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Acacia Lodge Care Home Outstanding

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 10 July 2019

During a routine inspection

Acacia Lodge Care Home is a 60 bedded residential care home. The home is divided into three floors with one providing care for people who have dementia and two providing residential care. It is in New Moston, Manchester, and is close to the motorway network and local amenities. Acacia Lodge Care Home is owned by Avery Healthcare Group, a national provider of residential, respite and nursing home care. There were 56 people accommodated at the home when we inspected.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found.

The service was focused on providing exceptional person centred care and support for people who used the service.

The registered manager and provider ensured that there was a clear vision for the service to deliver individualised care and support. They were supported by a strong staff team who were appreciated by people who used the service, relatives and professionals.

The registered manager had undertaken training which they used to enhance the well-being of people who used the service, staff and relatives. This had a positive effect on the people we talked to and helped provide the calm and happy atmosphere we witnessed.

There was high-quality leadership in the service, and a very high level of caring for and supporting staff. Strong links had been developed with other health and social care professionals which enabled the provider to deliver consistently person-centred care.

Plans of care were extremely person centred and the details gave staff the information they needed to deliver individualised care. There was a failsafe system for staff and managers to review and update the plans. People could make comments via the electronic system to inform staff of their care needs and any other wishes such as activities.

The service empowered people who used the service to make decisions about how the home was run. This included activities, the food they ate and the recruitment of staff. Family members were encouraged to participate in social events which ensured they were involved in the home and supported their relatives.

There were robust means of raising concerns or complaints. Action was always taken, and the provider saw all feedback as a learning opportunity which may improve the service further.

The service provided many meaningful opportunities for people to mix socially with each other and their families. The service made excellent use of their tea room and cinema. We saw how people were engaged with each other, their families and staff in the tea room, which was a happy social event.

The registered manager and provider actively engaged in research, which then benefitted people who used the service. This included involvement with an orchestra, which is known to provide stimulation to people with a dementia. The service had used the service of a nutritionist to trial different menus and the chef gave demonstrations about food to teach about the importance of good nutrition and hydration.

Staff were encouraged to undertake further training to become more involved in the running of the home. The extra knowledge they gained was hugely beneficial to people who used the service. There had been a reduction in falls and behaviours that challenge.

The comprehensive audits ensured the service maintained and improved standards. We saw action was always taken when improvements could be made.

People were assessed prior to admission to the home to ensure they were suitably placed. Risk assessments ensured any specialised care, equipment and treatment was provided by the relevant professionals.

The principles of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) were followed to help protect people’s rights. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible.

People’s equality and diversity was respected. A history was taken of people’s past preferences and people were able to follow their religious or other needs to reflect their d

Inspection carried out on 28 September 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 28 September 2016 and 3 October 2016. The service had last been inspected in 2014 and was compliant in all areas at that time.

Acacia Lodge Care Home (Acacia Lodge) is a 60-bedded residential care home. The home provides care and support across three floors, with one floor supporting people living with dementia and the other two floors providing residential care. All rooms were single occupancy and contained en-suite bathroom facilities. The care home is located in New Moston, Manchester and is close to the motorway network and local amenities. Acacia Lodge is owned by Avery Healthcare Group, a national provider of residential, respite and nursing home care.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Everyone we spoke with told us they felt safe living at Acacia Lodge. All the relatives felt their loved ones were safe living there. Staff knew how to keep people safe and were aware of how and to whom they could report any safeguarding concerns. This meant that staff were aware of how to protect people from risk of harm.

Staff sought consent from people before providing care or support. The ability of people to make decisions was always assessed in line with legal requirements to ensure their liberty was not restricted unlawfully. Decisions were always taken in the best interests of people when necessary and applications were made for Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards appropriately.

Risk assessments were up to date. Care plans were written in consultation with the person or their families. People had been supported to be involved in identifying their support needs. Assessments included people’s likes and preferences and staff knew the people well.

