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The Hatch Camphill Community Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 16 July 2019

During a routine inspection

The Hatch is part of Thornleigh Camphill Communities a charity based in the South West of England and is inspired be the work of the international Camphill Movement. The ethos of the service is based on a 'life sharing' model of support. This meant that in some cases staff members and their families lived with the people they supported. People viewed The Hatch as their home and care was based on a 'supported living' model to help them live as independently as possible.

People had tenancy agreements for their home and support plans in respect of the care and support they received. A housing association managed the tenancy agreements. People could choose whether they wanted their care from staff working at The Hatch but could also choose another care provider. At the time of our inspection 30 people with a learning disability were receiving care and support.

There were three houses situated in close proximity of each other St Johns House, Thornbury Cottage and The Hatch House, one a short walk called Watch Oak Lodge and the other in the centre of Thornbury. The main office was separate from the houses but in the grounds of The Hatch.

Not everyone who used the service received personal care. CQC only inspects where people receive personal care. This is help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also consider any wider social care provided.

The service has evolved and been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People received care that was safe, effective, caring and extremely responsive. People and their relatives spoke extremely positively about the support they received. There was sufficient staff to support people who had the necessary skills and commitment to provide care that was extremely person centred. Staff and people lived and worked together as equals and in partnership.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. People had information in a format to suit them as individuals enabling them to make decisions about the care and support they needed.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent. The service was extremely responsive in this area encouraging people to be fully integrated in life at The Hatch and the wider community.

People were supported by staff that were extremely caring in their approach enabling them to lead the life they wanted. This included supporting people to keep in contact with friends and family. People led People were supported to make decisions not only about their care but life at The Hatch. People had a sense of belonging, ownership and a mutual respect for each other.

The service was well led. There were systems to check and monitor the quality. This again involved people, staff, family and other stakeholders.

The service was continually evolving to meet the needs of people enabling them to continue to live the life they wanted. This included keeping under review the extensive range of activities, work experience and the staffing arrangements. Consultation a

Inspection carried out on 7 December 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection was announced and carried out on the 7 and 13 December 2016. The provider was given 48 hours’ notice because the location provides a care service to people living in their own home; we needed to ensure we would be able to meet with people, staff and the registered manager.

The Hatch is part of the Camphill Communities which is an international organisation. The ethos of the service is based on a 'life sharing' model of support. This meant that in some cases staff members and their families lived with the people they supported. People viewed The Hatch as their home and care was based on a ‘supported living' model to help them live as independently as possible. People had tenancy agreements for their home and support plans in respect of the care and support they received. A housing association managed the tenancy agreements. People could choose whether they wanted their care from staff working at The Hatch but could also choose another care provider. At the time of our inspection 29 people with a learning disability were receiving care and support.

There were three houses situated in close proximity of each other St Johns House, Thornbury Cottage and The Hatch House, one a short walk called Watch Oak Lodge and the other in the centre of Thornbury. The main office was separate from the houses but in the grounds of The Hatch.

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People are encouraged to view themselves and others who used the service as being part of a 'community' network, one that not only provides them with care and support, but also access to a range of local facilities relevant to their needs. These included workshops such as woodwork or weavery. There were extensive grounds which people took an active role in growing vegetables. People were able to decide to what extent they wanted to participate in these activities or join in with the wide range of other social activities provided by the service. People were also supported to be part of the wider community and attend colleges and other social events in the local area. People lived and worked alongside each other and were actively involved in the day to day chores of running a home which promoted a sense of community.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Care plans were tailored to the person and provided staff with information to support the person effectively. People had been consulted about their care needs and their views sought about the service. People were supported to make decisions and take proportionate risks. Systems were in place to ensure that complaints and any concerns in respect of abuse were responded to. People had access to other health and social care professionals. People confirmed they could access an advocacy service if they wanted. Safe systems were in place to ensure that people received their medicines as prescribed.

We found the provider had ensured people’s homes were safe and comfortable. The Care Quality Commission’s role in these settings was to focus on the regulated activity of personal care and had no regulatory responsibility to inspect the accommodation for people living in these settings. Environmental risk assessments had been completed.

People were protected from the risk of abuse because there were clear procedures in place to recognise and respond to abuse and staff had been trained in how to follow the procedures. Systems were in place to ensure people were safe including risk management and safe recruitment processes.

Staff were caring and supportive and demonstrated a good understanding of their roles in supporting people. Staff received training and support that was relevant to their roles. Systems w

Inspection carried out on 28 June 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with people who used the service provided by The Hatch. One person said �I really like this place, people who work here are very nice, they are gentle and brilliant�. Another person said �things continue to be okay�. This person said they enjoyed cooking for others in the house, that they decided together what they would have for meals. One person did not like the meal prepared in their house on the day of their visit and chose to have a take away meal.

A co-worker told us they felt that The Hatch offered people �really good opportunities�.

People were involved in the running of the service and were given appropriate information about their tenancy. People�s needs were assessed and they were provided with the support they needed. Appropriate records were maintained. People had active lifestyles with opportunities for employment and activities. Where they were able, people took their medicines with prompts from staff. Other people were supported to take their medicines by staff. There were effective arrangements for the recruitment of staff and monitoring the quality of the service.

Inspection carried out on 3, 8 January 2013

During a routine inspection

One of the people we met told us they liked living at The Hatch describing it as �normal� and �it�s like living at home�. They said they got on well with others in the house and that staff were good. Another person indicated that The Hatch was a good place to live and they looked forward to returning after visiting relatives for Christmas.

One of the staff we met told us they felt things had changed for the better since the new manager was appointed. We met with some visitors. They told us they were very happy with the support their relative was given. They felt the accommodation and support were superior to some they had considered before their relative moved to The Hatch. They said their relative seemed much calmer since the move and always looked forward to returning to The Hatch after holidays with the family. There were a range of tools available for staff to use to enable them, to communicate with people who had limited verbal communication skills. People were encouraged to develop support networks to advocate for them when consent decisions were difficult.

People told us about the way they lived, the activities they participated in and their hobbies. We saw they were supported appropriately by staff and volunteers who had been recruited safely. Staff were supported and had opportunities for training to assist them in their role.

People knew how and to whom they could complain. Complaints were investigated appropriately.

Inspection carried out on 19 July 2011

During a routine inspection

We spoke with five people receiving a service, five members of staff and the manager during our visit.

People told us they liked living in the Hatch. They told us that the staff were supportive and friendly.

People told us that they could choose who supported them with their care including external agencies. People told us they had tenancy agreements and this had been discussed with them and where relevant their families. People told us that they have weekly meetings about life at the Hatch.

People told us their care files were kept in their bedroom and they were involved in decisions about their care.

People described good relationships with each other and staff and said their views on the service were listened too and acted upon.

People told us they felt safe and well supported by the staff working in the home.

People told us they had training in �staying safe� which included areas of moving around the local community safely.