You are here

Daneside Court Nursing Home Good

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

Reports


Review carried out on 9 September 2021

During a monthly review of our data

We carried out a review of the data available to us about Daneside Court Nursing Home on 9 September 2021. We have not found evidence that we need to carry out an inspection or reassess our rating at this stage.

This could change at any time if we receive new information. We will continue to monitor data about this service.

If you have concerns about Daneside Court Nursing Home, you can give feedback on this service.

Inspection carried out on 25 May 2021

During an inspection looking at part of the service

About the service

Daneside Court is a residential care home providing personal and nursing care to 47 people aged 65 and over at the time of the inspection. The service can support up to 64 people. The care home accommodates people in purpose-built premises over two floors.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

The nutritional needs of people were now better recorded and dining experiences for people had improved through regular checks by the registered manager. People were satisfied with the food provided but when issues were raised; these were dealt with promptly.

Systems used to monitor the quality of care provided were more effective with actions being identified and addressed in a timely manner. Staff considered that the registered manager was supportive and approachable. People told us that they knew who the registered manager was and they had regular contact with them. Relatives told us that the service was well-run and transparent.

People told us they felt safe living at Daneside Court. For those who could not express a view, observations found people were relaxed and comfortable with the staff team at all times. The recruitment of permanent registered nurses had been achieved and there were sufficient suitably recruited and trained staff available to respond to people’s needs. Robust measured were in place to mitigate the risk of people being infected by COVID-19 and relatives commented that despite their concerns about the health of their relations during the pandemic; the service had kept them safe.

People and relatives told us that the staff team were knowledgeable about their needs and sought to prevent adverse health conditions developing further through prompt contact with other medical professionals. The design of the building assisted people to mobilise independently and signage assisted with their orientation.

Care plans were person-centred and included the health and social needs of each person. People and relatives told us that they knew how to make a complaint and any received were responded to promptly. The wishes of people reaching the end of their lives and relatives were recorded and respected.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection (and update)

The last rating for this service was requires improvement (published 14 January 2020) and there was a breach of a regulation relating to good governance and nutrition. The provider completed an action plan after the last inspection to show what they would do and by when to improve. At this inspection we found improvements had been made and the provider was no longer in breach of this regulation.

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

We looked at infection prevention and control measures under the Safe key question. We look at this in all care home inspections even if no concerns or risks have been identified. This is to provide assurance that the service can respond to COVID-19 and other infection outbreaks effectively.

We reviewed the information we held about the service. No areas of concern were identified in the other key questions. We therefore did not inspect them. Ratings from previous comprehensive inspections for those key questions were used in calculating the overall rating at this inspection.

The overall rating for the service has changed from Require Improvement to Good. This is based on the findings at this inspection.

You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection, by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for Daneside Court on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as

Inspection carried out on 11 December 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Daneside Court Nursing Home is a care home providing personal and nursing care to adults aged 18 and over at the time of the inspection. The service can support up to people.

The care home accommodates people over two floors of a purpose built adapted building. People on the upper floor are supported by a Nurse.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

There were governance systems in place to monitor the quality and effectiveness of the service. However, this did not highlight or address some of the concerns identified at this inspection.

People's hydration and nutritional needs were not always monitored or managed well. The dining experience for some people required improving.

Records used to demonstrate what care had been delivered throughout the course of the day and night were not always completed. Therefore, we could not be assured that people received the right care and the right time.

People said, and we observed, that there could be a delay in staff responding. We were also told there was sometimes lack of continuity in nursing care due to agency staffing being used the majority of the time. The provider told us they were trying to recruiting into these posts, but it was continuing to be problematic. We made a recommendation that the provider further review the number and deployment of staff throughout the home.

People's dignity was not always fully maintained. We observed people's bedroom doors were not always closed when staff were supporting people and the way in which some staff communicated with each other did not always afford the confidentiality or respect of people at the service.

Processes were in place to ensure the safe management of medicines. We spoke with the provider about ensuring the use of prescribed thickeners were appropriately recorded.

People's care plans were complete although not all were personalised or contained information on a person’s background. Staff, however, knew people and how they wished to be supported.

Risks to people had been identified and steps taken to mitigate any further occurrence. Lessons had been learnt from adverse incidents and reflective reviews undertaken with staff.

People and relatives told us that staff were kind and caring. They told us that they had not had to raise any concerns about their care but that there was a complaints system in place should they need to do so.

Staff knew how to safeguard people from abuse. They were recruited using systems which reduced the risk of unsuitable candidates being employed. Staff were supported through induction, training and supervision to ensure they had the skills and knowledge required.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. Staff sought consent from people when assisting them and had an understanding of the Mental Capacity Act.

