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Reports


Inspection carried out on 24 April 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service: Riverside Care Home provides accommodation, nursing and residential care for up to 87 people who may be living with dementia, physical disability or require nursing care. The home is located in a residential area of Manchester and caters for young people over the age of 18 as well as older adults. There were 78 people using the service at the time of the inspection.

People’s experience of using this service:

Improvements to medicines management and quality audits have been made since our last inspection in March 2018. The service is now rated as good in all areas.

Staff were kind and caring and there were sufficient numbers to keep people safe and to meet their care needs.

People were supported by staff who were motivated, enjoyed their job and felt well supported through supervision and training.

Care plans were up to date and detailed exactly what care and support people wanted and needed.

Risk assessments were in place and showed what action had been taken to mitigate any risks which had been identified.

People felt safe at the home and appropriate referrals were being made to the safeguarding team when necessary.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

Medicines were being administered safely and people’s health and dietary needs were met.

Activities and outings were arranged to keep people occupied.

The home was clean and tidy.

There was a complaints procedure available which enabled people to raise any concerns or complaints about the care or support they received.

The registered manager provided staff with leadership and was approachable. Audits and checks were used to drive improvements to the service people received.

People’s feedback was used to make changes to the service, for example, the development of a private family room.

Rating at last inspection: Requires improvement (report published 7 June 2018). The overall rating has improved to good following this inspection

Why we inspected: This was a planned inspection based on the rating at the last inspection.

Follow up: We will continue to monitor intelligence we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If any concerning information is received we may inspect sooner.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Inspection carried out on 19 March 2018

During a routine inspection

This inspection was carried out over three days between 19 and 21 March 2018. Our visit on 19 March was unannounced.

We last inspected Riverside in January 2017. At that inspection we rated the service as ‘Good’ in caring and responsive domains and ‘Requires Improvement’ in the safe, effective and well-led domains. At that inspection we found four regulatory breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 and one breach of the Care Quality Commission (Registration) Regulations 2009. These previous breaches were around a failure to notify CQC of all incidents that affect the health, safety and welfare of people who use the service, the registered provider had not protected people against the risks associated with the safe administration and management of medicines and appropriate risk assessments were not in place for oral hygiene. The registered provider had failed to ensure people were not deprived of their liberty without the legal safeguards in place and systems to monitor the safety and quality of the service required improvements to ensure compliance with the regulations were not robust and had not identified the breaches found at that inspection. As a result of these breaches we issued requirement notices to the registered provider and they supplied us with action plans on how they were now compliant with the regulations. At this inspection we reviewed the information in the action plans that had been sent to us.

Riverside is a care home that provides accommodation, nursing and residential care. The home is registered to provide care for up to 90 people, who may be living with dementia, physical disability or require nursing care. Riverside is owned by Care UK.

The home is located in a residential area of Tameside and caters for young people over the age of 18 as well as older adults.

The home is split into four units over two floors and there is a passenger lift serving both floors. On the ground floor there is the Shelley unit which is a 20 bedded unit providing care to younger adults and Bronte unit which is an 18 bedded unit providing residential dementia care. On the first floor there is the Nightingale unit, which is a 22 bedded nursing care unit and the Lowry unit which is a 27 bedded unit providing dementia nursing care. All rooms are single.

At the time of our inspection 73 people were living at Riverside. At this inspection we were unable to visit the Nightingale unit due to a suspected outbreak of illness.

The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

This was a scheduled comprehensive inspection; however, this had been prioritised as we had received information of concern around safeguarding people from the risk of harm. These concerns were regarding the provider ensuring people were protected from potential abuse. We found the registered manager was managing these allegations and taking appropriate action.

We identified continued breaches of two regulations of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. These breaches were around medication errors and management oversight. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.

We looked at the safe management and administration of medicines and found medication was not always managed safely. We found regular checks and balances were carried out by senior staff; however, we found medication errors during our audit of safe medication management. We were unable to ascertain if people had received the right medicines in the right amounts at the right time. As a result, we sent an alert to the l

Inspection carried out on 31 October 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection was carried out over three days on the 31 October, 1 and 2 November 2016. Our visit on 31 October 2016 was unannounced.

We last inspected Riverside on 22 September 2014. At that inspection we found the service was meeting the regulation we assessed.

Riverside is a care home that provides accommodation, nursing and residential care. The home is registered to provide care for up to 90 people, but provides care for up to 87 people, who may be living with dementia, physical disability or require nursing care.

The home is located in a residential area of Manchester and caters for young people over the age of 18 as well as older adults.

