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Sunnyside Care Homes Limited - 410-412 High Road Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 30 January 2020

During a routine inspection

About the service

Sunnyside Care Homes Limited - 410-412 High Road is a care home registered to accommodate and support up to seven people with learning disabilities. At the time of the inspection, seven people were living at the home. The service is a two-floor building. Each floor has separate adapted facilities.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service

Care plans contained risk assessments to effectively manage risks and help keep people safe. Pre-employment checks had been carried out to ensure staff were suitable to support people. People told us they felt safe at the home and staff were aware of how to safeguard people from abuse. There were appropriate numbers of staff to support people when required. Medicines were being managed safely.

Staff had completed essential training to perform their roles effectively and felt supported in their roles. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People received care from staff who were caring and had a good relationship with them. Staff respected people’s privacy and dignity. People were encouraged to be independent and to carry out tasks without support.

People received person centred care. Care plans had been reviewed regularly to ensure they were accurate. People participated in activities to support them to develop and maintain relationships to avoid social isolation.

Feedback was sought from people and relatives and this was used to make improvements to the home. Systems were in place for quality assurance.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

At our last inspection on 8 August 2017, the home was rated good (published 1 September 2017).

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 8 August 2017

During a routine inspection

We carried out an unannounced inspection on 8 August 2017 of Sunnyside Care Homes Limited – 410-412 High Road, which is registered to provide accommodation and support with personal care for a maximum of seven people with learning disabilities. At this inspection there were three people living in the home.

At our last comprehensive inspection on 14 and 16 September 2015, we had found a breach of regulation 12 of the Health and Social Care Act (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014, as people had not been cared for in a safe environment and this placed them at risk in the event of a fire. People had not been adequately protected from risks, which resulted in a very serious incident at the home in August 2015. We also found concerns with training, activities and a full time manager not being in post. The home was rated Inadequate under Safe and Requires Improvement overall. We carried out a focused inspection on 20 June 2016 and found improvements had been made in these areas. The home had been rated Requires Improvement to ensure the improvements were sustained. At this inspection, we found the improvements had been sustained and therefore the home has been rated Good.

The home had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the home. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the legal requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and the associated regulations on how the home is run.

Staff were aware of how to identify abuse and knew who to report abuse to within the organisation and outside the organisation.

Risk assessments were in place that provided information on how to minimise risks to keep people safe. Individual fire safety risk assessments were in place to minimise the risk of fires. Regular fire alarms and evacuation tests were being carried out.

Premises safety checks had been carried out by qualified professionals, which included fire safety checks. Monthly safety checks were being carried out by the home. These checks did not highlight concerns.

Medicines were being managed safely. People received their medicines as prescribed. Medicine records were completed accurately and were stored securely.

Pre-employment checks had been carried out to ensure staff were fit and suitable to provide care and support to people safely. There were appropriate staffing levels.

Staff had received training required to perform their roles effectively. People were being cared for by staff who felt supported.

The principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 were being followed. This ensured that people who lacked the mental capacity to consent to their care, treatment and support were being supported to do so in their best interests.

People had the level of support needed to eat and drink enough, and to maintain a balanced diet. People had choices during meal times.

People had access to a range of health care professionals if their health needs changed or they became unwell.

People had a positive relationship with staff. We observed staff were caring.

People were treated in a respectful and dignified manner by staff who understood the need to protect people's human rights.

There was a weekly activities timetable. People participated in activities regularly.

Care plans were person centred and detailed people’s preferences, interests and support needs. People and their relatives were involved with making decisions on their care.

Staff told us there was an open and inclusive culture within the home and the home was well-led.

Quality assurance and monitoring systems were in place for continuous improvements to improve the quality of life for people.

Inspection carried out on 20 June 2016

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

This inspection took place on 20 June 2016 and was unannounced.

We had carried out an unannounced comprehensive inspection of this service on 14 and 16 September 2015 where a breach of legal requirements had been found. We found that systems were not in place to adequately minimise risk and to ensure that people were supported as safely as possible. After the comprehensive inspection the provider wrote to us to say what they would do to meet the legal requirements in relation to the breach.

We undertook this focused inspection to check that they had followed their plan and to confirm that they now met legal requirements. This report only covers our findings in relation to those requirements. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection by selecting the “all reports” link for Sunnyside Care Home on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

Sunnyside Care Home provides accommodation and support with personal care for up to seven people with a learning disability. At the time of our visit three people were living there.

There was no registered manager in post as the previous registered manager was in the process of cancelling their registration and the current manager was in the process of applying to be the new registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers they are registered persons. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Since our last inspection the service had made improvements to raise the quality of care. We found the registered provider had taken sufficient action to ensure that people’s risk assessments were detailed and person centred. People were looked after by staff who had a good understanding of safeguarding.

The manager was well regarded by staff, relatives and people who use the service.

People received care from staff who had regular training and whose knowledge and skills were able to meet people’s needs. We saw staff were supported in supervision meetings with their managers. The service had safe recruitment procedures and new staff went through a comprehensive induction to make sure they had the confidence, skill and knowledge to support people well.