A staff member was appointed to look at the physical and emotional wellbeing of people at the service A range of activities had been made available to people which were appreciated and enjoyed The service worked with other professionals to meet people's needs in a holistic way.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was good (published ).

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Enforcement

We have identified breaches in relation to maintaining adequate nutrition, record keeping and good governance at this inspection.

Follow up

We will request an action plan for the provider to understand what they will do to improve the standards of quality and safety. We will work alongside the provider and local authority to monitor progress. We will return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concern

Inspection carried out on 15 May 2017

During a routine inspection

Daneside Court is a nursing home which can accommodate up to 64 older adults who need residential or nursing care. The home is owned by HC-One Limited. The service is a two storey purpose built home with a range of lounges and communal space for people to use. They have single room en-suite accommodation on both floors. The garden has seating areas, is accessible to people and is secure.

On the day of this inspection there were 55 people living at Daneside Court.

At the last inspection on 5 January 2015 the service was rated Good. At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

People and family members told us the staff were kind, caring and very helpful. They said the service and care was excellent. Comments included “I am very happy here”, “The staff are very good” and “The staff are very nice.” People told us that the food was very good. Relatives confirmed that people were safe with the staff and within Daneside Court .

People and family members told us that they had no concerns or complaints about the service. They were aware of and had access to the registered provider’s complaints policy and they said they would speak to staff if they had any concerns.

Care plans were well documented and held good information about the individual person. Risk assessments were in place as needed and were individually tailored to each person’s needs. All documentation was up to date. Medication was administered safely.

People were supported by staff who were knowledgeable about them and who had undertaken sufficient training to meet people’s needs. Staff recruitment was robust and prospective staff undertook appropriate checks prior to starting work at the service. Staff had good supervision and were encouraged to attend meetings.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. Staff were aware of the safeguarding policies and procedures and had received training in safeguarding adults.

The environment was clean and well maintained and the décor was of a good standard.

The registered manager used a range of methods to assess, monitor and improve the quality and safety of the service. These included regular audits across the service and meetings with people, family members and staff to seek their views about the quality of care being provided. A wide range of compliments had been received regarding the service.

Inspection carried out on 5 January 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 5 January 2015 and was unannounced. We arrived at the home at 9.30am and left at 4.30pm. The service met all of the regulations we inspected against at our last inspection on 2 May 2013.

Daneside Court Nursing Home is registered to provide personal and nursing care for up to 64 older people. On the day of the inspection 56 people were living in the home.

The home has single room en-suite accommodation over two floors. Each floor has lounges, dining areas and bathing and toilet facilities. There is also a garden, which has seating and tables.

The home has a registered manager who has been in post since 2012. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The experiences of people who lived at the home were positive. People told us they felt safe living at the home, staff were kind and compassionate and the care they received was good. Relatives told us they had no concerns about the way their family members were treated. Some of the comments from relatives included, “A big weight was lifted when dad came here” and “I`ve never had a problem here – if there was anything wrong they are straight on the phone to let you know”.

People’s needs were assessed and care plans were developed to identify what care and support people required.

People spoke positively about the care and support they received. Comments included: “Staff are nice, they’re very caring”; “I’ve not been here long but staff are spending time getting to know me”; “The staff couldn’t be better”; “Care is good, no complaints at all”.

There were regular reviews of people’s health were referred to appropriate health and social care professionals to ensure they received treatment and support for their specific needs.

People received visitors throughout the day and we saw they were welcomed and included. People told us they could visit at any time and were always made to feel welcome. A relative told us “The home has a lovely atmosphere – I come in a lot and the staff always discuss things with you – the manager is so approachable”.

The staff ensured people’s privacy and dignity were respected. We saw that bedroom doors were always kept closed when people were being supported with personal care.

People remarked that the food was good. One person said, “I eat more now than I’ve ever eaten”.

People could choose how to spend their day and they took part in activities in the home and the community. The home employed activity organisers and volunteers who engaged people in activities in small groups during the day.

Staff received specific training to meet the needs of people using the service and received support from the management team to develop their skills. Staff had also received training in how to recognise and report abuse. All were clear about how to report any concerns. Staff spoken with were confident that any allegations made would be fully investigated to ensure people were protected.

People knew who to speak to if they wanted to raise a concern and there were processes in place for responding to complaints.

Some people who used the service did not have the ability to make decisions about some parts of their care and support. Staff had an understanding of the systems in place to protect people who could not make decisions and followed the legal requirements outlined in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

There were processes to monitor the quality of the service and we saw from recent audits that the service was meeting their internal quality standards.

Inspection carried out on 2 May 2013

During a routine inspection

At our previous visit in February 2013 we found that people were not protected against the risks associated with medicines. At this visit there had been an improvement to the management of medication which meant medicines were handled safely and appropriately.