The home is split into four units over two floors and there is a passenger lift serving both floors. On the ground floor there is the Shelley unit which is a 20 bedded unit providing care to younger adults and Bronte unit which is a 18 bedded unit providing residential dementia care. On the first floor there is the Nightingale unit which is a 22 bedded nursing care unit and the Lowry unit which is a 27 bedded unit providing dementia, nursing care. All rooms are single.

At the time of our inspection 79 people were living at Riverside.

The service did not have a registered manager in place. The manager took up post in December 2015 and was in the process of applying to the Care Quality Commission (CQC) for registration and had received a date for interview. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.’

During this inspection we identified four breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 and one breach of Care Quality Commission (Registration) Regulations 2009.

Some medicines were not managed safely for example we found instructions for care staff to administer topical creams did not accurately reflect the directions of the GP. This meant there was a risk that prescribed creams may not have been applied when required, which could have resulted in unnecessary discomfort for the person.

In addition we saw that the covert medication policy was not being appropriately adhered to for five people receiving their medication covertly. Covert medication is the administration of any medical treatment in a disguised form. This usually involves disguising medication for example by administering it in food and drink; as a result, the person is unknowingly taking medication.

We saw that risk assessments were not being undertaken for oral hygiene and people did not have a plan of care to direct staff how to meet this this care need.

People can only be deprived of their liberty to receive care and treatment when this is in their best interests and legally authorised under the Mental Capacity Act. The application procedure for this in care homes is called the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). During this inspection it was identified that the provider had not complied with their duty to notify us of all authorised DoLS. We saw evidence that during 2016 there were 11 authorised DoLs but the service had only notified us of four. This is a failure to notify the Commission of required events. In addition we saw that two of the DoLS authorisations had expired and had not been reapplied for. This meant two people were deprived of their liberty for the purpose of receiving care and treatment without lawful authority. The applications were made during the course of the inspection.

There were systems in place to monitor the quality of the service to ensure people received safe and effective care. However these audits had failed to identify the issues and concerns we found during our inspection and therefore required improvements.

Although the service employed a num

Inspection carried out on 22 September 2014

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

During our inspection we spoke with the two deputy managers, two care staff, two people living in the home and four relatives who were visiting. We looked at a selection of the provider’s records, including the audits carried out by the service and three care plan records.

We considered the evidence collected under the outcomes which were reviewed and addressed the following questions: is the service safe; is the service effective; is the service well led; is the service caring?

Is the service safe?

Improvements had been made to the management processes by the introduction of robust auditing systems. We looked at these audits and saw that they were carried out on each unit on a regular basis. The staff we spoke with told us that they found these helpful as it enabled any shortfalls to be identified quickly and addressed in a timely manner.

We found that care plans were in place and included the relevant information to help staff to provide care and support to people in a safe and appropriate way.

People we spoke with and their relatives spoke highly of the staff team and all the relatives we spoke with told us they felt confident in the staff and the way they provided care. They told us that they were confident that their relative was safe.

Is the service effective?

Care plans and risk assessments were up to date and regularly reviewed. This meant staff had information on the current health care needs of people living in the home. Each person had a support plan in place to monitor all aspects of their health and well-being.

Is the service responsive?

We saw that people’s care plans were reviewed regularly and when any concerns were identified the relevant healthcare professional was involved. When we spoke with families they told us that the service always ensured that people saw a general practitioner or other health care professional if it was necessary.

Is the service caring?

During our visit people spoke highly of the care that was provided to people living in the home. We spent time observing the interactions between staff and people living in the home. We saw that there was good communication used by staff and we saw that people were cared for in a way that promoted their privacy and dignity. One relative told us, “I haven’t got any complaints at all. I feel I can talk to the manager or staff about any problem. My relative had a few medical problems but the staff got in contact with the relevant people and the problems were solved. The staff are really good and they listen to me. I can talk with them and they answer all my questions. If they don’t know the answer, they always find out for me. I know my relative is well looked after and if there is ever an incident they always let me know.”

Is the service well led?

When we spoke with the staff team they told us that the manager was very supportive and had introduced a series of auditing tools to help ensure the provision of a safe service. The systems we looked at demonstrated that key aspects of care practice were being monitored on a regular basis.

We spoke with the manager via the telephone following our inspection visit and she confirmed that she had submitted an application form to the Care Quality Commission to become the registered manager for the service.

Inspection carried out on 8 July 2014

During a routine inspection

Riverside is a care home that provides accommodation, nursing and residential care for up to 90 people. At the time of our visit there were 62 people living in the home.

It is a legal requirement that a manager is registered with the Care Quality Commission for this service. Registration ensures a manager shares legal accountability for the service with the service provider. At the time of our visit to Riverside the manager was not registered with us. However, we were told that their application was due to be submitted following receipt of all their Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks.

The inspection was undertaken by two inspectors. This summary addresses five key questions; is the service safe; is the service effective; is the service caring; if the service responsive and is the service well led?

