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Dalesview Partnership Domiciliary Care Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 22 October 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Dalesview partnership domiciliary care is registered to provide personal care to people with learning disabilities or autistic spectrum disorder in their own homes in Lancashire. At the time of the inspection the service supported nine people at three addresses in the Chorley area.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People's experience of using this service and what we found

People were protected from the risk of abuse and avoidable harm by staff who understood how to recognise and respond to concerns. People’s representatives told us staff were available when they needed them and they felt their relatives were safe. One relative said, “I worried about her having to leave home from being a teenager, if I had known what I know now, I wouldn't have worried about her being safe with other people. It's not just what I was hoping for, it's much, much better.” The environment was clean and well maintained. People were safely supported to receive their medicines, as prescribed.

People's needs were assessed, and care and support had been planned in partnership with them. People were provided with a nutritious and varied diet. Staff had received regular training and supervision to support them to meet people's needs. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. People told us staff were kind, caring, attentive and treated them with dignity and respect.

People received person-centred care which was responsive to their needs and communication was tailored around individuals. The registered manager addressed people's concerns and relatives told us they felt listened to. The registered manager worked in partnership with a variety of agencies to ensure people received all the support they needed. People were happy with how the service was managed. Staff felt well supported by the registered manager who visited regularly. The registered manager completed regular audits and checks, which ensured appropriate levels of quality and safety were maintained at the home.

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence. The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was good (published 27 May 2017)

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our reinspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 27 April 2017

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 27 April 2017. We gave the service short notice of the inspection. This was because we needed to be sure the registered manager would be available during the inspection.

Dalesview Partnership domiciliary care is registered to provide personal care to people for people with a learning disabilities or autistic spectrum disorder and younger adults in their own homes in Lancashire. The office is based in Clayton le Woods where staff have access to the management of the service along with training facilities. At the time of our inspection the service supported four people in one address.

The service had registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the last inspection on 22 July 2014 the service was rated as good overall and was meeting the regulatory requirements relevant at that time. During this inspection we found the service was meeting the requirements of the current legislation.

Effective systems were in place for recruitment, selection and training for staff. We saw appropriate numbers of staff in place to meet people’s individual needs.

Staff we spoke with understood their responsibilities when dealing with allegations of abuse. Relatives we spoke with told us they had no concerns about the safety of their family members.

Medicines and risks were managed safely in the service. Where identified risks were noted we saw evidence of actions taken to mitigate any risk.

Care files were detailed, clear and provided information for staff to follow to ensure people’s individual needs were met.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

There was a comprehensive and robust activities programme in place to ensure people lived enriched and fulfilled lives. We observed people who used the service were treated with dignity and respect at all times by staff during our visit to their home.

There was evidence of meal plans and choices in place to meet people’s individual choices of meals. Where special diets were required we saw staff accommodated these in the menu planning and shopping for food. Where people required the involvement of health professionals we saw referrals and assessments had taken place.

We received positive feedback about the leadership and management of the service from staff and relatives of people in receipt of care. There was evidence of regular audits and monitoring taking place and records confirmed feedback from relatives, visiting professionals and staff was obtained.

Inspection carried out on 22 July 2014

During a routine inspection

We carried out this inspection under Section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 as part of our regulatory functions. This inspection was planned to check whether the provider is meeting the legal requirements and regulations associated with the Health and Social Care Act 2008, and to provide a rating for the service under the Care Act 2014.

We last visited this service on 13 June 2013 and found all the outcomes we inspected to be compliant. This was an announced inspection.

Dalesview Partnership Domiciliary Care is registered to provide personal care. It is a supported living service which provides care and support to four people all of whom lived at the same location.

Prior to the visit we spoke with one health care professional that had visited the service and a local authority commissioner of the service. During our inspection we spoke with the registered manager, the deputy manager and three staff members. Following our inspection we spoke with a further three staff members and relatives of two people using the service.

There was a registered manager for the service who had been in place since July 2011. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service and has the legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the law; as does the registered provider.

Families of people using the service told us they felt their family members were safe. All staff we spoke with were able to tell us appropriate actions to take if they suspected abuse had taken place. All were aware of the company’s whistleblowing policy and were confident that they could raise any concerns to the registered manager.

One member of staff was able to discuss the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards [DoLS] and its relationship to people using service. Deprivation of liberty does not apply within a domiciliary care setting however if any restrictions that amounted to a deprivation were in place these would need to be authorised by the Court of Protection.

There were systems in place to ensure people who used the service were cared for by staff who were supported and received supervision. Staff we spoke with confirmed regular supervision was taking place and we saw evidence of recent supervision sessions which had taken place. We saw that staff were caring and responsive to people’s needs. Evidence that staff had attended training on topics such as dignity and choice was seen.

People using the service were offered choices. For example people were offered trips out, meals and could choose what they wanted to wear. We saw meals were nutritious and attractively presented.

We found care records were individualised and provided information for staff about how they should respond to peoples’ needs. There was evidence of reviews taking place with resources such as voice recording and DVDs used to aid the involvement of people using the service in these reviews. Family members told us they were happy with the care their relatives received.

Meaningful and individualised activities were taking place. Staff gave examples of activities such as swimming, shopping, the theatre and trampolining that were taking place. Family members of people using services told us activities were taking place in the service and that these were tailored to people’s individual needs.

The service had a quality monitoring and audit system in place. The registered manager told us weekly checks took place and, where necessary, actions would be taken as a result of these.

Inspection carried out on 13 June 2013

During a routine inspection

We met all the people who used the service during our inspection. Whilst they did not give us any specific views about the service they received, we saw that they appeared to be very happy and relaxed in their surroundings and got along extremely well with their support staff.

We made contact with some parents of people who used the service to discuss their views. In general, the feedback we received was extremely positive and people expressed satisfaction with the standard of care and support provided.

Comments included;

‘’We feel lucky to have the service. We couldn’t ask for better.’’

‘’(Name removed) is always very happy and is so well cared for!’’

‘’I visit very regularly and don’t arrange it. I just go and I’m always happy with how I find him.’’

Another parent told us that they had previously identified some concerns about the care their loved one had received but told us that they felt the manager had been very responsive and dealt with their concerns effectively.

During this inspection we looked at how the provider promoted people's welfare and safety and processes for the management of people’s medication. We examined how the provider ensured that any staff recruited were suitable to work with vulnerable people. In addition, we looked at processes used by the provider to monitor quality and deal with any concerns or complaints. We found the provider to be compliant with all the areas we assessed.

Inspection carried out on 2 May 2012

During a routine inspection

At the time of our visit there were only three people using the service and only one person available to see us, the other tenants were out enjoying activities in the community. The person we met wasn’t able to tell us her specific views about the service, but we saw that she appeared comfortable and relaxed in her surroundings.

We made contact with some parents of people who use Dalesview services. Everyone we spoke with expressed satisfaction with the standard of care provided for their son or daughter.

‘’We are absolutely delighted’’ commented one parent, ‘’we couldn’t ask for anything more.’’ Another person said ‘’We are happy with the way (name removed) is looked after and I find all the staff absolutely lovely.’’