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Craegmoor Supporting You in the South Peninsula Good

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 2 January 2020

During a routine inspection

About the service

Craegmoor Supporting You in the South West is a supported living service. At the time of our visit one person was receiving support that included personal care. They lived in a house in a residential area that included shared communal areas.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

There was only one person receiving the service. They were supported by a caring, knowledgeable and committed staff team. The staff team were well led by a senior team committed to promoting person centred care within a framework of robust monitoring and developments. There were systems in place to monitor standards and plan continual improvements.

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence.

The outcomes for the person using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. The person’s support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

The person was relaxed in the company of staff. The staff understood their responsibilities and how to protect people from abuse. The staff team had been stable and the person knew the staff who supported them.

The person was supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. Staff respected people’s choices and preferences.

The person was supported by staff who knew them well and were kind and compassionate. Staff were happy in their jobs and wanted to provide the best care they could. The person and their relatives had built strong relationships with staff and appreciated the familiarity they had.

The person was supported to eat and drink safely and their preferences were reflected in the food available.

The person was supported to fill their time with things they found enjoyable and/or meaningful. They were supported to maintain important relationships.

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was requires improvement (published January 2019).

The provider completed an action plan after the last inspection to show what they would do and by when to improve. At this inspection we found improvements had been made and the provider was no longer in breach of regulations.

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up: We will continue to monitor intelligence we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If any concerning information is received, we may inspect sooner.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Inspection carried out on 21 November 2018

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 21 and 22 November 2018, both days were announced.

When we last inspected the service in May 2016 we rated the service Good.

We gave the provider 48 hours' notice because we needed to be sure the manager would be available for the inspection. It also allowed us to arrange to visit people receiving the service.

This service provides care and support to people living in a ‘supported living’ setting, so that they can live in their own home as independently as possible. People’s care and housing are provided under separate contractual agreements. CQC does not regulate premises used for supported living; this inspection looked at people’s personal care and support.

There was not a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The provider had arranged for a manager from one of their other services to oversee this service. This management arrangement had been in place since July 2018.

Some improvement were required to ensure the service fully worked in line with the values and principles of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen. Registering the Right Support CQC policy.

Although people had their own home and made some of their own day to day decisions, we found staff were making some decisions on behalf of people without evidence the person lacked the capacity to make these themselves. Where restrictions were placed on people, for example, the kitchen being locked, there was a lack of evidence that this was the least restrictive option. The manager told us they would review all restrictions in place and ensure these were made in line with the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

People’s communication needs were not always fully met. The manager put plans in place to address this. Although relatives told us there had been some improvements since the new manager had been in post, they had not felt their concerns were listened and responded to.

Some areas of medicines management needed to be improved. Although there were a range of risk assessments in place, we found risks to people were not all identified and mitigated. Incidents were not always recorded and reported in line with the providers policy.

Although staff told us they felt supported in their role, one to one staff supervision had not been held regularly and in line with the providers policy.

Relative raised concerns about staff skills and knowledge to support their family members. The manager had arranged for staff to receive training and had an ongoing plan to ensure this was kept up to date.

Our observations of staff interactions were mixed. Confidentiality was not always respected. Relatives told us they thought most staff wanted to do the best for their family members and some of them were, “Really good” and they were, “Generally lovely.”

The systems in place to monitor the quality and safety of the service were not fully effective.

Relatives thought their family members were safe. There were systems in place to protect people from harm and abuse. Staff knew how to recognise and report abuse and felt confident concerns would be acted upon.

There were enough staff available to meet people’s needs. Recruitment procedures were in place to ensure staff employed were suitable for their role.

People received support from specialist health professionals where relevant. People were involved in the planning and preparing of their meals.

People had individual care plans that identified their needs and preferences.

Inspection carried out on 23 March 2016

During a routine inspection

Craegmoor Supporting You in the Southwest provides personal care and support to people living in their own homes in North Somerset. At the time of this inspection there were five people who received support from the service. The support people received ranged from 15 hours each week to 112 hours each week depending on people’s individual needs. The service provided domiciliary support to people in their own homes and a supported living service. A supported living service is where people have a tenancy agreement with a landlord and receive their care and support from a care provider. As the housing and care arrangements were entirely separate people can choose to change their care provider if they wished without losing their home.

The inspection took place on 23 March 2016 and was announced.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People and their relatives were happy with the support arrangements provided. People told us they felt safe and were treated with respect.

Systems were in place to protect people from harm and abuse and staff knew how to follow them.

The service had systems to ensure medicines were administered and stored correctly and securely. There were enough staff available to keep people safe and meet their needs. A recruitment procedure was in place and staff received pre-employment checks before starting work with the service.

Risk assessments had been carried out and they contained guidance for staff on protecting people. Care plans provided information about how people wished to be cared for and staff were aware of people’s individual care needs and preferences. Reviews of care had been carried out so that people could express their views and experiences regarding the care provided. People and their relatives were involved in the care planning process.

People had access to healthcare services and were supported to attend health appointments.

Staff received training to understand their role and they completed training to ensure the care and support provided to people was safe. New members of staff received an induction which included shadowing experienced staff before working independently. Staff received supervision and told us they felt supported.

People and their relatives thought staff were caring and knew the people they were supporting well.

There were systems in place to receive feedback from people who use the service, staff and relatives. People and relatives were aware of how to raise concerns and they were confident if they raised concerns these would be responded to.

The registered manager and provider had systems in place to monitor the quality of the service. The service had an action plan in place that identified improvements and the progress made against these.