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Inspection carried out on 16 March 2020

During a routine inspection

Sweyne Court is registered to provide accommodation and personal care without nursing for up to 43 older people, some of whom may be living with dementia. The service has two floors and there is access to these via a staircase and lift. On the day of our inspection the service was caring for 40 people.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People felt safe living in the service and had their belongings and finances protected. People’s relatives felt that the service was secure. There were processes in place to ensure that staff knew how to protect people from abuse and where to escalate concerns if they needed to which staff were aware of. People had their health and wellbeing assessed and risk assessments were individual to each person and based on their needs. Robust recruitment checks were in place for employing new members of staff. Medicines were managed safely.

Staff received training and development to be able to support people safely which included learning more about specific conditions related to the needs of the people who used the service such as dementia. People were supported to maintain their health and wellbeing in line with recommended guidance. People were supported to maintain a balanced diet and were given choices about what they ate and drank. Guidance about specialist diets from healthcare professionals was followed.

Staff were kind and caring when they supported people and gave emotional support when needed. People were comfortable with staff and had a good rapport with them. People and their relatives were involved in making decisions about their care and care was planned based on people’s preferences. People had their privacy and dignity protected. People’s relatives felt welcome at the service.

Staff knew people well and were able to communicate with people individually based on their abilities. People were supported to express their views and raise concerns. People and their families were supported when they were nearing the end of their lives.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People, their relatives and staff found the registered manager to be approachable. People and their relatives were involved in the service and asked for feedback for improvements. There were systems in place which supported monitoring the quality of the service provided to drive improvement such as by working with other healthcare professionals and local schemes to ensure best practice guidance was followed. The registered manager was actively involved in initiatives to improve the quality of care that people received and the service had been recognised at a national awards ceremony for being the dementia team of the year in 2019.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was Good (published 22 September 2017).

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 30 August 2017

During a routine inspection

The Inspection took place on 30 August 2017 and 7 September 2017 and it was unannounced.

Sweyne Court is registered to provide accommodation and personal care without nursing for up to 43 older people, some of whom may be living with dementia. There were 40 people living in the service at the time of the inspection.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the last inspection in June 2016, we asked the provider to take action to make improvements to risks to people’s health and safety, their responsibilities under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and their quality assurance processes. The provider sent us an action plan and the actions have now been completed.

At this inspection, we found that people received safe care and support. Risks to people’s health and safety were fully assessed and had management plans in place to minimise any risks. People’s capacity to make decisions had been assessed and the outcomes were recorded. The registered manager and staff had been trained in the MCA and demonstrated a good knowledge and understanding of the Act and of how to protect people. Staff knew how to protect people from the risk of harm. They had received training and described how they kept people safe. There were sufficient staff who had been safely recruited, were well trained and supervised by the registered manager and senior staff.

People received their medication as prescribed. Medication management was good. There were clear systems in place for ordering, receiving and disposing of medication. People received their medication from trained staff whose competency to administer medication was regularly checked.

People are supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff support them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service support this practice. People told us they had a choice of food and drink that provided them with a healthy balanced diet. Staff were kind, caring and compassionate and they knew the people they cared for well. They respected people and ensured that their privacy and dignity was always maintained. People expressed their views and opinions and were supported to follow their individual hobbies and interests. People had access to a range of healthcare services and their healthcare needs were met. Advocacy contact details were available if needed.

People’s care needs had been fully assessed and the care plans and risk assessments ensured that people were cared for in a way they preferred. The care plans provided staff with the information that they needed to meet people’s needs and preferences and to care for them safely. People were confident that their concerns or complaints were listened to and acted on. There was an effective system in place to assess and monitor the quality of the service and to drive improvements.

Inspection carried out on 7 June 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 7and 8 June 2016.

Sweyne Court is registered to provide accommodation with personal care to up to 43 older people, many of whom may be living with dementia related needs. There were 37 people receiving a service on the day of our inspection.

The manager had been appointed since our last inspection and had made an application to be registered with the commission as required. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Systems to manage risk and medicines needed improvement to ensure people’s safety and wellbeing was maintained.

Up to date guidance about protecting people’s rights had not been followed so as to support decisions made on people’s behalf and comply with legislation.

The provider's systems to check on the quality and safety of the service provided were not effective and had not identified the issues we found.

Staff were knowledgeable about identifying abuse and how to report it to safeguard people. Recruitment procedures were thorough.

