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Inspection carried out on 27 June 2017

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 27 June 2017 and was unannounced. At the last inspection in March 2015 we found the service was rated ‘Good’ in all key questions and overall.

Wimbledon Beaumont DCA provides home care to people living in assisted living apartments. The apartments are based within the grounds of Wimbledon Beaumont, a nursing home run by the same provider. People living in the assisted living apartments live independently but can choose to purchase a care package from the provider, to assist them with their personal care and support if this is needed. This could range from one visit in the morning to a number of calls during the day. People who used this service had a range needs. At the time of the inspection, four people were using the service to provide them with personal care.

The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have a legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At this inspection we found the service continued to be Good.

People were supported by staff who received training in safeguarding people from abuse. The provider had robust procedures to recruit only staff who were suitable to work with people, although there had been no new staff recruited since our last inspection. Staff managed people’s medicines safely. The provider managed risks to people well.

Staff received training, supervision and annual appraisal to support them to understand and meet people’s needs. Staff understood their responsibilities under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 to help ensure people’s rights were protected. People received food and drink according to their preferences and dietary requirements.

People were supported by staff who were kind and caring and treated them with dignity and respect. People were involved in their care and staff knew people’s needs and preferences well. Staff supported people to maintain their independence.

A range of activities were available to people according to their interests. The provider ensured information in people’s care plans was accurate as they were regularly reviewed. This meant they were reliable to staff to follow when caring for people. The provider involved people in their care reviews. A suitable complaints process was in place and people were confident any complaints they made would be investigated properly.

The service was well led and the registered manager and staff understood their roles and responsibilities. The provider encouraged open communication with people and staff. A range of suitable audits were in place to assess and monitor the quality of service delivery.

Further information is in the detailed findings section of the report.

Inspection carried out on 03/3/2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 3 March 2015 and was unannounced. At the last inspection of the service on 17 December 2013 we found the service was meeting the regulations we looked at.

Wimbledon Beaumont DCA provides home care to people living in assisted living apartments. The apartments are based within the grounds of Wimbledon Beaumont, a nursing home run by the same provider. People living in the assisted living apartments live independently but can choose to purchase a care package from the provider, to assist them with their personal care and support if this is needed. This could range from one visit in the morning to a number of calls during the day. People who use this service have a wide range of health care or medical needs. At the time of the inspection, nine people were using the service to provide them with home care.

The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have a legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe in their apartments. Staff knew what action to take to ensure people were protected if they suspected they were at risk of abuse or harm. Where any risks to people’s health, safety and welfare had been identified, there were appropriate plans in place to ensure these were minimised to keep people safe from harm or injury in the home.

There were enough staff to meet the needs of people using the service. The provider ensured appropriate checks were made to ensure they were suitable to care for and support people using the service. They received appropriate training and support to meet people’s needs. The registered manager and provider monitored training to ensure staff skills and knowledge were kept up to date. Staff were well supported by the registered manager and other senior staff and were enabled to discuss any issues or concerns they had. They demonstrated a good understanding and awareness of people’s needs and how these should be met.

People received their medicines as prescribed and these were stored safely in their homes. Staff monitored people’s general health and wellbeing on regular basis. Where they had any issues or concerns about an individual’s health, staff ensured they received prompt care and attention from appropriate healthcare professionals such as the GP.

Senior staff were aware of their responsibilities in relation to obtaining people's consent to care and support and ensured people had capacity to make decisions about specific aspects of this. Care plans were in place which were personalised and reflective of people’s individual choices and preferences for how they received care. People were involved in making decisions about their care needs and support needs and able to retain control and independence in how this was provided.

People told us staff were kind and caring. We observed kind and caring interactions between people and staff during our inspection. Staff showed genuine interest and concern in how people were and how they [staff] could assist them.

People said staff ensured their privacy and dignity was respected and maintained. People were encouraged and supported to develop and maintain relationships. People said they were comfortable raising any issues or concerns they had directly with staff and knew how to make a complaint if needed. People were confident that any complaints they made would be dealt with appropriately.

People’s views were sought in developing and improving the service. The provider was committed to improving the quality of care people experienced. This was embedded in the vision and values for the service. There was a well-established quality assurance programme which checked care was being provided to an acceptable standard. Where improvements were needed, the registered manager took action to ensure these were made. They encouraged an open and inclusive environment within the home which enabled people, their relatives and staff to speak honestly about their experiences.

Inspection carried out on 17 December 2013

During a routine inspection

On the day of our inspection there were seventeen people living in the assisted living apartments at Wimbledon Beaumont. The service was not required to be registered with us for the accommodation because people were living in their own apartments. They were however registered to deliver personal care to people and this is the area we looked at during our inspection

Seven people living in the assisted living apartments had purchased a personal care and support package from the service.

We were able to speak with one of the people using the service. They spoke positively about their experiences of the service. They described staff that cared for them as ‘amazing’ and ‘patient’. They told us senior staff were approachable and they felt confident they would resolve any issues if these arose. People were provided with information about how to make a complaint if they were not happy with the service.

We saw evidence staff were given clear instructions and guidance on how to obtain people’s consent before carrying out any care or support. The person we spoke with confirmed staff asked for their permission before carrying out any care or support. Where people were unable to make decisions about their care, we saw family members were closely involved in developing and agreeing people’s care and support plans.

We looked at people’s records and saw current plans were in place to meet people’s care and support needs. Risks to people’s health, safety and welfare had been identified and plans were in place to manage these to keep people safe. People’s care plans and risk assessments had been reviewed and updated regularly so that staff had up to date information about people’s current care and support needs. Records kept by the provider were kept securely and appropriately maintained.

There were effective procedures in place to recruit and appoint staff and appropriate checks were made about their suitability to work for the service. The competency of new staff was assessed to ensure they had the appropriate skills and knowledge to care for and support people using the service. All staff were given appropriate training, guidance and equipment in order to maintain good personal hygiene and prevent the risks of cross infection when carrying out care and support. The person we spoke with said about staff “They keep everything very clean and tidy.”

Inspection carried out on 23 October 2012

During a routine inspection

We spoke with 2 people using the service who told us staff were nice. They told us if they had any issues or complaints they would raise these and speak to staff straight away. One person said the manager was always available to speak with and willing to listen. Another person told us they had no complaints. We saw that people using the service were treated with care and respect by staff. We looked at people’s individual care plans and saw people using the service had been involved in developing and reviewing these on a regular basis with staff to identify any changes that were needed. We noted that staff looking after people using the service were encouraged to refresh their skills and knowledge and met regularly with their managers to discuss workplace issues or concerns. We found that senior staff regularly reviewed the quality of service provided and asked for the views of people using the service. We saw changes and improvements had been made where these were needed.