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Westbridge House Rehabilitation Unit Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 2 September 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Westbridge House Rehabilitation Unit is registered to provide care and accommodation for up to 25 people. The home provides care for those with needs relating to their mental health and misuse of drugs and alcohol. At the time of inspection there were 22 people living at the service.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People living at Westbridge rehabilitation unit were happy and well supported. The home provided a safe place for people to live and enjoy their lives. Risks to people were assessed and managed appropriately to promote independence. There were suitable numbers of appropriately recruited staff. People were supported to self-medicate when possible and appropriate systems were in place to manage medicines safely.

Staff were well trained and received suitable support. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. People’s diverse needs were assessed and respected.

Staff were kind and caring and promoted positive relationships with people within the environment. Staff understood their roles clearly and knew what was expected of them. The service had a warm, friendly and welcoming atmosphere with people enjoying the way staff provided them with care and support. Relatives spoke positively about the service.

People and their relatives told us they were able to spend time in a way they chose to. Staff understood the importance of supporting people to be socially included and prevented them from social isolation. Complaints were responded to in line with company policy. People were encouraged to express their feelings and were supported with bereavement.

The service was focused on people’s wellbeing and having a sense of purpose. The registered manager promoted the visions and values of the service by embedding an open and honest culture. Staff felt supported in their role and had formed good working relationships. Quality assurance systems in place, monitored the service effectively and drove improvements when they were needed.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the Care Quality Commission website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

At the last inspection this service was rated Good, (published 08 February 2017).

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 12 January 2017

During a routine inspection

Westbridge House Rehabilitation Unit is situated close to the centre of Barton on Humber. The home is registered to provide care and accommodation for up to 22 people. The home provides care for those with needs relating to their mental health and misuse of drugs and alcohol.

This unannounced inspection took place on 12 January 2017. The last inspection of the service took place in July 2014. The service was rated as good overall and was compliant with all of the regulations we assessed at that time.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People who used the service were protected from abuse and avoidable harm by staff who had been trained to recognise the signs of potential abuse and knew what action to take if they suspected abuse had occurred. Accidents and incidents were investigated as required and known risks were recorded and mitigated when possible. Staff had been recruited safely and relevant checks were completed before they commenced working within the service. People were supported to self-medicate when possible and appropriate systems were in place to order, store and administer medicines safely.

People were supported by staff who had the skills and experience to carry out their roles effectively. Staff received effective levels of support, supervision and mentorship. People who used the service were supported to make their own decisions about aspects of their daily lives. The principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 were followed when there were concerns people lacked capacity and important decisions needed to be made. People were encouraged to maintain a healthy lifestyle and eat a balanced diet. People’s holistic healthcare needs were met by a range of healthcare professionals.

People’s needs were met by caring, patient and considerate staff. The staff team had worked within the service for a number of years which meant they knew people well and had built a trusting and supportive relationship with the people who used the service. People were treated with dignity and respect by staff and encouraged to express their views. Staff supported people to set and achieve goals which enhanced their independence.

People were provided with an outstanding range of activities and were encouraged to undertake meaningful occupations. The registered manager developed an activity calendar for each month of the year that celebrated different events. People were consistently asked about the activities that were offered and given the opportunities to suggest anything that they wanted to do. The registered manager told us they believed keeping people stimulated had a positive effect on their general and mental health. We noted that the atmosphere within the service was calm and relaxed. People who used the service happily spent time in each other’s company.

People were involved with the initial and on-going planning of their care. Their levels of independence and individual strengths and abilities were recorded. People were encouraged to maintain relationships with important people in their lives and to follow their hobbies and interests. The registered provider had a complaints policy which was displayed within the service. We saw that very few complaints had been received since the service became registered with the CQC.

People who used the service and staff contributed to the development and management of the service. Meetings were held regularly and people’s comments were listened to and implemented to improve the service when possible. A quality assurance system was in place that consisted of audits, checks and feedback from people who used the service. When shortfalls were identi

Inspection carried out on 8 July 2014

During a routine inspection

We carried out this unannounced inspection under Section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 as part of our regulatory functions. This inspection was planned to check whether the provider is meeting the legal requirements and regulations associated with the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and to pilot a new inspection process being introduced by CQC which looks at the overall quality of the service.

Westbridge House is situated close to the centre of Barton on Humber. The home is registered to provide care and accommodation for up to 22 people. The home provides care for those with needs relating to their mental health and misuse of drugs and alcohol. People may also have a learning disability or autistic spectrum disorder or be detained under the Mental Health Act.

