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Royal Mencap Society - Churchfields Good

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 2 August 2017

During a routine inspection

Royal Mencap Society, Churchfields provides accommodation with care for up to 13 people. Royal Mencap Society, Churchfields also provides a personal care service within the community at the time of the inspection 19 people were receiving personal care.

At our last inspection this service was rated ‘Good’ and at this inspection we found that the service remained ‘Good’.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The registered manager monitored the quality of service people received and looked at ways the service could be continuously improved. We have made a recommendation about improving consistency across the service.

People received a safe service and were protected from the risk of harm. There were enough staff that had been safely recruited to help keep people safe and meet their needs. Medication management was good and people received their medication as prescribed.

People were cared for by experienced, supported and well trained staff. The service supported people to have as much choice and control over their lives in the least restrictive way possible. People received sufficient food and drink to meet their needs and preferences and their healthcare needs were met.

Staff knew the people they cared for well and were kind, caring and compassionate in their approach. People were encouraged and supported to remain as independent as possible. Staff ensured that people were treated with dignity and respect and their privacy was maintained at all times.

People were fully involved in the assessment and care planning process. Their care plans had been regularly reviewed to reflect their changing needs. People were encouraged and supported to participate in a range of activities to suit their individual interests. Complaints were dealt with appropriately in a timely way.

Inspection carried out on 11 November 2015

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced inspection carried out on 11 November 2015.

We last inspected Churchfields in November 2013. At that inspection we found the service was meeting the legal requirements in force at the time. The service is registered to accommodate up to 34 people with a learning disability. At this inspection 28 people were resident. Accommodation is in small scale bungalows and flats with a central office and small day centre.

A registered manager is in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Staff had received training about safeguarding and knew how to respond to any allegation of abuse to assist them to protect people from harm. Staff were aware of the whistle blowing procedure which was in place to report concerns and poor practice.

Staff had received training and had a good understanding of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Best Interest Decision Making, where decisions were made on behalf of people who were unable to make decisions themselves. Other appropriate training was provided and staff were supervised and supported.

People received their medicines in a safe and timely way. People had access to health care professionals to make sure they received appropriate care and treatment. Staff followed advice given by professionals to make sure people received the care they needed.

Menus were individual and staff were aware of people’s likes and dislikes and special diets that were required. Activities and outings were provided according to people’s preferences.

Staff knew the people they were supporting well. Care was provided by the staff with patience and kindness and people’s privacy and dignity were respected. Care plans were in place detailing how people wished to be supported and people were involved in making decisions about their care.

People we spoke with said they knew the staff well that supported them and felt able to bring up any concerns. There was an effective complaints system in place to respond to concerns raised. The provider undertook a range of audits to check on the quality of care provided. There was regular consultation with people and/ or family members and their views were used to improve the service.

Staff and relatives said the management team were approachable. Communication was effective ensuring people and their relatives were kept up to date about any changes in people’s care and support needs and the running of the service.

Inspection carried out on 4 November 2013

During a routine inspection

We found the service was well led by a person who was knowledgeable and well-liked by people at the service, relatives and staff. We found the service was responsive to people�s needs. One relative told us that the service worked hard to meet the changing health needs of their relative. We found that the service was responsive to matters raised during our inspection and put matters right immediately.

There had been a restructure within the service with a cultural change driven by the organisation. This had led to several staff vacancies. These have been covered with high agency usage of late. However, this is set to improve by Christmas 2013 as a program of recruitment comes to an end. We found that medication was safely managed and that staff were trained appropriately in techniques needed to administer complex medication. We found that the service was able to listen to people if they wanted to raise concerns.

Inspection carried out on 8 August 2012

During a routine inspection

We spoke with five people who used the service and observed four people who were not able to verbalise. People told us what they had been doing and what staff supported them with. For example staff supported people with personal care, attending leisure activities and work placements. Some people went home to their families on a regular basis and staff used the homes transport to facilitate this. Two people told us that there was a pamper evening taking place that day and they were getting their nails done. One person said staff regularly took them to the hairdressers. People said they had holidays planned.