People were referred to other professionals as needed. People had care plans which were personal to them and they were asked to contribute to the plans in ways that suited them.

People were asked to say if they had concerns or complaints through using easy to read surveys and had been helped to complete these. People’s families were asked to say what they thought of the service through a survey and through talking with the manager and staff.

People were supported in a safe, clean and spacious environment where the manager carried out regular health and safety checks. Since our last inspection a new deputy manager had been appointed which ensured that managers were available. The premises had also been refurbished to a clean and modern standard.

Inspection carried out on 14 and 16 September 2015

During a routine inspection

This unannounced inspection took place on 14 and 16 September 2015.

Sunnyside is a seven bed service providing support and accommodation to people with a learning disability. At the time of the inspection five people were living there. It is a large house in a residential area close to public transport and other services. The house has special adaptations to the bath and shower rooms. There is a lift and the service is accessible for people with physical disabilities or mobility problems. People live in a clean environment that is suitable for their needs.

There was a registered manager in post. However, the registered manager had not been at the service since early June 2015. An experienced manager from another of the provider’s services was managing the service in the interim. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

In August 2015 there was a serious incident at Sunnyside and a person sustained life threatening injuries. The circumstances of the incident are under investigation so we cannot refer further to it in this report.

There had been concerns about the quality of the service and the provider was taking action to address these. People told us that their concerns had been listened to. They added that they had seen improvements since the interim manager had been at the service. They had confidence in him and felt that there would be further improvements under his leadership.

Not all aspects of the service provided were safe. In August 2015 the fire service carried out a fire safety visit and issued the provider with an enforcement notice due to the seriousness of their concerns. The provider was addressing the issues identified. For example, smoke detectors had been replaced and staff had received additional fire safety training.

Systems were not in place to adequately minimise risk and to ensure that people were supported as safely as possible.

Staff were attentive and supportive. They engaged with people and chatted with them throughout the day. People were supported by kind, caring staff who treated them with respect.

People received their prescribed medicines safely.

People’s care plans contained a lot of information about their needs and preferences. These were being reviewed and updated to ensure that staff had current and sufficient details to enable them to provide a responsive service that fully met people’s needs.

Systems were in place to support staff to gain the necessary skills and knowledge to meet peoples assessed needs, preferences and choices but staff training was not always up to date.

People were supported to make choices about what they did and what happened to them. They took part in activities of their choice in the community and in the service but these were limited and repetitive and needed to be developed further.

People’s healthcare needs were monitored and addressed to ensure that they remained as healthy as possible.

Staff had received Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) training. Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards is where a person can be deprived of their liberties where it is deemed to be in their best interests or for their own safety. Staff were aware that on occasions this was necessary. We saw that this was thought to be necessary for some people living at the service to keep them safe.

People were supported to eat and drink enough to meet their needs. They told us that they liked the food.

Although people spoke positively about the improvements that had been made by the interim manager social care professionals were concerned that there was not a full time manager in post to oversee the service.

The provider’s recruitment process ensured that staff were suitable to work with people who need support.

People were happy to talk to the interim manager and to raise any concerns they had. They had confidence that he would deal with any issues.

The provider and the management team monitored the quality of service provided to ensure that people received a safe and effective service that met their needs. When shortfalls had been identified action had been taken to address these.

The environment was suitable for the people who used the service but needed redecoration to make it more homely and welcoming.

At the time of the visit staffing levels were sufficient to meet people’s needs.

We found one breach of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.

Inspection carried out on 27 September 2013

During a routine inspection

As part of our inspection we spoke with five out of six people using the service, one relative and three members of staff working in the home on the day of our visit. One person who used the service told us, "I like it here. I like everything." Another person told us, "I like living here and staff treat me well."

There were systems in place in place for obtaining, and acting in accordance with, the consent of people who use the service in relation to the care and treatment provided to them. Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

Care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure people's safety and welfare. We found people's needs were being met. Staff supported people to be as independent as possible and to use community facilities. One person told us "I get to go out a lot with staff and my family."

People were protected against the risks associated with medicines because the provider had appropriate arrangements in place to manage medicines. There were enough qualified, skilled and experienced staff to meet people�s needs. There was an effective complaints system available. Comments and complaints people made were responded to appropriately.

Inspection carried out on 27 February 2013

During a routine inspection

People were treated with respect and their care, health and welfare needs were met. A person who uses the service said "they treat me right. If they did not I would say treat me with respect but they do. They help me if I am not well.� A healthcare professional told us staff were very proactive with regards to people�s healthcare needs. People were supported to be as independent as possible and to use community facilities. One person told us �I go to church and to the cinema.�

Staff received the training and support they needed to carry out their duties and support people who used the service. One member of staff said �we have a lot of training and its mainly e-learning now. I have monthly supervision and get good support from the manager.�

The manager and the provider monitored the quality of the service to ensure that people received a safe service that met their needs. A relative told us �the manager does spot checks. A member of staff said �oh yes the manager does do checks at night.� Records showed that the provider carried out monthly monitoring visits and also that there had been a recent health safety audit.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)