This is a summary based on a visit to the home where we spoke with the manager, the regional director, and a number of staff on duty at the time of the visit. We looked at records and talked in private with some people using the service and some of their families.

The full report contains evidence to support this summary.

Is the service safe?

People who used the service and the staff we spoke with told us they believed people living in the home were safe. Staff training included safeguarding. When we spoke with staff they had a good knowledge and understanding of safeguarding procedures and what to do in the event of any allegations of abuse. One member of staff told us that they would not hesitate to report any concern where it had an impact on a person health and well being.

Quality audits were in place and the manager was further developing these systems with the regional manager so that there was a system in place to promote the health and well being of people living in the home.

Is the service effective?

People who used the service had their needs assessed. The assessment included assessments of potential risks posed by the behaviours or abilities of the individual. The care plan was developed from these assessments. People using the service were encouraged to be involved in their care planning and influence the way in which care and support was provided to them.

Is the service caring?

During our visit we saw staff working well with people living in the home. We saw several examples of good practice and good communication between people. People living in the home told us they were happy with the way they received care and support from staff and that they felt safe. They told us they could express their views and that they felt listened to. Family members we spoke with gave mixed views about the quality of the care and support delivered by staff. Some people thought that the staff were slow to respond to concerns and that on occasions any investigations into concerns were slow.

All people we spoke with spoke highly of the kind nature of staff and that they felt staff were well trained and qualified to do their job.

Is the service responsive?

During our visit we saw staff respond to the needs of people living in the home in a timely manner. We saw staff engaging in meaningful conversations with people.

Care plan records showed that when a new care need was identified the staff reported this appropriately and that the relevant health care professional was contacted. This meant that people were supported to access the relevant healthcare service to meet their specific health care needs.

We saw that meetings were arranged to listen to the views of the people using the service and we saw that the service had systems in place to seek the views of the people. The manager told us that service user feedback forms were sent from head office and that she intended to use any finding to look at issues of concern and look at ways in which to improve the service.

Is the service well led?

The new manager had been in post since April 2014. When we visited the home she told us about the auditing systems she had implemented. There was an understanding from the manager that these required further development so that a detailed and comprehensive audit trail was in place to check that all aspect of the running of the home were monitored in an effective and meaningful way. We spoke with the regional manager who told us that there would be support for the manager to support her in establishing strong infrastructures of quality monitoring systems.

We saw evidence of quality monitoring systems which covered all aspects of the service delivery, and we saw that where appropriate the manager had sought help or listened to advice from other professionals. We also saw examples where communication between the manager and senior clinical lead staff required attention so that people using the service received the right care at the right time.

During discussions with the manager and regional director we were told that the service would benefit from a structured support plan and that an action plan would be put into place internally to address the shortfalls.

Inspection carried out on 16 September 2013

During a routine inspection

We observed care on all of the four units at Riverside.

We spoke with two people who used the service their comments included: “I feel staff treat me like an individual”. And: “They know that talking makes me tired. The staff are very good”.

We spoke with five relatives of people who used the service and their comments included: “I’ve been very unhappy with the care he got but now things have improved a lot”. “We’re both treated with respect”.

We found that relatives we spoke with did not feel involved with care planning and some legal requirements in respect of people’s human rights were not being followed.

We found care plans were person centred and contained daily recordings. However we found some people left unattended for periods of time whilst some had not had their weight checked for over three weeks.

We found people who used the service received their medication in a safe manner.

We found that overall the home was clean but did find areas which would benefit from refurbishment.

We had received concerning information about staffing levels at Riverside prior to our inspection. We found that there were sufficient numbers of staff on duty at the time of our visit.

We found information during our visit which showed that not all care records had been updated.

The home had systems in place to monitor the quality of their service provision.

Inspection carried out on 2 January 2013

During a routine inspection

This was our first inspection of Riverside since their registration with CQC. We asked people about their care, the care they had received and if they had been involved in making decisions about their care.

People told us they had been happy with the care and support they had received. We were told ''They couldn't do anything better" and "The best bit is the carers".

We spoke with relatives of people who use services. Comments included "People are looked after well", "They’re smashing, he gets looked after and they love him to bits”

We spoke with a member of staff from each unit and the manager. Staff told us that were well supported by the new manager and thought that the home provided a good service. The records we saw confirmed when people's care had been explained or when people's care had been reviewed.

We found that the home was compliant against the six outcomes we inspected. Although we have asked the provider to take note of some findings. The interior lacked natural light and appeared dark. On one unit we found a slight smell. We saw evidence that the carpet was being cleaned and people told us that this was unusual. The manager told us that there are plans for Riverside to undergo major refurbishment in 2013. The issue of light will be addressed.