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Parkside (Aldershot & District Learning Disability) Good

The provider of this service changed - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 20 June 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Parkside (Aldershot and District Learning Disability) is a charitable organisation which offers a wide variety of support to people with learning disabilities. These services include a day centre, social clubs, fitness groups, well–being groups and a domiciliary care agency. The CQC only inspects where people receive personal care. This is help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also consider any wider social care provided. The domiciliary care agency is registered for personal care and currently provides a one to one service to three people who live with families or independently. These people receive support to live in their own homes. This support is focussed on meeting people's personal care and/or daily living needs.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People received a service that was safe, effective, caring, responsive and well led.

Systems were in place to keep people safe from the risk of harm and abuse. People’s needs were met by suitable numbers of staff who knew them well. People received their medicines as prescribed and were protected from the risk of infection. Staff were not officially checked for their competency in medicines administration.

We have made a recommendation about recording the completion of staff medicine competency checks.

People using the service received planned person-centred care and support that was appropriate and inclusive for them. The service worked closely with other health professionals to ensure people’s health needs were met.

People were treated with kindness and respect and staff spoke fondly about them. People’s privacy and dignity were respected, and they received personalised care which was responsive to their individual needs.

People enjoyed a range of activities which they chose to do. People had support plans in place which covered a range of information about them, their life histories, preferences, likes and dislikes and their support needs. The provider sought feedback from people and their families to improve the service.

The registered manager had a sound overview of the service and had effective systems in place to monitor safety and quality.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was good (published 7 January 2017)

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 13 December 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 13 December 2016 and was announced.

Parkside (Aldershot and District Learning Disability) is a charitable organisation which offers a wide variety of support to approximately 200 people with learning disabilities. These services include a day centre, social clubs, fitness groups, well–being groups and a domiciliary care agency. The domiciliary care agency is registered for personal care and currently provides a one to one service to16 people. Thirteen people, many of whom live in residential care homes, receive one to one support with daily activities which is the main focus of the care. They are helped with their personal care needs incidentally and if necessary during the course of the activities. Three people receive support to live in their own homes. This support is focussed on meeting people’s personal care and/or daily living needs.

There is a registered manager running the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The service made sure that people, staff and others were as safe as possible whilst using or working in the service. Staff were appropriately trained and followed health and safety and safeguarding procedures. They recognised and managed any risk of harm and were able to identify any form of abuse or poor practice. Robust risk assessments advised staff how to reduce risks, as much as possible. The recruitment procedure checked that staff were safe and suitable to provide people with care.

People were provided with care that met their individual needs, preferences and choices. They were supported and encouraged to make decisions and choices about their care. Staff upheld people’s legal rights with regard to decision making and choice. People’s rights were protected by a management team who understood the Mental Capacity Act (2005). This legislation provides a legal framework that sets out how to act to support people who do not have capacity to make a specific decision.

People’s equality and diversity was respected. People’s diversity was understood and people were treated as individuals. Their care was person centred and reflected any special needs they may have had. People’s privacy and dignity was recognised and promoted by a kind and caring staff team. Staff understood how important it was to maintain people’s privacy and dignity and knew how to do so.

The service and individual staff were highly responsive to people’s needs. The staff team were flexible and their priority was to meet people’s needs, which could change quickly. Staff were able and supported to deal with unplanned care and emergency situations effectively.

The service was well-led by a registered manager who was experienced and well thought of by people and the staff team. Staff were well supported by the management team and their colleagues. The service monitored and assessed the quality of care they offered and made any necessary improvements.