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Community Supported Living Limited Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 12 March 2019

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 12 and 18 March 2019. We gave notice of the inspection to the registered manager to ensure they would be available.

Community Supported Living is a community based organisation that supports people, predominantly people who have mental health needs, to live in their own homes. At the time of our inspection, Community Supported Living supported 69 people who lived on the Wirral and employed 39 staff.

Not everyone using the service received the regulated activity ‘personal care’. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) only inspects the service being received by people provided with personal care such as help with tasks relating to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do, we also take into account any wider social care provided.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At our last inspection on 3 and 16 June 2016 we rated the service good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

The support people received was reliable and was delivered at a time agreed with them. People’s support plans were person-centred and focused on their individual support needs and managing risks to their health and wellbeing. This meant that people who had a history of frequent hospital admissions were able to live in the community without being admitted to hospital.

The service was fully staffed with trained and experienced support workers. Staff told us they were well supported and were happy in their roles. New staff were recruited safely and received a comprehensive induction, training and support programme. Established staff received regular supervision, appraisal, and training refreshers.

People told us they were happy with the support they received and that all of the staff were caring and respectful.

The manager and other senior staff worked alongside the support workers and people knew them by name and found them approachable. The manager had systems in place to monitor the quality of the service and to consult with people about the service they received.

Inspection carried out on 3 June 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 3 and 16 June 2016 and was unannounced.

Community Supported Living is a community based organisation, supporting people who have mental health support needs to live in their own homes. All people held their own tenancy to their own home. Some people had a tenancy on an apartment within a block where there was support from staff during the day and night. Other people lived more independently and received times of support during the day. At the time of our inspection Community Supported Living supported 56 people who lived in Wirral.

All the people we spoke with told us they were happy with the support they received. People told us because of good support they had experienced improvements in their wellbeing. People told us about positive outcomes they had achieved and changes they had been supported to make in their lives. One person told us, “I’ve gained my independence back”.

The support people received was reliable and was delivered at a time agreed with them. People’s support plans were person centred and focused on their individual support needs, aspirations and goals. The support plans had been written with the person and anyone else the person had wanted to be involved. When completed the support plan was signed off by the person.

There was evidence that people’s support plans had been regularly reviewed and updated. They provided clear guidance for support staff and enabled people to direct their care and support. People had been supported to go to college, explore hobbies and interests and develop their relationships with people. Some people told us they were supported to maintain their homes. Other people had been focused on living in their community and maintaining their tenancy. People who had experienced a history of being repeatedly admitted to hospital had been able to live in their community for many years with support without being admitted into hospital.

The service was fully staffed with trained and experienced support workers. Staff told us they were well supported and were happy in their roles. New support staff were recruited based upon their values and life and relationship skills. They received an in-depth and comprehensive induction, training and support programme. Established staff received regular supervision meetings, staff meetings, appraisals and knowledge and training refreshers.

People told us they felt safe. Staff were trained and were knowledgeable in safeguarding vulnerable adults. People’s care files contained appropriate risk assessments which guided staff on any immediate responses that may be necessary and an ongoing strategy to mitigate any risks to a person. There was a system in place for documenting any accidents, incidents or near misses that happened. These were reviewed by community based team leaders and centrally by the manager for any future learning and to ensure appropriate responses had been made. Staff had access to a 24hour senior member of staff through an on-call system for advice and support.

People told us the support they received was caring. One person told us, “The staff care about me”. People we spoke with described in detail and gave examples of how a positive and caring relationship with their support worker helped them. People were respected in their choices, decisions and in their independence. The organisations style of communication with people and the wording and approach of people’s care plans demonstrated a caring and respectful approach in everyday practice.

The service supported people within the principles of the Mental Capacity Act (2005). Staff received training on the Mental Capacity Act and were knowledgeable with regard to how this impacts the support people receive. People were listened to and their consent was sought in the planning and providing of their support. If people needed to make a major decision people were supported to access an independent advocate.

The manager had a strong set of value

Inspection carried out on 31 January 2014

During a routine inspection

During our inspection, we observed signed care plans and risk assessments which showed people had been involved in, and consented to, the proposed care and support within their plans. We were told by staff members that `services users are always involved in decisions about what they want to do or where they want to go.` People�s care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that protected them from any unlawful discrimination. Additionally, there were arrangements in place to deal with foreseeable emergencies. All medication was monitored and handled appropriately and were kept safely in individual rooms in locked coded cabinets.

We were told, and the staffing rota confirmed, there were always sufficient numbers of staff with the right qualifications, skills and experience which met the needs of all people using services at all times. There was an effective complaints system available which ensured any comments and complaints people made were responded to appropriately. People�s complaints were fully investigated and resolved, where possible, to their satisfaction.