We spoke to thirteen people who used the service. They said they were getting the care and support they needed. Some comments made were: - �The staff are fantastic. They will do anything for you.� �The staff are great, they look after you very well.� �I�m very happy here.�

We spoke to seven relatives who were happy with the care and support provided. They described the staff as supportive and caring. Some comments made were: - �It�s a smashing place.� �The staff look after my relative very well.�

During our visit we observed that staff were respectful, attentive and had a caring attitude towards the people who used the service. When people asked for support they received a good response.

We found that people had been assessed before they began to use the service and they had care plans that identified their needs. People's nutritional needs were well met.

There were good systems in place to promote infection control.

The staff were provided with the support they needed to enable them to meet the needs of the people who used the service.

There were good systems in place to monitor the quality of the service which meant that any shortfalls could be identified and improvements made when necessary.

Inspection carried out on 28 February 2013

During an inspection looking at part of the service

We spoke with three service users and one relative about medicines handling at the home. No-one we spoke with expressed any concerns. One person we spoke with told us that care workers �always ask you about your painkillers and they make sure they are well spaced (through the day)�. A second person confirmed that they had everything they needed to manage some of their own medicines.

However, we found that some of the concerns identified at out previous visit remained to be addressed

Inspection carried out on 10 September 2012

During an inspection looking at part of the service

Our inspection on 30th May 2012 found improvements were needed to care planning records, the arrangements in place for obtaining the consent of the people who used the service, management of medication and staffing levels.

At this visit we identified that there had been improvements to staffing levels, practices around obtaining consent and care planning records. However, some further improvements were needed to the management of medication.

We spoke to five people who used the service. They said they were happy with the care and support they received from staff. They said that staff were attentive and provided support when it was needed. One person said they would like a change to be made to their bedtime routines which was brought to the attention of the temporary manager. Some comments made were:-

�We are well looked after. The staff are attentive and they come when they are needed.�

�I am happy enough. The staff are very good.�

We spoke to seven visitors who were relatives or friends. All described the care and support provided by staff positively. They said that staff were helpful, caring and respectful.

Inspection carried out on 24 May 2012

During a routine inspection

We spoke to six people who used the service. All were generally positive about the standard of care and support they received. They said the staff were respectful, promoted their dignity and were kind and caring. They said they had their health needs met and the staff ensured that health professionals assessed their well-being when this was needed. The people spoken with said they decided on their own daily routine and got up and retired to bed as they wanted. Some comments made were:-

�I�m happy, it�s a fairly nice service.�

�It�s good here. The staff are good with me.�

�The service is alright, I like the staff, I had a lovely celebration here. I see the doctor when I need to.�

�The staff are very kind and caring. They have been very good to me.�

�The home is clean and safe and I have a nice bedroom. The food is good.�

All the people we spoke to said they felt safe at the home. They said that if they had any concerns about how they were being cared for or treated they would make their views known to senior staff or to a relative.

The people we spoke with had mixed views about the food provided. Two people said the food was good. The remaining four people said that the quality varied from day to day.

Four out to the six people spoken with said they either had not seen or did not recall seeing their care plan. Some people said they had the opportunity to give their views about the service through surveys, residents meetings and reviews of care needs and some people did not think that they were given the opportunity to give their views.

We spoke with four people in the nursing unit and two in the residential unit. The people in the residential unit considered that staffing levels were sufficient. Two of the people in the nursing unit did not think that there were enough staff all of the time. They said that on some days the staff were very rushed and people had to wait to have their needs met.

We spoke to a relative who informed us that the staff promoted the privacy and dignity of the people who used the service. However they were concerned that sometimes there were not enough staff available and about the frequent changes of staff and management.

We asked the commissioners of the service and social workers for their views. Two issues of concern were raised by Cheshire West and Chester Social Services. These were about the frequency that a person was having their personal care needs met and about unclear risk assessment record keeping following an accident at the home. These issues were being followed up by Cheshire West and Chester Social Services.

Inspection carried out on 14 November 2011

During an inspection looking at part of the service

During our visit in November 2011 we spoke with two people who live on the nursing unit at the home. They told us that care staff and nurses work hard, look after them well and are kind and caring. Neither had any complaints or concerns about their care.

We also spoke with three relatives of people who live on the nursing unit at the home. They told us their relatives are looked after well by staff who are kind and caring and their care and welfare needs are met. However, one relative said there is a lack of activities and stimulation for people living at the home.

All the people we spoke to said generally there is enough care staff and nurses to meet people�s needs. Two said they felt staffing levels are often lower during the day at weekends which meant those staff on duty were very busy at these times. One relative said they had seen many changes to nursing staff during the last year which had disrupted continuity of care. Another person living on the nursing unit said they felt the nursing unit and staff was much better organised since the new clinical supervisor had started working there in August.