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Brandon Trust Supported Living - Wiltshire Good

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 17 May 2018

During a routine inspection

We inspected Brandon Trust Supported Living – Wiltshire on 17 and 18 May 2018. The inspection was announced. At the time of our inspection Brandon Trust were supporting 12 people who were living in their own homes.

This service provides care and support to people living in eight supported living settings, so that they can live in their own home as independently as possible. People’s care and housing are provided under separate contractual agreements. CQC does not regulate premises used for supported living; this inspection looked at people’s personal care and support.

The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.” Registering the Right Support CQC policy.

There were three registered managers in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At our last inspection we rated the service as good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

People told us they were safe. Staff were knowledgeable and knew how to recognise and report any concerns. Risks to people’s safety were assessed and recorded with guidance for staff on how to manage those risks. Medicines were stored, administered and managed safely.

People were supported by staff who had the training, skills and knowledge to undertake their role effectively. Staff had access to one to one support from their line manager.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service support this practice.

People told us the service was caring. People’s achievements were celebrated in ‘good news stories’. People and staff had developed positive, compassionate and trusting relationships. Care and support plans were person centred. People were treated with dignity, respect and kindness.

People received care which was responsive to their needs and accommodated changes when needed. There were a variety of activities available according to individual likes and dislikes.

The service was well-led. People and their relatives told us they thought the service was well managed and organised. The registered managers had systems in place to audit and monitor the quality of the service. The values of the service were demonstrated throughout the staff group.

Inspection carried out on 11 January 2016

During a routine inspection

This was the first inspection of the service since it was registered at a new address in May 2015. We had last inspected the service in January 2014 at its’ previous address (also in Trowbridge) and found no breaches of regulations. The inspection was announced. We gave the provider 48 hours’ notice of our inspection. We did this to ensure we would be able to meet with people where they were receiving the service.

Brandon Trust Supported Living - Wiltshire provides personal care and support to adults with learning disabilities. The organisation manages services provided to people across Wiltshire from the registered office location. Services are provided to individual people living in their own home, or groups of people living together. The amount of care and support varies from a few hours per day, or week, to people receiving care and support 24 hours a day. At the time of this inspection 11 people were receiving the service.

There were five registered managers in post at the service. A registered manager is a person who has been registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service and has the legal responsibility for meeting the requirements of the law; as does the provider. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe; and their relatives agreed. Comments we received included; “The staff are nice; I’m safe, they’re not nasty.” Another person described the staff as being ‘helpful’ and “are always kind to me.” Staff had received training and were aware of safeguarding procedures. There were sufficient staff to meet people’s needs. People’s medicines were managed safely.

The service was effective because people received care from staff who knew their individual needs. One person explained how “They (the staff) always help me to do everything I want to.”

Staff had received training and showed awareness of issues relating to capacity and consent.

People were supported to eat and drink enough. People were supported to maintain their health and accessed healthcare services.

People received a caring service because positive relationships were developed and people were involved in decision making. People described the staff as being “They’re alright, they’re kind.”

Another person said “I like them all.” Two relatives described the staff as being ‘friendly, very bubbly and easy to get on with.’ Privacy and dignity was promoted and respected.

People received personalised care that was responsive to their needs. People commented positively about the variety of activities people were involved in. People using the service and their relatives were able to raise concerns and were listened to.

People received a service that was well led because the service demonstrated good leadership and management. There were systems in place to monitor the quality of the service.