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Westbridge House Rehabilitation Unit Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 10 February 2017

Westbridge House Rehabilitation Unit is situated close to the centre of Barton on Humber. The home is registered to provide care and accommodation for up to 22 people. The home provides care for those with needs relating to their mental health and misuse of drugs and alcohol.

This unannounced inspection took place on 12 January 2017. The last inspection of the service took place in July 2014. The service was rated as good overall and was compliant with all of the regulations we assessed at that time.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People who used the service were protected from abuse and avoidable harm by staff who had been trained to recognise the signs of potential abuse and knew what action to take if they suspected abuse had occurred. Accidents and incidents were investigated as required and known risks were recorded and mitigated when possible. Staff had been recruited safely and relevant checks were completed before they commenced working within the service. People were supported to self-medicate when possible and appropriate systems were in place to order, store and administer medicines safely.

People were supported by staff who had the skills and experience to carry out their roles effectively. Staff received effective levels of support, supervision and mentorship. People who used the service were supported to make their own decisions about aspects of their daily lives. The principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 were followed when there were concerns people lacked capacity and important decisions needed to be made. People were encouraged to maintain a healthy lifestyle and eat a balanced diet. People’s holistic healthcare needs were met by a range of healthcare professionals.

People’s needs were met by caring, patient and considerate staff. The staff team had worked within the service for a number of years which meant they knew people well and had built a trusting and supportive relationship with the people who used the service. People were treated with dignity and respect by staff and encouraged to express their views. Staff supported people to set and achieve goals which enhanced their independence.

People were provided with an outstanding range of activities and were encouraged to undertake meaningful occupations. The registered manager developed an activity calendar for each month of the year that celebrated different events. People were consistently asked about the activities that were offered and given the opportunities to suggest anything that they wanted to do. The registered manager told us they believed keeping people stimulated had a positive effect on their general and mental health. We noted that the atmosphere within the service was calm and relaxed. People who used the service happily spent time in each other’s company.

People were involved with the initial and on-going planning of their care. Their levels of independence and individual strengths and abilities were recorded. People were encouraged to maintain relationships with important people in their lives and to follow their hobbies and interests. The registered provider had a complaints policy which was displayed within the service. We saw that very few complaints had been received since the service became registered with the CQC.

People who used the service and staff contributed to the development and management of the service. Meetings were held regularly and people’s comments were listened to and implemented to improve the service when possible. A quality assurance system was in place that consisted of audits, checks and feedback from people who used the service. When shortfalls were identi

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 10 February 2017

The service was safe.

People who used the service were protected from abuse and avoidable harm by staff who had been trained to recognise signs of potential abuse.

Staff had been recruited safely and were deployed in suitable numbers to meet the needs of the people who used the service.

People were encouraged to take positive risks in their daily lives and action had been taken to maintain their safety.

People received their medicines as prescribed. Medicines were ordered, stored and administered safely.

Effective

Good

Updated 10 February 2017

The service was effective.

Staff had completed relevant training and received one to one support, supervision and mentorship.

People or their appointed representative provided consent before care, treatment and support was provided.

People ate a healthy and balanced diet of their choosing.

People holistic needs were met by a range of healthcare professionals.

Caring

Good

Updated 10 February 2017

The service was caring.

It was clear staff had built positive and supportive relationships with the people who used the service.

People were treated with dignity and respect by staff.

Staff knew people’s goals and supported and encouraged people to achieve them.

Responsive

Good

Updated 10 February 2017

The service was responsive.

An outstanding number and variation of activities was provided to the people who used the service. People were encouraged to undertake meaningful occupations and had small duties in the home which raised the self-esteem.

People or their appointed representative were involved with the planning and reviews of their care.

A complaints policy was displayed with the service. No complaints had been received since our last inspection.

Well-led

Good

Updated 10 February 2017

The service was well-led.

There was a quality assurance system in place which consisted of audits, checks and feedback provided by people who used the service.

Staff confirmed registered manager was approachable and encouraged people to be actively involved in developing the service.

The registered manager was aware of their responsibilities to report notifiable events to the Care Quality Commission as required.