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Reports


Inspection carried out on 29 August 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

30a Charlton Road is a care home providing accommodation and personal care support for up to four people with learning and physical disabilities. At the time of the inspection the home was providing care and support to four people.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them. There were deliberately no identifying signs, intercom, cameras, industrial bins or anything else outside to indicate it was a care home. Staff were also discouraged from wearing anything that suggested they were care staff when coming and going with people.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People and their relatives gave us positive feedback about their safety and told us that staff treated them well. The provider had a policy and procedure for safeguarding adults and the registered manager and staff understood what abuse was, the types of abuse, and the signs to look for. Risk assessments and management plans were completed for people and the home environment to ensure safety. There was a system to manage accidents and incidents and to reduce them happening again. People were supported by effectively deployed staff. There were effective recruitment and selection procedures in place to ensure people were safe and supported by staff that were suitable for their roles. People received their prescribed medicine and were protected from the risk of infection.

People’s needs were assessed to ensure these could be met by the service. Where appropriate, staff involved relatives in this assessment. The provider trained staff to support people and meet their needs. Staff supported people to eat and drink enough and to maintain good health. The provider worked with other external professionals to ensure people received effective care. People’s capacity to consent to their care and support was documented.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

Staff supported people and showed an understanding of equality and diversity and people were treated with dignity, and their privacy was respected. People and their relatives were involved in the planning and review of their care and people were supported to be as independent as possible.

Care plans were person centred and contained information about people’s personal life and social history, their health and social care needs. The provider had a clear policy and procedure for managing complaints and this was accessible to people and their relatives in a format that met their needs.

The provider had a policy and procedure to provide end-of-life support to people. However, people did not require end-of-life support at the time of the inspection. The provider had systems and process in place to monitor the quality of the service. The registered manager and staff worked well together as a team. People who used the service completed satisfaction surveys and the results were positive. The registered manager remained committed to working in partnership with other agencies and services to promote the service and to achieve positive outcomes for people.

The service applied the principles and values consistently of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possibl

Inspection carried out on 17 February 2017

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 17 February 2017 and was unannounced. 30a Charlton Road is a care home that provides accommodation and personal care support for up to four people with learning and physical disabilities. At the time of the inspection the home was providing care and support to four people. At our last inspection 17 November 2014 the service was rated good. At this inspection we found the service remained good.

The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Most of the people using the service could not communicate their views to us verbally. We contacted some of their family members for their views about the care provided to their relatives. They told us their relatives were safe and that staff treated them well. Safeguarding adult’s procedures were robust and staff understood how to safeguard the people they supported from abuse. There was a whistle-blowing procedure available and staff said they would use it if they needed to. Appropriate recruitment checks took place before staff started work. Risks to people were assessed and support plans and risk assessments provided clear information and guidance for staff on how to support people to meet their needs. People’s medicines were managed appropriately and people received their medicines as prescribed by health care professionals.

Staff had completed training specific to the needs of the people they supported and they received regular supervision and annual appraisals of their work performance. People were provided with sufficient amounts of nutritional food and drink to meet their needs and staff knew how to support people with eating and drinking. People had access to a GP and other health care professionals when they needed them. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff support them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were provided with appropriate information about the service. This ensured they were aware of the standard of care they should expect. People and their relatives, where appropriate, had been involved in planning for their care needs. There was a range of appropriate activities for people to partake in if they wished to. There was a complaints procedure in place in a format that people could understand. Relatives were aware of the complaints procedure and said they were confident their complaints would be fully investigated and action taken if necessary.

The provider recognised the importance of regularly monitoring the quality of the service provided to people. People were enabled to express their views and opinions about the service. Staff said they enjoyed working at the service and they received good support from the registered manager. There was an out of hours on call system in operation that ensured management support and advice was always available when staff needed it.

Inspection carried out on 17 November 2014

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 17 November 2014 and was unannounced.  At our previous inspection 19 June 2013, we found the provider was meeting the regulations in relation to outcomes we inspected.

30a Charlton Road is a care home that provides accommodation and personal care support for up to up to four people with learning and physical disabilities.  At the time of the inspection the home was providing care and support to four people. There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People using the service and their relatives said people were safe and that staff treated them well. Safeguarding adults procedures were robust and staff understood how to safeguard the people they supported. There was a whistle-blowing procedure available and staff said they would use it if they needed to.

People using the service and their relatives said staff knew them or their relatives well and knew what they needed help with. People using the service had been involved in the care planning process. People’s relatives, care managers and appropriate healthcare professionals had been involved in the care planning process. Risks to people using the service were assessed and care plans, risk assessments and behaviour support plans provided clear information and guidance to staff.

The service had a complaints procedure that was available in words and pictures for people using the service. Relatives said they knew about the service’s complaints procedure and they were certain the manager would listen to them and deal with their concerns appropriately.

The provider took into account the views of people using the service or their relatives acting on their behalf, and staff through surveys. They recognised the importance of regularly monitoring the quality of the service provided to people using the service. Staff said they enjoyed working at the home and they received good support from the manager.

Inspection carried out on 19 June 2013

During a routine inspection

Using the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI) we observed people using the service showing signs of happiness, enjoyment, relaxation and pleasure. Staff demonstrated affection and provided security and comfort to people using the service. The atmosphere was relaxed, and support workers treated people as full and equal partners in the service being provided. Support workers assessed the level of support people required and provided it while recognising and encouraging people�s own skills and achievements.

We found arrangements were in place for obtaining people�s consent to treatment and care, and for acting in people�s best interests. People experienced care and treatment that met their needs and kept them safe. They were protected from the risks of unsafe premises and there were enough staff to meet their needs. A system was in place for monitoring the quality and safety of the service people received.

Inspection carried out on 20 November 2012

During a routine inspection

On the day of the inspection there were four people using the service.

We were able to speak with the majority of people living at the home.

However all were challenged with regard to their communication therefore

observation was used during this inspection.

The home was warm, clean and had a relaxed and friendly atmosphere.

There was a support worker and a home leader on duty with the registered manager supervising.

Observation and interviews showed us that staff were kind and respected their privacy.

We observed staff supporting people in a friendly and professional way and saw that

people were being offered choice with regard to menus, activities and care preferences.

People who use the service seemed positive about the care and treatment they received at

the home.

Interviews with staff and care plans also told us they had good access to health care

professionals such as doctors, district nurses, dentists and speech and language therapists.

People who use the service indicated to us that they felt safe at the home. They told us

they had no concerns about their care.