The last inspection of this service was December 2013  when there were no breaches of regulation. 

There was a registered manager in post.  A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service and has the legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the law; as does the provider.

At the time of our visit there were 17 people living in the home. The registered manager told us that people living in the home all received support with mental health needs. No-one was receiving support with the misuse of drugs or alcohol or had been detained under the Mental health Act.

CQC monitors the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) which apply to care homes. DoLS are part of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA 2005) legislation which is in place for people who are unable to make decisions for themselves. The legislation is designed to make sure any decisions are made in the person’s best interest. No-one in the home had been supported with DoLS as everyone had been assessed as being able to make decisions without this support.

People were supported with any risk in their lives. They were consulted about restrictions placed on them but actions were not in place to reduce these.  We found there was adequate staffing in place to help meet people’s needs. People received the correct support with their medication and were happy with this.

Some areas of the home were not clean and did not protect people from the risk of infection. This included dirty floors and a blocked sink.

People were supported by staff who were aware of their needs and who treated them with respect. Interactions with staff were positive and people were happy with the support given by staff. Staff had received training to be able to fully support people.

People’s dietary and health needs were met in the home. People were supported to attend appointments to help ensure these needs were met.

People were involved in decisions about their care. They could choose how to spend their time and could access the local community. People were supported to maintain relationships. Friends and relatives could visit or telephone the home as they wished.

People were kept informed of any changes in the home. They were supported to raise concerns and felt the manager was approachable.

Management systems were in place to check people received the correct support and their needs were met. Audits were undertaken and people were consulted about the home.

Inspection carried out on 18 November 2013

During a routine inspection

People who used the service were involved in their care and running of the home. People told us, “I know I have a care plan and I can change it if I don’t like what’s written about me.” Another said, “We have meetings about my care and the nurse and consultant come as well.” People also told us residents’ meetings were held where they could comment about the running of the home. One person told us, “Yes I feel involved in the home. It’s the only place where I’ve felt like the staff genuinely listen to you and take notice of what you say.”

Information was available for staff to follow to ensure people’s needs were met. This information was held securely and updated regularly.

People were provided with a varied and nutritional diet. Comments included, “The food is great”, “There is always plenty of choice” and “I really enjoy my meals.”

The provider had recruitment policies and procedures in place which ensured people were not exposed to staff who should not be working with vulnerable people. People who used the service were involved in the recruitment and selection of prospective employees.

People could make complaints and these would be listened to and acted upon. People told us, “I would go the manager, she’s really good and will sort it out”, “I would see the manager” and “We are asked at the residents meetings if we have any complaints and these are looked into.”

Inspection carried out on 11 December 2012

During a routine inspection

We found written evidence in care plans that people who used the service had signed to agree to the care and treatment provided. The people we spoke with could not remember if they had a care plan or if they had signed an agreement to their care. However they were all satisfied with the care they received and felt they were able to express their wishes and that these were taken into account. They told us they were “Well cared for.” One person said “I have got better, I couldn’t do anything for myself and now I do most things.”

We saw that staff involved people in meaningful activities throughout the day and there was a very lively and happy atmosphere within the home. One person told us “There is plenty going on and I get out regularly.”

We found appropriate arrangements were in place in relation to obtaining and disposal of medicines, and administration and the recording of medicine. People we spoke with told us that they received their medicines when they needed them.

We found that staff received appropriate training and support. People who used the service told us they liked the staff and they said their needs were met. They told us “I am well looked after" and “The staff are very nice.”

People told us they were consulted about events in the home. We also found the views of people who used the service were sought through regular meetings and questionnaires.

Inspection carried out on 6 February 2012

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

People we spoke with were very positive about the care and support they received. They told us they liked living at the home and confirmed they were supported to make choices and decisions about the care they received. They told us they were assisted to be as independent as possible. Comments included “I like living here, I get on well with my key worker, “The manager has been very supportive and has been to all the meetings with me” and “I am very happy here.”

Inspection carried out on 7 November 2011

During a routine inspection

People we spoke with were very positive about the care and support they received. They told us they liked living at the home and confirmed they were supported to make choices and decisions about the care they received. They told us they were assisted to be as independent as possible. Comments included “It’s good, I like it living here” and “You are able to do what you want and I get a bath when I ask for one”.

They told us they were well cared for and were very happy with the activities available to them. Comments included “I have improved and I am able to do things for myself now”, “I am well looked after” and “There are plenty of activities”.

They told us they they felt safe and that they liked the staff.