time of the inspection there were 93 people using the regulated services of personal care. The inspection was undertaken by one adult social care inspector.

The service was last inspected in June 2016. During that inspection we found breaches of one of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) regulations 2014. This resulted in us making two requirement actions. This was because medicines were not being managed safely and risks were not being assessed or mitigated properly. We also made three recommendations; that the service developed recording systems in relation to monitoring service quality and safety, that a structured approach to the provision of supervision and appraisal to staff be developed and that it improved its approach to care planning and assessment.

Following the inspection the provider wrote to us to tell us what action they intended to take to ensure they met all the relevant regulations. During this inspection we checked if the required improvements had been made. We found that improvements had been made, the requirement actions had been met and the service had acted on our recommendations.

The service has a registered manager who was present during our inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

All the people we spoke with were positive about the registered manager and the way they ran the service. Staff spoke very respectfully and fondly about the registered manager. We spent time with the registered manager throughout our inspection and found them to be committed to providing a good quality person centred service. Staff we spoke with shared this commitment.

There was a safe system in place for managing people’s medicines.

Individual and environmental risk assessments were person centred and gave staff guidance on how to minimise and manage identified risks. Care records, including initial assessments, were detailed and person centred. They contained information based on people’s needs and wishes and were sufficiently detailed to guide staff in how to provide the support people required. One staff member said, “The care plans tell us everything people want us to do and how they want things to be done.”

Care records, including care plans and risk assessments, had been reviewed regularly to ensure they reflected people’s changing needs and wishes. We saw that people who used the service had been involved in the reviews.

People who used the service told us they felt safe. Staff had received training in safeguarding adults. Staff were able to tell us how to identify and respond to allegations of abuse. They were also aware of the responsibility to ‘whistle blow’ on colleagues who they thought might be delivering poor care to people.

There was a safe system of recruitment in place which helped protect people who used the service from unsuitable staff. Staff received the induction, training, support and supervision they required to ensure they had the skills and knowledge needed to carry out their roles effectively. Staff told us they felt supported.

Visits were planned well. People told us the service was reliable and staff had enough time to provide them with the support they required. One person said, “They come a

Inspection carried out on 8 June 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 08 June 2016 and was announced.

True Homecare is a domiciliary care service that was launched in 2012. It is based in Cheadle, Stockport and provides personal care for people in their own homes. At the time of our inspection the service was providing support to approximately 80 people.

The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We last inspected True Homecare on 24 June 2013 when we found the service to be meeting all standards inspected. The inspection on 24 June 2013 was a follow-up inspection to check the service was meeting requirements in relation to breaches of the regulations identified during an inspection on 08 March 2013. These related to safeguarding, training and supervision and safe recruitment.

At this inspection we identified two breaches of one of the regulations in relation to the safe management of medicines, and in relation to assessing and mitigating risks. You can see what action we have told the provider to take at the back of this report. We have made three recommendations. We recommend that the service develops its' recording systems in relation to monitoring service quality and safety; that it develops a structured approach to the provision of supervision and appraisal to staff; and that it develops its' approach to care planning and assessment.

We found records relating to the support people required with their medicines were not always clear. It was not possible to tell with certainty which medicines staff had prompted people to take as it was unclear if the records of people’s medicines were up to date. There was also a lack of clarity or assessment in relation to the support people required with their medicines. This increased the risk people might not be receiving the correct support to manage their medicines safely.

We saw risk assessments were carried out to help identify risks. However, these assessments did not always identify risks that had been documented elsewhere, and they did not always clearly detail what steps should be taken to help reduce any potential risks. For example, we saw risks including self-neglect, falls and weight loss had been identified in local authority assessments. However, the service’s care plans and risk assessments did not set out how staff should manage these risks.

There was sufficient numbers of staff to enable all calls to be met. We received three reports of calls having been missed due to factors such as staff not turning up or administrative errors. People told us this was not a common occurrence however, and we saw instances where missed calls had been investigated and actions taken if required.

People told us they were supported by the same staff on a consistent basis. Staff were able to demonstrate that they knew people well, and people reported that they found staff to have a caring and considerate approach.

Staff were able to describe in detail how they had supported people in a sensitive manner and helped to maintain their privacy and dignity. All the people we spoke with told us staff respected their privacy, and relatives told us they did not find staff to be in anyway intrusive.

People told us they felt safe with the staff who provided support to them. Staff were aware of procedures for reporting any concerns they may have in relation to an individual’s health or wellbeing, and were able to provide examples of when they had reported such concerns.

Staff received training in a variety of areas including safeguarding, moving and handling, dementia care, first aid and communication. We saw staff had received supervision and their competency had also been assessed throu

Inspection carried out on 26 June 2013

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

We found during the inspection in March 2013 that that there were gaps in recruitment and in the staff training provided, including safeguarding vulnerable adults. This meant there was a potential risk that people would not always be cared for by staff that were supported to deliver care and treatment safely and to an appropriate standard. During the inspection in June 2013 we found that improvements had been made.

During the course of the inspection we spoke with five staff members, the newly appointed care coordinator and the registered manager.

We spoke with five people who used the service and two relatives. People who used the service all said they found the service to be either ‘excellent’ or 'very good,' and were very satisfied with the support they received from the carers and the manager. They told us they had no concerns and had no complaints about the service.

We spoke with two relatives of people who used the service. Both said they found the staff to be 'caring' and that they arrived on time and stayed for the allocated length of time.

Inspection carried out on 11 March 2013

During an inspection in response to concerns

We completed an unannounced inspection on 11 March 2013. We were in receipt of information from an anonymous source that the provider was not completing appropriate pre employment checks or training.

During the course of the inspection, we spoke with three people who used the service, two relatives and five staff members as well as the Registered Manager.

One person who used the service told us that staff were: "Excellent” and said: “They have never been late and they are always very polite and respectful." Another person said: “The manager is excellent she also provides care should the staff go off sick and she communicates with us regularly, I have no complaints.” Another person told us: “They are very good I would not wish to change.”

We found that care plans and risk assessments were sufficiently detailed for people receiving care and support and that staff completed daily communication records of the care provided.

During our inspection we saw evidence that the agency completed induction training with the staff, that this took place over a two day period but that there were gaps in the training and supervision provided.

We found that the agencies recruitment procedures were lacking in that references although requested, had not been returned prior to commencement of employment. We also found that staff had not received adequate supervision whilst awaiting the return of their Criminal Record Bureau checks.