People were supported by skilled staff who knew them well and were available in sufficient numbers to meet people's needs effectively. People had choices of food and drinks that supported their nutritional or health care needs and their personal preferences. Arrangements were in place to support people to gain access to health professionals and services.

People’s dignity and privacy was respected and staff were friendly and caring. Visitors were welcomed and relationships were supported.

People’s care was planned and reviewed with them or the person acting on their behalf. Staff knew people well and how to meet their needs and preferences. People were supported to participate in social activities that interested them and met their needs.

People felt able to raise any complaints and felt that the provider would listen to them. Information to help them to make a complaint was readily available.

People knew the manager and found them to be approachable and available in the home. People living and working in the service had the opportunity to say how they felt about the home and the service it provided and be listened to.

Inspection carried out on 11 March 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 11 March 2015.

Sweyne Court provides personal care and accommodation for up to 43 older people who may be living with dementia. There were 33 people living in the service on the day of our inspection.

There was a manager in post who was in the process of registering with CQC. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were safeguarded from the risk of harm and abuse. The staff and manager knew about safeguarding procedures and had applied them appropriately. Staff had managed risks to people’s health and safety well. People received their medication as prescribed. There were safe systems in place for receiving, administering and disposing of medicines.

The service had good recruitment practices and employed enough staff to meet people’s assessed needs. Staff demonstrated the knowledge and skills needed to carry out their work. They received an induction and ongoing training and support.

The manager had a good knowledge of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS.) DoLS are a code of practice to supplement the main Mental Capacity Act 2005. These safeguards protect the rights of adults by ensuring that if there are restrictions on their freedom and liberty these are assessed by appropriately trained professionals.

People were supported to have sufficient amounts of food and drink to meet their needs. Risks to their health and safety had been assessed and the service had made plans for how they were to be managed.

People’s care needs had been fully assessed and planned for. The care plans provided staff with sufficient information about how to meet people’s individual and diverse needs and preferences and how to care for them safely. The service monitored people’s healthcare needs and sought advice and guidance from healthcare professionals when needed. Staff were caring, they treated people with dignity and respect and offered them choice and control over their lives.

People knew how to make a complaint and were comfortable in doing so. Complaints had been dealt with appropriately.

There were effective systems in place to monitor the quality of the service. The manager had sought the views of all of the relevant people and they had analysed the information that they received and made improvements as a result of the feedback.

Inspection carried out on 30 May 2013

During a routine inspection

People told us that they felt comfortable living in Sweyne Court. One person said; �I am quite content and have everything I need.� People also told us that staff treated them kindly. Many people at Sweyne Court were living with varying levels of dementia and were unable to tell us their views about the service. We saw however that they were comfortable and that staff interacted well with them. Staff spoken with had a good understanding of peoples' individual needs. People were treated respectfully and their individuality understood.

We found that people's needs were assessed and planned for to ensure that their individual needs would be met. People had opportunities through activities for stimulation and occupation.

We found that the service managed peoples' medicines well and safely.

People told us that the staff who worked at the service were good. One person said, "The staff are all lovely." We found that staff were supported through induction, training and supervision to have the skills and knowledge needed to carry out their role effectively.

Although some relatives have issues with the service which the provider was trying to address, most people told us that they were happy with the quality of the service provided. We found that the provider had robust processes in place to monitor the quality and safety of the service.

Inspection carried out on 21 June 2012

During a routine inspection

Most of the people we spoke with told us that they were satisfied with the care and support provided at the service and most said that the staff were helpful and considerate towards their needs. People told us that they were satisfied with the food provided and the daily menu choices. They said that their rooms were comfortable and that staff kept rooms clean and tidy.

One person told us that the staff were very good and they could not ask for more with regard to their support needs being met by the staff. Another told us that the staff were friendly and that they had no complaints about the home.

Inspection carried out on 4 August 2011

During a routine inspection

People with whom we spoke told us that the staff were hard working and caring, but often busy and at times short staffed. They said that they were happy with the care provided and liked the home and that staff were kind and polite.

They told us that they do not go out unless their relatives can take them. Whilst staff interactions with people were satisfactory, there can be long periods of no interaction, stimulation or activities.

The recent people�s survey highlighted that relatives were satisfied with the care provided. People with whom we spoke told us that the home is clean and they like their bedrooms.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)