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Inspection carried out on 11 November 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Mount Vernon Terrace is registered to provide personal care for up to 16 people with mental health conditions. At the time of the inspection 11 people were living at the service. The building is a large terraced property and accommodation is provided over 4 floors, accessed by stairs. Communal lounges and a dining room were provided on the ground floor.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People told us they felt safe and they liked the staff. People were happy with the support they received from staff. They told us if they had any worries or concerns they could speak to the manager and staff and they would be listened to.

People’s care records contained guidance for staff about how to provide support to people safely and to minimise risks to people. Staff were trained in their responsibilities for safeguarding adults and knew what action to take if they witnessed or suspected any abuse.

Systems were in place to make sure people received their medicines as prescribed. Staff supported people to maintain their health by making appropriate referrals to community health professionals and acting on any advice they were given.

There were enough staff provided to meet people’s needs. We observed staff respond to people in a timely manner throughout the day.

The provider had recruitment procedures in place to make sure staff had the required skills and were of suitable character and background.

Staff were provided with regular training, supervisions and appraisals, which supported them to conduct their roles effectively.

The provider had refurbished the basement area and created a recreation resource for people to enjoy. Some bedrooms had been refurbished but some other areas of the building appeared worn and were in need of redecoration. The provider was aware some areas required improvement.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were happy with the food provided. Choices were available, and staff were aware of people’s dietary requirements and preferences.

The provider had a complaints procedure in place. Information about how to complain was provided to people. People living at the service said they could talk to the manager if they had a complaint.

The manager understood the regulatory requirements and monitored the quality and safety of the service on a regular basis. Staff told us they enjoyed their jobs and they worked well together.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection: The last rating for this service was Good (published 4 May 2017).

Why we inspected: This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up: We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 7 March 2017

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 7 March 2017.

Mount Vernon is registered to accommodate up to 16 people and specialises in providing care and support for people who live with a mental health condition. At the time of the inspection there were 15 people using the service.

On the day of our inspection there was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the previous inspection on 26 May 2016 we asked the provider to take action to improve the way the prevention and control of the spread of infection was managed at the service. At this inspection we found improvements had been made in this area and concerns dealt with appropriately.

People’s medicines were not always managed safely. Records showed one person had not received their medicine as prescribed. A weekly medicine audit did not identify this concern. Three members of staff had not completed medicine refresher training.

People were safe living at the service because staff knew how to recognise and report any incidents of harm. Staff were confident that the registered manager would deal with any concerns that they reported. Systems were in place for staff to identify and manage risks and respond to accidents and incidents. Staffing levels were adequate to meet people’s needs. Staff were recruited through safe recruitment practices.

Staff had opportunity to meet with the registered manager to review their work, training and development needs. The registered manager applied the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and Deprivations of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS), so that people’s rights were protected. People received sufficient to eat and drink and they were involved in the planning of their meals however, we saw that their choices were limited on a day to day basis. People’s healthcare needs had been assessed and were regularly monitored. The service worked well with visiting healthcare professionals to ensure they provided effective care and support.

Staff were kind, caring and respectful towards the people they supported. Staff were aware of people's support needs and their personal preferences. Information was available for people about how to access and receive support from an independent advocate. People were encouraged to be independent and make individual choices. People's independence privacy and dignity were promoted and respected by staff.

People received care and support that was personalised and responsive to their individual needs. Regular reviews of people's care and support needs took place. People were supported to participate in a variety of activities. The complaints policy was accessible for everyone.

The registered manager understood the responsibilities of their registration with the CQC. People were involved or had opportunities to be involved in the development of the service. Quality assurance and auditing processes were not always in place to ensure people who used the service, their relatives, staff and visitors were safe. However, the registered manager took action to ensure that these were implemented.

Inspection carried out on 26 May 2016

During a routine inspection

We carried out an unannounced inspection of the service on 26 May 2016. Mount Vernon is registered to accommodate up to 16 people and specialises in providing care and support for people who live with a mental health condition. At the time of the inspection there were 16 people using the service.

