You are here

Reports


Inspection carried out on 6 December 2017

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 6 and 7 December 2017 and was unannounced on the first day.

Redford Court is a ‘care home’ that also provides a rehabilitation service. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

Redford Court specialises in the rehabilitation, support and care for people who have acquired a brain injury. The Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust (BIRT) and has been developed in partnership with Riverside Housing Association. At the time of our inspection, the service was providing support to 27 people and registered for 29. Redford Court has two floors where people’s rooms are located. There were also rehabilitation rooms where the occupational therapists, speech and language therapists, the neuropsychologist and other professionals support people as required in their person centred care plans.

At the last inspection on the 10 December 2014 the service was rated Good.

There was a registered manager in post. The home is required to have a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

There were enough qualified and experienced staff to meet people's needs and keep them safe. The required checks had been carried out when new staff were recruited and all staff had received induction training when they commenced employment.

We observed that all parts of the home were clean and well maintained and records we looked at showed that regular health and safety checks were carried out. All areas were furnished appropriately and a plan had commenced to redecorate the décor to a good standard.

Medicines were managed safely and records confirmed that people always received the medication prescribed by their doctor.

People’s capacity to make decisions was assessed and where appropriate, applications had been made to the local authority for Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. People are supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service underpinned this practice.

People were mostly happy with their meals and told us that choices were always available.

The members of staff we spoke with had good knowledge of the care and support needs of the people who lived at the home. The staff we met had a cheerful and caring manner and they treated people with respect. People who lived at the home who we spoke with expressed their satisfaction with the care and support provided and with the staff.

The care plans we looked at gave information about people's rehabilitation plans, support and care needs and how their needs were met. They also gave information about people's individual choices and preferences.

There was a friendly, open and inclusive culture in the home and many of the people we met during our visits spoke highly of the staff and the managers. Regular quality audits were completed and a satisfaction survey had been carried out.

Inspection carried out on 10 December 2014, 12 December 2014

During a routine inspection

Redford Court is located in a residential area of Liverpool. It provides support and accommodation for people with acquired brain injury with or without other conditions . It is run by the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust (BIRT) and has been developed in partnership with Riverside Housing Association.

This was an unannounced inspection, carried out over two days on 10 and 12 December 2014. During and following the inspection we spoke with five people who lived in the home, seven visitors, eleven staff and the registered manager of the home.

The service was registered to provide care, treatment and accommodation for 29 people who needed nursing or personal care and currently had 25 people living there. It received referrals mainly from the North West and North Wales, but had cared for people from all over Britain in the past. The service was run in two buildings, across the road from each other. They were purpose built several years ago and were large and airy, with good provision for aids and adaptations. The whole service was known as Redford Court but the smaller building which had six bedrooms, was known as Redford Lodge, or ‘The Lodge’.The main building had at the time of our visit, 20 people living there and The Lodge had five people.

The service required to have a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The home had a registered manager who had been with the service for nine months.

We found that people’s independence was supported by sufficient staff who were trained and were understanding of their needs. We saw that some people had been enabled to move into the community, whilst others remained at Redford Lodge and they told us that they had meaningful and satisfied lives.

The people we spoke with told us they were well cared for, were safe and were happy. Relatives confirmed this and we saw that the staff were an integral part of people’s lives and that they treated people with respect and dignity and valued their individual needs and preferences.

Inspection carried out on 30 July 2013

During a routine inspection

During our visit we spoke in private with four of the people living at Redford Court and held a meeting with a further five people who lived there. We spoke with five members of staff individually and attended part of a meeting in which staff who held different roles discussed the support needs of some of the people living there.

People told us that they had received the support they had needed to meet their care and welfare needs and with their rehabilitation. This was confirmed in the care records we read and discussions we held with staff.

In addition to employing staff who held different professional qualifications, records showed that staff had worked with people living there and other professional’s to meet people’s needs and support them to plan for the future.

The people living at Redford Court told us that they had felt safe living there. They told us that they would have felt comfortable passing any concerns they had to staff and confident staff would support them with these.

We found that people had been provided with the equipment they had needed to support their mobility, personal care and independence. We found that checks had not been carried out on bed rails to ensure their safety. The provider dealt with this issue swiftly following our inspection.

People told us that they liked the staff team and had confidence that they were skilled in supporting them safely. Comments included, “I like them, we have a laugh”, and “I can talk to them.”

Inspection carried out on 7 June 2012

During a routine inspection

We spoke individually with eight of the people living at Redford Court. One person told us “I enjoy myself living here” and another person said “it’s great, can do what you want, almost no restrictions”. People told us that they had been supported to make everyday decisions for themselves and that they liked the staff team.

In discussion people confirmed that they had received the support they needed with their health and personal care and in managing their everyday lives. Everyone we spoke with told us that they felt safe living at Redford Court and felt confident to raise concerns with staff, who they said would help them "to sort it out".

Inspection carried out on 15 July 2011

During a routine inspection

During our visit to Redford Court we spoke in private with a number of the people who live there. We found that people were positive about the service they received and the support they got from the staff team.

People told us that they are supported to make decisions for themselves. For example one person told us, “It’s great living here. Can do what you want. I decide what to do” and explained that staff offered encouragement but they “don’t make you”.

Everyone we spoke with confirmed that they were encouraged to express their views openly. They were of the opinion that these views were taken into account by staff in making decisions about the care and treatment they received. People told us that staff listened to their point of view and offered advice but wherever possible they were enabled to make their own decisions.

People told us that they were able to get involved in a number of activities during the day and that staff were available to support them through this. One person explained, “I am very pleased, one of the best places I have been. Plenty of opportunity to go out”.

In discussions the people living at Redford Court told us that they got the support they needed and wanted with their personal and health care. One person told us, “Staff do everything. I am glad of the staff”, another that, “Staff help you out, they look after you”. They said they were confident staff knew what they were doing and used equipment safely and well. People also told us that they receive a number of therapies including occupational therapy, physiotherapy and hydrotherapy. In addition they got input from a number of other professionals including a speech and language therapist and a Neuro-Psychologist. People also told us that they had no concerns or issues with the way their medication was managed.

We asked people if they felt Redford Court was a safe place to live and if they personally felt safe living there. Everyone we spoke with told us that they did feel safe with one person telling us, "Of course it’s safe. They look after you”. People also told us that staff responded to anyone becoming aggressive or upset calmly and gave advice if needed. People told us that this approach helped them to feel calmer and one person told us that the support they were getting to manage their anger was working well for them.

People told us that they had confidence in the staff team and received the support that they needed from them. Their comments included, “Staff are lovely for what they do for me” and “staff are all good”.

We asked people if they felt staff knew how to do their job safely and well and they told us that in their view staff were competent. One person explained, “very good, best staff, all switched on” and another that “staff know what they are doing”.