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Oakley Lodge Nursing Home Good

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 4 December 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service:

Oakley Lodge Nursing Home is a care home that provides support and nursing care for up to seven people with physical and learning disabilities. At the time of the inspection, seven people were living at the service.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found:

People and relatives told us people’s needs had been met by skilled and attentive staff. They said people lived in a caring and supportive environment. Staff were kind and caring, and motivated to provide care in a way that ensured people could live happy and fulfilled lives. One relative said, “On the whole, I’m very happy with the care. It’s a lovely service really.”

People were protected from harm by staff who were trained to identify and report concerns. People were safe because potential risks to their health and wellbeing had been managed well. There were enough staff to support people safely. People were supported to take their medicines. Lessons were learnt from incidents to prevent recurrence. Staff followed processes to prevent the spread of infections.

Detailed care plans ensured staff had information to help them to meet people’s assessed needs. People had been supported to have enough to eat and drink. People had access to healthcare services when required, and this helped them to maintain their health and well-being.

Staff were respectful in how they interacted with people and supported them. They understood people’s individual communication methods and they ensured they gave people information in ways they could understand. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. The policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

The provider had systems to assess and monitor the quality of the service. The registered manager and staff were motivated to provide the best service they could for people and their relatives. There had been good transition arrangements to the new provider to ensure continuity of care.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk.

Rating at last inspection:

The last rating for this service was good (published 9 June 2017).

Why we inspected:

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up:

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 11 May 2017

During a routine inspection

We carried out an unannounced inspection on 11 May 2017. The service provides care and support for up to seven people who have a learning disability and may also have physical disabilities or are living with dementia.

At the time of the inspection, there were seven people being supported by the service. There was a registered manager in post, who was also the provider of the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were safe and the provider had effective systems in place to safeguard them. There were risk assessments in place that gave guidance to the staff on how risks to people could be minimised. People’s medicines were managed safely and administered in a timely manner.

The provider had effective recruitment processes in place and there was sufficient staff to support people safely. Staff understood their roles and responsibilities in relation to the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). Staff had supervision, support and effective training that enabled them to support people well.

People were supported to have sufficient food and drinks and were supported in a caring and respectful manner. They were also supported to access other health and social care services when required.

People’s needs had been assessed, and care plans took account of people’s individual needs, preferences, and choices.

People were supported to pursue their hobbies and interests.

The provider had a formal process for handling complaints and concerns. They encouraged feedback from people or their representatives, and acted on the comments received to improve the quality of the service.

The registered manager provided stable leadership and managerial oversight to staff who felt supported in their roles.

The provider’s quality monitoring processes had been used effectively to drive improvements.

Inspection carried out on 16 April 2015

During a routine inspection

We carried out an unannounced inspection on 16 April 2015.

The service provides care and support for up to seven people who have a learning disability and may also have physical disabilities or are living with dementia. At the time of the inspection, there were seven people being supported by the service.

There was a registered manager in post, who was also the provider of the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were safe and the provider had effective systems in place to safeguard them.

There were risk assessments in place that gave guidance to the staff on how risks to people could be minimised.

People’s medicines were managed safely and administered in a timely manner.

The provider had effective recruitment processes in place and there was sufficient staff to support people safely. Staff understood their roles and responsibilities in relation to the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

Staff had supervision, support and effective training that enabled them to support people well.

People were supported to have sufficient food and drinks in a caring and respectful manner. They were also supported to access other health and social care services when required.

People’s needs had been assessed, and care plans took account of people’s individual needs, preferences, and choices.

People were supported to pursue their hobbies and interests.

The provider had a formal process for handling complaints and concerns. They encouraged feedback from people or their representatives, and acted on the comments received to improve the quality of the service.

The registered manager provided stable leadership and managerial oversight. They were a role model for the behaviours, values and standards of care they expected of others.

The provider’s quality monitoring processes had been used effectively to drive improvements.

Inspection carried out on 5 December 2013

During a routine inspection

When we inspected Oakley Lodge Nursing Home on 5 December 2013, we found a relaxed and caring environment, where people were supported by staff who were trained, knowledgeable and responsive to their needs. We used different methods, including observation to help us understand the experiences of people who used the service. This is because some of the people had complex needs which meant they were not able to communicate verbally.

We looked at the care records for four of the six people who used the service. We found people's needs had been assessed, and appropriate support plans and risk assessments were in place. Theywere reviewed regularly to reflect people's changing needs. Although most people were unable to give informed consent, we found they were supported in a way that promoted their rights.

People's nutritional needs were met and their food preferences respected. Appropriate systems were in place to support a person who required percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) feeding.

Inspection carried out on 13 December 2012

During a routine inspection

When we visited Oakley Lodge Care Home on 13 December 2012, we used different methods including observation to help us understand the experiences of people using the service, because some of the people using the service had complex needs which meant they were not able to communicate verbally. We also reviewed the care records of five of the six people living at the home.

We saw that people were offered support at a level which encouraged their independence and ensured that individual needs were met. The atmosphere within the home was relaxed which meant that people were at ease in the presence of the staff supporting them. We observed that staff were polite and respectful in their approach to people and observant to the needs of the people they were supporting. There was evidence of people working together with staff in decorating the home for the Christmas period.

During our visit, we noted that people were involved in planning their care and made decisions about how they spent their free time. People were supported to leave the home to go shopping and were encouraged to participate in other activities within the home. One person said, "I'm happy here, I like my room and I like the staff." A relative told us, "I'm really pleased that she (speaking about the person using the service) came here, I have no complaints at all."