People were well cared for and there were enough staff to support them effectively. The staff were knowledgeable about the needs of the people and had received appropriate training in order for them to meet people’s needs. The recruitment process was robust and all required checks were in place prior to staff commencing work. People living at Acacia Lodge were involved in the recruitment process which showed the service was taking their view into consideration.

People were well cared for and there were enough staff to support them effectively. The staff were knowledgeable about the needs of the people and had received appropriate training in order for them to meet people’s needs. The recruitment process was robust and all required checks were in place prior to staff commencing work. People living at Acacia Lodge were involved in the recruitment process which showed the service was taking their view into consideration.

Medicines were administered, stored and disposed of safely and in line with the required guidelines. There were appropriate guidance and protocols for staff when people needed ‘as required’ medicine.

Staff were observed as being kind and caring, and treated people with dignity and respect. There was an open, trusting relationship between the people and staff.

We saw people were fully supported to attend activities within the home. People had access to lots of different activities and were able to make choices about how they spent their time and where they went each day.

We saw people and their relatives had been asked for feedback about the service they received. There was a record of what actions had been taken to address any identified concerns. Staff worked well as a team; we saw them communicating with each other in a respectful and calm manner. There was an open and transparent culture which was promoted amongst the staff team.

Everyone knew who the registered manager was and felt the service was

Inspection carried out on 26 February 2014

During a routine inspection

People living in Acacia Lodge told us what it was like to live there and some of their comments included,, “I decide what time I get up, go to bed and how I spend my day. All the staff respect this and encourage me to make these choices.” Another person told us, “My health has greatly improved since I came to live here.”

We observed how people were cared for and saw that they were looked after in accordance with their care plans.

We found that people felt safe living in the home.

We found that enough skilled and experienced staff were being employed to meet the assessed needs of those people using the service.

Records, including care plans and risk assessments were found to be up to date and were being reviewed on a regular basis.

At the last inspection visit it was judged that the home was not meeting the requirements of the regulations in relation to consent arrangements and record keeping. At this visit to the service we found the home was meeting the regulations in relation to consent arrangements, care and welfare, safeguarding, supporting staff and record keeping.

Inspection carried out on 15, 16 August 2013

During an inspection in response to concerns

We completed this compliance review in response to concerns raised by our partner agencies including the local authority following safeguarding allegations concerning the home. The issues which arose from these allegations led us to look at specific outcomes and whether the home had made changes in light of the issues raised.

We spoke with several people who lived in the home and one relative of a person who lived at the home about the care provided. All the people we spoke with were very positive about the care they or their relatives received. One person who used the service told us: "We do different things every day". Another said:“They’d have a job to better it” and a third person said: “I don’t know anyone that comes here and doesn’t like it”. One relative stated: "We’ve been really pleased…They do quite pleasant things [referring to activities] …I’ve never had to complain". People confirmed that the home sought the views of people in the home and their relatives.

We found that the home was meeting the regulations in relation to care and welfare, nutrition, safeguarding, staffing and quality assurance. We judged that they were not meeting the requirements of the regulations in relation to consent arrangements and record keeping. We judged that this had (or may have had) a moderate impact on people using the service. Due to the action that the provider had already taken and previous evidence of action to make improvements, we have set compliance actions.

Inspection carried out on 6 December 2012

During a routine inspection

We used a number of different methods to help us understand the experiences of people using the service, including observing care and speaking to those people who could give their views on the home. We spoke with several people who lived in the home about their care and treatment. We also spoke with two sets of relatives of people who lived at the home. All the people we spoke with were very positive about the care they received. One person who used the service told us: This is the cleanest place you can find and I’ve never heard staff turn anybody down". Another said of staff that work in the home: "They’re there if I need help". A third person said: "I can’t fault it. We’re absolutely delighted with it... I didn’t think it would be like this. There is lots of things to do" .

We found that the home was meeting the essential standards and people were well cared for.