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Inspection carried out on 6 October 2017

During a routine inspection

St Anns’ in Kettering accommodates and provides care for up to 39 older people, most of whom have dementia care needs. There were 31 people in the home when we inspected, with three other people in hospital.

At the last inspection on 30 July 2015, the service was rated ‘Good’. At this inspection we found the service remained ‘Good’.

A registered manager was in post although we were informed they would be submitting an application to voluntarily cancel their registration. The provider was recruiting a new manager and the successful candidate will apply to register. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social care Act 2008 and associated regulations about how the service is run.

People were safe. There were sufficient numbers of experienced and trained staff to safely meet people’s assessed needs. There were appropriate recruitment procedures in place to protect people from receiving care from staff that were unsuited to the job.

People’s needs had been assessed prior to admission and they each had an agreed care plan that was regularly reviewed to ensure they continued to receive the care and support they needed. People were safeguarded from abuse and poor practice by staff that knew what action they needed to take if they suspected this was happening. Risks to people’s safety were reviewed as their needs and dependencies changed.

People were treated equally and shown respect as individuals with a range of needs that came together from diverse backgrounds. They received care and support from staff that knew what was expected of them and they carried out their duties effectively and with compassion. Care plans were personalised and reflected each person’s individual needs and provided staff with the information and guidance they needed to manage risk and keep people safe.

People’s capacity to make informed choices had been assessed and the provider and staff were aware of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the importance of seeking people’s consent when receiving care and support. People were encouraged and enabled to do things for themselves by friendly staff that were responsive and attentive. Their individual preferences for the way they liked to receive their care and support were respected. Staff had insight into people’s capabilities and aspirations.

There were appropriate arrangements in place for people to have regular healthcare check-ups. People had access to community healthcare professionals and received timely medical attention when this was needed.

People who needed encouragement and support with eating a healthy diet received the help they required. They had enough to eat and drink.

Medicines were appropriately and safely managed and staff had received the training they needed in the safe administration of medicines. Medicines were securely stored and there were suitable arrangements in place for their timely administration.

People, and where appropriate, their family or other representatives were assured that if they were unhappy with the care provided they would be listened to and that appropriate action would be taken to resolve matters.

Inspection carried out on 30 July 2015

During a routine inspection

This unannounced inspection took place on the 30 July 2015.

St Anns accommodates and provides care for up to 39 older people, most of whom have dementia care needs.

A registered manager was in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social care Act 2008 and associated regulations about how the service is run.

People received care from a team of care staff that understood their role and knew what was expected of them when caring for older people with dementia care needs. People were cared for by sufficient numbers of care staff that were experienced and had received the training they needed to do their job. Recruitment procedures were robust and protected people from receiving unsafe care from care staff unsuited to the job.

People’s care needs had been assessed prior to admission and they each had an appropriate care plan. Their care plans were regularly reviewed and were individualised to reflect their current needs so that care staff had the necessary up-to-date information and guidance to meet these needs. People benefited from receiving care from staff that listened to and acted upon what they said, including the views of their relatives, friends, or significant others.

People were safeguarded from abuse and poor practice by care staff that had the training, guidance and insight they needed to recognise this and take timely action to protect them.

People were enabled to do things for themselves by friendly care staff that were attentive to each person’s individual needs and understood their capabilities. People’s individual preferences for the way they liked to receive their care and support were respected.

People’s healthcare needs were met and they received timely treatment from other community based healthcare professionals when this was necessary. People’s medicines were appropriately and safely managed. Medicines were securely stored and there were suitable arrangements in place for their timely administration.

People who needed support with eating and drinking received the help they required. People’s individual nutritional needs were assessed, monitored and met with appropriate guidance from healthcare professionals that was acted upon. People had enough to eat and drink.

People, and where appropriate, their representatives or significant others were assured that if they were dissatisfied with the quality of the service they would be listened to and that appropriate remedial action would be taken to try to resolve matters to their satisfaction.

People received care from care staff that were supported and encouraged by the provider and the registered manager to do a good job caring for older people. The quality of the service provided was regularly audited by the registered manager and the provider and improvements made when necessary.

Inspection carried out on 9 October 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with six people who used the service and with two relatives of people who used the service. One person living in the home told us "the place is nice and clean. I�m well cared for and the food is okay. Another told us �staff are respectful and help me with personal care�. A relative told us they felt involved in their relative�s care and were kept informed of any issues and invited to review of care meetings. They added �the carers are lovely�.

We found that staff supported people appropriately and spoke to them in a friendly and respectful manner. Staff spent time with people talking with them and encouraging them to be involved in activities. Staff were kind and patient with people who were living with dementia and who were not able to express their needs.

Staff were trained and supported and delivered care which met people's needs. Staff understood people's needs and preferences and respected their choices.

The provider had systems in place to monitor the quality of the service and to find out the views of people who used the service and their representatives.

Inspection carried out on 15 February 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with four people who used the service and with two relatives of people who used the service. All the people we spoke with gave positive feedback. One person living in the home told us "It's very good. The staff are very kind and understanding. They help me when I need it, I'm comfortable here". Another person told us "I'm happy with how I'm being looked after". One person told us that their mother was "well cared for, and that the carers are very good". They said that the meals were okay and that they and other members of their family felt involved in their relative's care and that it was much better than a previous care home.

We found that staff supported people appropriately and spoke to them in a friendly and respectful manner. Staff spent time with people talking with them and encouraging them to be involved in activities. Staff were kind and patient with people who were living with dementia and who were not able to express their needs. Staff were trained and supported and delivered care which met people's needs. Staff understood people's needs and preferences and respected their choices.

Inspection carried out on 28 July 2011

During a routine inspection

People who were able to comment on their care told us they were happy and liked living at St Anns. They said the staff are friendly, helpful, and treat them kindly.

Comments included, for example;

� �I have a lovely room. They keep it so clean.�

� �The food is really good here.�

� �Whenever I visit I am made very welcome.�

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)