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Burrow Down Community Support Good

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 13 September 2017

During a routine inspection

This inspection was announced and took place on 13 and 14 September 2017. The inspection was carried out by one inspector. We gave the provider short notice to ensure the registered manager (or a suitable deputy) would be available to meet us at the provider’s office, and also to make arrangements for us to visit some of the people in their own home.

Burrow Down Community Support provides a ‘supported living’ service. This is where people live in their own home and receive care and/or support in order to promote their independence. The support that people receive is often continuous and tailored to their individual needs. It aims to enable the person to be as autonomous and independent as possible. There is genuine separation between the care and the accommodation, the care they receive is regulated by CQC, but the accommodation is not. The service is registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) for the provision of personal care in people’s own homes. The service was registered on 7 July 2015 and was well established. It had previously been managed from another location, so this was the first inspection at this location.

At the time of the inspection the service supported 25 people, who had individual tenancy agreements, living in eight houses. Personal care was provided to 15 of these people. People who used the service had varying degrees of support needs, ranging from mild to severe learning and physical disabilities and autistic spectrum conditions. Some people had complex needs and required 24 hour support, whereas others were relatively independent and just needed assistance for a few hours each day. The service also provided other forms of social care support that are not included within CQC’s registration requirements for a supported living service. For example, in addition to personal care, the service also assisted people with their housekeeping, shopping, attending appointments and other independent living skills.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Policies and procedures helped ensure people were protected from the risk of abuse and avoidable harm. Staff had received a range of training and information including safeguarding adults and they were confident they knew how to recognise and report potential abuse.

People’s risk assessments and care plans were clear and contained clear guidance for staff to help them meet people’s support needs safely, according to their wishes and preferences. Staff had a good understanding of people’s individual nutritional needs in line with their care plans. They followed recommendations from health professionals to ensure people’s nutritional needs were met safely.

The service placed a strong emphasis on a ‘person centred approach’, and this was promoted throughout the service. Staff respected people’s privacy and dignity. They promoted their ability to make decisions about their lives, and how they wanted their support to be provided. People’s communication needs were catered for to ensure they were able to participate fully and make meaningful choices. Care plans contained clear guidance for staff to help them support people to maintain as much independence as they were able and achieve their personal goals.

Where people needed assistance or prompting to take their medicines, systems were in place to ensure they received their prescribed medicines safely. Where necessary, people were also supported to access other health and social care professionals to maintain good health and well-being.

Staff were well supported. Managers were very visible and accessible to them and the people they supported. Staff received regular one-