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Inspection carried out on 18 November 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Grove Park Care Home is a residential care home providing personal care to 78 people aged 65 and over at the time of the inspection. The service can support up to 80 people in one purpose-built building. Grove Park Care Home accommodates people across three separate suites, each of which has separate adapted facilities. One of the suites specialises in providing care to people living with dementia.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People were protected from the risks of abuse and felt safe living at the service. Without exception, people said they were safe and well cared for. One person said, “I feel safe because there is nothing to make you feel unsafe. The staff are very good; very patient.” When accidents or incidents occurred, learning was identified to reduce the risk of them happening again. The registered manager was keen to use this approach to encourage improvements in the service. They had introduced reflective practice logs to embed this way of working in the service. There were enough staff available to provide a timely response to people and provide safe care. People received their medicines as prescribed and medicines were managed safely. Risks were managed well, and people had plans for staff to follow to reduce risk and keep them safe. The home was very clean and well maintained.

People received effective care and support from staff who knew them well and were well trained. Training was based on current research and good practice. This included dementia care and improving wellbeing for people. Staff received regular supervision and an annual appraisal of their role. They spoke highly of this support. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible, the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. Consent to care was gained in line with current legislation. Staff supported people with their healthcare needs and worked well with external healthcare professionals. People's nutritional needs were met, this included any cultural preferences. Most people said they enjoyed the meals and there was enough choice.

People were treated well; with kindness and compassion. Staff respected people’s privacy and dignity and promoted equality and diversity. People and their relatives spoke positively about the staff and the support they or their family member received. Comments included; “Pretty good staff; they are the best. They look after you proper” and “Staff are all very kind.” People were supported to be as independent as possible and the accessible, supportive environment of the home enhanced this.

Care plans supported and guided staff to provide personalised care. There was a programme of activities that were tailored to people's individual preferences. People told us they enjoyed these. The registered manager and staff team placed a high emphasis on making sure people had meaningful lives and their wellbeing was enhanced as much as possible. There was a complaints procedure in place and systems in place to deal with complaints effectively.

The service was well led by a registered manager and a management team who everyone described as approachable. People and their relatives were encouraged to be involved in the running of the service and the provider was open and transparent when things went wrong. Staff were happy in their work and felt well managed and supported. One member of staff said, “It is great to work in such a nice environment, with a great team. It keeps you motivated to do a good job for people.” Systems were in place to monitor the quality of the service and the care provided and actions were taken to continuously improve the service.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

At the previous inspection (published 12 May 2017) the service was rated good.

Why we inspected

Inspection carried out on 12 April 2017

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced inspection carried out on the 12 and 18 April 2017. At the last inspection in March 2016 we found systems in place did not ensure medicines were managed safely and incidents that affected people’s welfare and safety were not always properly investigated. We also found people were not consistently provided with meaningful and stimulating activity. At this inspection we found the provider had made the required improvements.

Grove Park Care Home is situated in the Headingly/Meanwoood area of Leeds. It is a purpose built home with 80 beds; providing care for older people and those living with dementia. All rooms have en-suite facilities. The accommodation is situated on two floors that are serviced by the stairs and a passenger lift. There is level access to the enclosed garden and terrace. The home is located in a residential area close to local amenities and public transport.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe in their home. One person said,; “I absolutely feel safe here." Another person said, “I feel safe and secure here.” Staff had a good understanding of safeguarding vulnerable adults and knew what to do to keep people safe. People had plans in place to manage risks, which staff understood and followed.

There were systems in place to ensure people received their medication safely and as prescribed. Medicines were stored correctly and medication administration record (MAR) charts showed people received their medicines as prescribed. Everyone we spoke with told us they received their medicines when they needed them.

The registered manager and provider had systems in place to make sure staff were recruited safely and there was sufficient staff to meet people's needs. People who used the service said staff were always around and came quickly when called. Recruitment procedures were robust to ensure staff were suitable and fit to be employed at the service.

There were policies and procedures in place in relation to the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005. Staff were trained in the principles of the MCA and could describe how people were supported to make decisions. Where people did not have the capacity, decisions were made in their best interests.

Staff were well trained and supervised which meant they were able to carry out their roles effectively. People received support from staff who showed kindness and compassion. Their dignity and privacy was protected. People told us the staff were kind and friendly. Staff understood people's individual needs in relation to their care. Support plans were person centred and reflected individual's preferences.

People were provided with the food and drink they liked to eat. There were choices available on the menus and alternatives if people didn't like what was on offer. Nutritional risk was assessed and people’s weight was monitored. Health, care and support needs were assessed and met by prompt and regular contact with health professionals.

There were systems in place to ensure complaints and concerns were fully investigated. The registered manager had dealt appropriately with any complaints received.

The registered manager provided clear leadership and management for the staff team to ensure staff understood their roles and what was expected of them.

Effective systems for monitoring quality were in place. A range of checks and audits were undertaken to ensure people's care and the environment of the home were safe and effective.

Inspection carried out on 2 March 2016

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced inspection carried out on the 2 March 2016. This was the first inspection of the service.

Grove Park Care Home is situated in the Headingley/Meanwoood area of Leeds. It is a purpose built home with all rooms having en-suite facilities. The home is spread across three suites with a maximum occupancy of 80. At the time of the inspection the service provided nursing care but this was due to cease shortly after our inspection.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People who used the service were not protected against the risks associated with the unsafe management of medicines. We found some aspects of medicines management were effective and ensured safety and others were not. There were systems in place to record accidents and incidents and monitor for any patterns or trends. However, we found two serious incidents had occurred regarding medication prescribing and administration and a full investigation had not been completed to show how to prevent any re-occurrence of this.

People told us they enjoyed the food and got the support they needed with meals. However, some improvements were needed to ensure the meal time experience was positive for all people who used the service. Records were not always fully completed to monitor and therefore respond to nutritional and hydration risks for people.

People were not consistently provided with meaningful and stimulating activity. People who used the service and their relatives said there needed to be more to do. Some people who used the service said they were not able to access the ‘resident’s’ meetings to air their views on issues that affected the home.

The provider’s system to monitor and assess the quality of service provision was not fully effective. It was not consistently clear that when actions had been identified to improve the service they were always implemented.

People told us they felt safe at the home and there were enough staff to meet their needs. The premises and equipment were well maintained to ensure people’s safety. Staff had a good understanding of safeguarding vulnerable adults and knew what to do to keep people safe.

Staff were recruited appropriately in order to ensure they were suitable to work within the home. They were provided with training and support to develop their knowledge and skills. Most staff were trained in the principles of the MCA and could describe how people were supported to make decisions; and where people did not have the capacity; how decisions were made in their best interests.

People were supported by staff who treated them with kindness and were respectful of their privacy and dignity. Care plans contained information relating to people’s choices and preferences and staff were able to demonstrate they knew people well.

There were systems in place to ensure complaints and concerns were fully investigated and people who used the service and their relatives said they felt confident to talk to staff about any concerns.

At this inspection we found two breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we told the registered persons to take in relation to each of these breaches of the regulations at the end of the full version of this report.