On the day of our inspection there was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

There were not sufficient processes in place to reduce the risk of the spread of infection. The risk to people’s safety was reduced because staff understood how to identify the signs of abuse and who to report concerns to. Risk assessments had been completed in areas where people’s safety could be at risk. People had the freedom to live their lives as they wanted to.

Staff were recruited in a safe way, there were enough staff to meet people’s needs and to keep them safe.

Accidents and incidents were investigated. Personal emergency evacuation plans (PEEPs) were not in place, but regular fire drills were carried out. People’s medicines were stored, handled and administered safely although there were not sufficient processes in place for the administration of ‘as needed’ medicines.

People were supported by staff who received an induction and supervision of their work, however some staff required refresher training in particular areas.

The registered manager was aware of the principle of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) and how to apply them if needed. Staff ensured people were given choices about their support needs and day to day life.

People spoke highly of the food and were supported to follow a healthy and balanced diet. People’s day to day health needs were met by the staff and external professionals. Clear guidance on how to support people living with diabetes was needed in people’s care records. Referrals to relevant health services were made where needed.

Staff supported people in a kind and caring way. Staff understood people’s needs and listened to and acted upon their views. Staff responded quickly to people who had become distressed.

People were able to contribute to decisions about their care and support needs. Information about how to contact an independent advocate was available for people. Staff understood how to maintain people’s dignity and people were encouraged to lead as independent a life as they wanted.. People’s friends and relatives were able to visit whenever they wanted to.

People’s care records were person centred and focused on what was important to them. People were involved with reviews of their care with staff and health and social professionals. People were encouraged to socialise with each other and others outside of the home. Staff had identified when people were at risk of social isolation and took positive action to address this. People were provided with the information they needed if they wished to make a complaint.

There was a positive atmosphere at the home. People and staff got on well together and they spoke highly of the registered manager. The registered manager understood their responsibilities and adhered to the terms of their registration with the CQC. People and staff felt able to contribute to the development of the service. People who used the service were encouraged to provide their feedback on how the service could be improved.

There were a number of quality assurance processes in place that regularly assessed the quality and effectiveness of the support provided. However, effective processes were not currently in place to ensure the risk of the spread of infection was reduced.

We identified one breach of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activitie

Inspection carried out on 17 September 2013

During a routine inspection

We carried out the inspection to check that the provider had met the compliance actions that we set at our previous inspection on 25 January 2013 regarding the safety and suitability of the premises and how the service supported staff.

We spoke with one person using the service. They said, �Nothing they [The service] could do better. They�ve [The service] done a lot for me.� They told us they felt safe and would speak to staff if they had any concerns.

They told us they received their medication when they needed it and they were happy with their room. They said, �My room is cosy and warm. It has everything I want in it.� They also said, �Staff treat you ok. They are a decent sort of people.�

We found that people experienced care, treatment and support that met their needs and protected their rights. We found that people were protected from the risk of abuse and medicines were appropriately stored and given. People were protected against the risks of unsafe or unsuitable premises and cared for by staff who were supported to deliver care and treatment safely and to an appropriate standard.

Inspection carried out on 25 January 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with one person using the service. They told us they felt safe and said, �People are treated like a family. People are very, very happy here.� They were happy with the levels of staff at the home.

They also told us they were receiving good care. They said, �Staff are caring, patient and understanding. I�ve never met anyone to equal the staff here.� They told us they would be happy to raise any issues if they needed to.

We found that people�s privacy and dignity were respected and they were involved in decisions about their care. We found that people were supported appropriately but people using the service, visitors and staff were not fully protected against the risk of unsafe premises.

We found that staff were recruited appropriately and there were enough qualified, skilled and experienced staff to meet people�s needs at all times.

We also found that people were cared for by staff who were not fully supported to deliver care and treatment safely and to an appropriate standard. However, we found that appropriate arrangements were in place to assess the quality of service provided.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)