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Eden Supported Services Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 18 September 2019

During a routine inspection

Eden Supported Services is a small residential care home providing personal and nursing care to three people with learning disabilities aged 18 to 65 at the time of the inspection. The service can support up to four people.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service

People were safe in the service. Staff understood how to protect people from abuse. Each person had a risk assessment, which identified possible risks and how to manage them. The service provided enough staff, who were properly recruited, trained, supervised and supported to ensure people received safe care.

Medicines were managed safely ensuring people received their medicines as prescribed by their doctors. Incidents and accidents were monitored, reviewed and learnt from to ensure people were safe.

All parts of the service were clean and staff had attended training in infection control. Staff audited aspects of health and safety at the service to ensure the facilities and equipment were maintained and safe to use.

Relatives told us staff were caring and knew what they were doing. They told us staff ensured people's privacy and dignity was respected.

People enjoyed meals of their choice. However, improvements were required to include more varieties to reflect people's culture and preferences.

Staff supported people to access healthcare. They also provided activities, which ensured people engaged within and outside the care home.

People benefited from care plans, which were person-centred and reviewed regularly. People's relatives were involved and people were supported and encouraged to make decisions about their care. They were supported to have maximum choice and control in their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. The policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

Staff understood equality and diversity. They knew discrimination of any kind was not acceptable. People's communication needs were recorded and staff had experience and knowledge of how to communicate with people effectively. There was a complaints policy in place and relatives told us they knew how to make a complaint.

Relatives were complimentary about staff and management of the service. They had opportunities to give feedback to ensure their views were considered in the service's quality assurance system. Regular audits of various aspects of the service were undertaken.

Rating at last inspection

At the last inspection the service was rated Good (report published on 21 April 2017)

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 28 February 2017

During a routine inspection

This was an announced inspection carried out on 28 February 2017. The registered manager was given an hour’s notice as we needed to be sure that someone would be in to assist with the inspection. The service was previously inspected by the Care Quality Commission in December 2015 and was rated Good. However, we received some concerns from the local authority in December 2016 about the management of the service by the provider and we decided to inspect the service again.

Eden Supported Services provides care and support for up to five adults with learning disabilities. At the time of our visit, there were three people using the service. The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The provider had measures in place to ensure the environment was suitable and safe for people using the service. Staff had access to relevant safeguarding guidance and contact numbers. They were aware of their roles and responsibilities to report any potential safeguarding incidents. Risks to people had been assessed and there was guidance in place on how to manage them safely.

However, we found that people’s financial records were not always adequately maintained. We have made a recommendation to the provider about ensuring there is a more effective system in place to manage people's money.

People's medicines were managed safely by staff working at the service. People received their medicines at the required times and in the way they had been prescribed.

There were sufficient staff available to meet people's needs. Staff received training in a number of relevant areas to ensure they had the skills to meet people's needs.

People's consent was sought where appropriate. Where people lacked the capacity to consent to decisions, legal requirements were met.

People’s records reflected their current health needs. They had access to meet with other healthcare professionals and staff had a good understanding of their needs. They were supported to express their views and to make decisions about their care. This enabled staff to deliver safe care. We have made a recommendation about updating people’s risk assessments to ensure they covered all health concerns that were identified.

People were supported to eat and drink enough and were given choices when planning the menus. People’s care plans were personalised and contained information about all aspects of their life and histories. Staff interacted well with people and respected their privacy and dignity. People were encouraged to take part in household chores and leisure activities. Their independence was promoted.

There was a complaints procedure in place. Staff were able to support people if they wished to complain. We have made a recommendation for the provider to develop more simplified procedures for people. We made further recommendations about ensuring relatives were contacted more frequently to keep them up to date about the progress of their loved ones who lived at the service.

Staff and people told us the management team were supportive, approachable and friendly. There were systems in place to routinely monitor the safety and quality of the service provided.

The management team demonstrated an understanding of their role and responsibilities. They had taken action to address concerns raised by the local authority and by the CQC. The registered manager was being supported by an external consultant.

Inspection carried out on 9 December 2015

During a routine inspection

We inspected Eden Supported Services on 9 December 2015. This was an announced inspection which meant that the provider knew we were visiting. This was because the location was a small care home for adults who are out during the day and we needed to be sure that someone would be in. The provider was given 48 hours’ notice.

Eden Supported Services is a care home that provides accommodation and support with personal care for people with learning disabilities. The service is registered to provide care and support to three people.

The service did not have a registered manager in place at the time of our inspection. The manager of the service was still in the process of completing registration with the Care Quality Commission. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the time of our inspection, there were two people using the service. We found that people were cared for by sufficient numbers of qualified and skilled staff. Staff also received one to one supervision and received regular training. People were supported to consent to care and the service operated in line with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards which meant that their freedom was not restricted. The service had a quality check system in place when staff ended their shift and handed over to the next shift to ensure that medicines were administered safely and recorded accurately. This was particularly important if there was a lot of activity taking place in the service or in pressurised situations.

People were supported to eat and drink sufficient amounts and had choice over what they wanted to eat. People were supported to access healthcare professionals. People’s finances were managed and audited regularly by staff so that people’s money was kept safely and securely.

People’s needs were assessed and care and support was planned and delivered in line with their individual care needs. The support plans contained a good level of information setting out exactly how each person should be supported to ensure their needs were met. The support plans included risk assessments. Staff had good relationships with the people using the service. We observed interactions between staff and people living in the service. Staff were caring and respected people’s wishes and their privacy. Staff supported them to attend meetings where they could express their views. People using the service pursued their own individual activities and interests, with the support of staff. The environment was safe and clear of any health and safety hazards.

There was a structure in place for the management of the service.  People using the service, relatives and visitors could identify who the manager was. People felt comfortable sharing their views and speaking with the manager if they had any concerns. The manager demonstrated a good understanding of their role and responsibilities. Staff and people told us the manager was supportive. There were systems in place to routinely monitor the safety and quality of the service provided.