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Victoria House Good Also known as Victoria House North East Limited

Reports


Inspection carried out on 23 August 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Victoria House is a residential care home converted from three terraced houses. Residential care is provided for people with a learning disability, physical disability or those with autism. The service provides personal care and support to up to nine people. At the time of the inspection there were nine people living at the service.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People received person-centred care which met their needs. A plan was in place for the ongoing review of care plans and risk assessments to ensure they reflected the support people received. People were encouraged to be independent and measures were identified to mitigate the risks they were exposed to.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People told us they felt safe. Systems were in place for reporting and responding to any allegations of abuse. Staff knew how to safeguard people and were confident to raise any concerns. The deputy manager was the identified safeguarding officer for the service.

There were enough staff deployed to meet the needs of people and staff worked flexibly to accommodate this. Staff were recruited safely and received training relevant to their job role to enable them to work effectively. Staff received supervision and appraisal in line with the provider’s policy and staff told us they felt supported by the management team.

Staff were polite and treated people with dignity and respect. The cultural needs of people were considered in the planning of care and individuals were involved and consulted in how they wanted support to be delivered. Systems were in place to communicate information to people in a way to maximise their understanding.

People were encouraged to be independent and links were established with the local community. Opportunities were available for people to engage in a range of activities and social events of their choice. Relevant referrals were made to health and social care professionals and staff followed their advice.

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection and update

The last rating for this service was requires improvement (published 23 August 2018) and there were breaches of good governance and safe care and treatment. The provider completed an action plan after the last inspection to show what they would do and by when to improve. At this inspection we found improvements had been made and the provider was no longer in breach of regulations.

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 10 July 2018

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 10, 16 and 23 July 2018 and was announced. The provider was given 24 hours’ notice because the location was a care home for people with a learning difficulty, who needed to be advised and prepared for the inspection.

Victoria House is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. The home is registered to provide support for up to nine people over two floors. It is a single home converted from three terraced houses. Residential care is provided for people with a learning disability, physical disability or those with an autistic type condition. Nursing care is not provided at the home. On all three days of the inspection there were nine people using the service.

The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen. Registering the Right Support CQC policy

The home had a registered manager who had been registered since May 2017. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Staff were aware of safeguarding issues and were confident about reporting any concerns around potential abuse. The home was working actively with services on issues external to the home. Monitoring was in place with regard to people’s financial affairs.

Checks were carried out on the equipment and safety of the home. The majority of checks carried out on systems and equipment were satisfactory. However, on the first day of the inspection we found upstairs rooms did not have window restrictors fitted. By the second day of the inspection this had been rectified. A risk assessment with regard to legionella was planned to be completed by the end of the month. Fire drills were undertaken at the home, although we noted none had taken place during the night shift. By the second day of the inspection the deputy manager had undertaken fire drills later in the evening and had also worked with the local Fire Service on a new fire plan for night staff. Personal emergency evacuation plans were not always detailed but contained information specific to the individual’s support needs.

People’s care plans contained risk assessments linked to their individual care plans. However, it was not clear how the levels of risk had been arrived at. We also found some areas of risk were not comprehensively covered or the level of risk did not reflect that detailed in local authority review documents. The home was maintained in a clean and tidy manner.

People and staff told us they felt there were enough staff on duty. Staff told us they were able to accompany people to access the community and support them with their personal care needs. Proper recruitment procedures and checks were in place to ensure staff employed by the service had the correct skills and experience.

Medicines at the home were managed appropriately. Medicines were safely stored and regular checks were made on stock levels and administration. Staff had received training with regard the safe handling of medicines.

Staff had an understanding of issues related to equality and diversity and what it meant for people using the service. They told us they had access to a range of training and updating and records confirmed this. They confirmed they had access to regular supervision and an annual appraisal and records supported this.

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