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We are carrying out a review of quality at Your Life (Lymington). We will publish a report when our review is complete. Find out more about our inspection reports.

Reports


Inspection carried out on 4 April 2018

During a routine inspection

The inspection of this service took place on 4 April 2018 and was announced.

Your Life (Lymington) provides care and support to people living in specialist ‘extra care’ housing. Extra care housing is purpose-built or adapted single household accommodation in a shared site or building. People’s care and housing are provided under separate contractual agreements. CQC does not regulate premises used for extra care housing; this inspection looked at people’s personal care and support service.

There were 42 individual apartments within the building. There was an office base and staff provided people with a range of services including, personal care, medicines management and cleaning services. At the time of the inspection four people were receiving care and support.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe when staff were in their homes and the staff called at the expected times which helped to make them feel safer.

People were safe because staff understood their role and responsibilities to keep them safe from harm. Staff had received training to deliver care safely and to an appropriate standard.

Staff had a good knowledge of the provider’s whistleblowing policy and procedures which meant they were able to raise concerns to protect people from unsafe care.

People were supported by staff that promoted their independence, respected their dignity and maintained their privacy.

Care plans reflected people's individual needs and preferences and were regularly reviewed to ensure that they continued to meet people's needs.

Risks to people had been assessed and reviewed regularly to ensure people’s individual needs were being met safely.

Recruitment processes were robust to make sure people were cared for by suitable staff. There were sufficient numbers of staff deployed to meet people’s needs and to keep them safe from harm.

Staff understood the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and their responsibilities to ensure that people who were unable to make their own decisions about their care and support were protected.

There was an effective complaints system in place. People told us they were confident to raise any issues about their care and that they would be listened to and addressed.

People told us the service was well-led and managed by an effective and organised management team.

Systems were in place to monitor and improve the quality of the service provided.

Inspection carried out on 18 February 2016

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 18 February 2016 and was announced.

Your Life (Lymington) is a domiciliary care service providing care and support to people living in their own homes within an assisted living complex at Farringford Court, Lymington. At the time of our inspection there were eight people using the service.

The service has a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe and were confident in the staff that provided their care and supported them.

Care plans gave clear instructions on how people's care needs were to be met.

People were safe because staff understood their role and responsibilities to keep the safe from harm.

Staff had a good knowledge of the provider’s whistleblowing policy and procedures which meant they were able to raise concerns to protect people from unsafe care.

Recruitment processes were robust to make sure people were cared for by suitable staff. There were sufficient numbers of staff deployed to meet people’s needs and to

keep them safe from harm.

People were supported by staff who received regular training, support and supervision to help them provide effective care.

There were clear procedures in place for the administration of medicines. Audits were carried out monthly by the registered manager to ensure medicines were being administered safely.

Staff understood the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and their responsibilities to ensure that people who were unable to make their own decisions about their care and support were protected.

People had good relationships with the staff and were treated with dignity and respect. They knew how to make a complaint and were confident that concerns would be addressed.

There were systems in place to monitor the care provided and people’s views and opinions were sought regularly. Incidents and accidents were monitored, trends identified and learning shared with staff to put into practice

There was an effective complaints system in place. People told us they were confident to raise any issues about their care and that they would be listened to and addressed.

People told us the service was well-led and managed by an effective and organised management team. People had confidence in the provider and staff were clear about

their roles and responsibilities.

Inspection carried out on 15 May 2014

During a routine inspection

Your Life (Lymington) provides personal care to people living in their own homes within an extra care housing development. At the time of the inspection they were providing care to 11 people.

When we visited there was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service and shares the legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the law with the provider.

People told us they were well cared for and their needs were met at times that were convenient to them. People, and their relatives, felt involved in their care and told us they were able to talk with staff and the registered manager about any concerns they had.

Staff received the support and training they needed in order to carry out their duties to a good standard.

Staff we spoke with demonstrated an understanding of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and how to apply the principles of the Act. The Act protects the rights of people who are not able to make decisions about their care or treatment.

Management of the home was good and we found there was a positive relationship between staff and management. People living in the home and relatives also spoke very highly of the registered manager.

Inspection carried out on 1 October 2013

During a routine inspection

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. The registered manager told us that consent was obtained from people using the service or their representatives during discussions about the care and support people needed. This was confirmed by the people we spoke with, and from our review of records.

People's needs were assessed and care was planned and delivered in line with their individual care plan. The registered manager said that when people were referred to the service an assessment of their needs was carried out. This helped to ensure that the agency would be appropriate for them. One person who used the service said: �I�m so glad we chose them" All the care workers are very nice and respectful. Nothing is too much trouble for them� Another person said "I get everything that is required" and another said "I am happy with the service".

Appropriate arrangements were in place in relation to the recording of medicine. We looked at samples of the medicine administration records (MAR), which kept a record of medicines that staff had supported people to take. The MAR had been completed in line with the procedures.

There were effective recruitment and selection processes in place. Interview records and results were on file and staff had been given written terms and conditions of employment and job descriptions. Care workers we spoke with were clear about the aims of the service and their responsibilities within it. They told us about the induction process for new staff and on-going training for all staff. We saw records that demonstrated that care workers had completed a range of training suitable to their role.

We saw that the provider carried out monthly checks and audits of the service. We looked at audits that had been completed during the past six months which showed the sevice had systems in place to review the quality of service provision.

Inspection carried out on 9 January 2013

During a routine inspection

At the time of our inspection the provider offered care to six people in a supported living environment in Lymington where the service is located.

We visited three people in their own homes. They told us that care staff addressed them in the way they wished and were always polite and respected their choices about the way that care was delivered. One person told us "I always know what's going on, because they say what they are doing".

All of the people we spoke with confirmed that they received care that was personalised and met their individual needs. One person told us �I can live my life my way here in my own home and the help and the care I receive means just that�.

We saw that the agency had written policies and procedures in relation to safeguarding vulnerable people. The registered manager told us that all staff attended safeguarding basic awareness training and this was followed by refresher courses. We saw a sample of staff training records and the training programme, which reflected this.

Staff told us they felt the staffing levels were correct and that they were able to provide cover for each other in the event of leave.

The people we spoke with knew how to make a complaint but had not needed to do so. They told us that the agency responded promptly to any questions they asked. All the people we spoke with made positive comments about the service they received from the agency.