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Archived: Langdale Court Care Home Good

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Reports


Inspection carried out on 7 November 2017

During a routine inspection

We carried out an unannounced inspection of the service on 07 November 2017.

[Langdale Court ] is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. (The care home) accommodates seven people in one adapted building. There were five people with mental health issues receiving care and support at the home at the time of our visit.

The service was last inspected 25 August 2015 and the rating for that inspection was Good.

There was a manager registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The registered manager was not available at the time of the inspection.

People continued to feel safe. Risks were assessed and managed. There was enough staff to meet people’s needs. Safe recruitment was followed to ensure suitable staff were employed.

Medicines were managed and stored safely. Arrangements were in place to make sure the premises were clean. Staff had completed relevant hygiene training. Incidents and accidents were reported and managed.

People continued to have their needs assessed. Staff received training to ensure they had appropriate skills to carry out their roles. People were supported to have sufficient to eat and drink. People were supported to receive care across different services. People were involved in regular monitoring of their health and wellbeing. People were consulted about decisions about their environment. People are supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff support them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service support this practice.

People were positive about the staff and the care they received. People were treated with respect, compassion and in a dignified way at all times by the staff who cared for them. Staff were encouraged to form caring relationships with people to make sure they experienced good care.

People continued to receive personalised care that met their needs. Concerns and complaints were listened and responded to. Discussions took place to support people at their end of life.

Systems and procedures were in place to monitor and improve the quality and safety of the service provided. There was a registered manager in post. Staff were supported to raise concerns and use the whistleblowing policy. Information systems are used effectively to monitor the quality of care.

The service works in partnership with other organisations including the local authority, safeguarding and CQC.

Inspection carried out on 25 August 2015

During a routine inspection

We carried out an unannounced inspection of the service on 25 August 2015.

Langdale Court provides accommodation to younger adults in the Nottingham area. It is registered for a maximum of seven people. There were five people with mental health issues receiving care and support at the home at the time of our visit.

There was a manager registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People felt the service was safe and the provider had arrangements in place to identify the possibility of abuse and to reduce the risk of people experiencing abuse. Risk assessments were in place to help protect people from all potential risks and injuries.

Staff numbers were sufficient and reflected the numbers of staff on the rotas to make sure people were supported appropriately. Staff had undertaken relevant checks to ensure they were safe to work and support people. The provider had a robust recruitment process in place. Medicines were managed appropriately.

The requirements of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) were adhered to. When a person lacked the capacity to make some decisions for themselves, a mental capacity assessment had been completed.

People were encouraged to be independent and received relevant information on how the service was run. People felt that they could express their views about the service that they received.

People received care which met their needs. They were treated with respect and the staff had a caring approach.

People were involved in decisions related to their care and support. Care plans were reviewed, but were not always updated when changes had been found.

People knew how to raise a concern; they knew who they should contact and who to raise the concern with. The provider followed their procedures to ensure complaints or concerns were dealt with.

Systems were in place to monitor the service, but the provider did not always record their findings or actions they had taken.

People were encouraged to express their views and comment on how the service was run.

The management team worked well together and supported people accordingly. The service worked with other professionals and fulfilled their obligations to the care commissioners.

Inspection carried out on 18 June 2013

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

We spoke with three people who used the service and two members of staff. We observed that improvements had been made to the areas we looked at in March 2013.

We looked at four care files and found plans of care for people with complex needs and risk assessments had been put in place.

We found the kitchen area had been refurbished and new equipment had been purchased.

The staff we spoke with demonstrated their understanding in regards to the use of the equipment in relation to infection control.

We found seating had been replaced in the communal lounge. People told us although the chairs were very nice, they were not that comfortable.

Inspection carried out on 7 March 2013

During an inspection in response to concerns

We carried out this inspection because we had received information of concern.

We spoke to four people living in the home, they told us they had everything they needed.

People told us they were happy living at Langdale Court and they had good communication with the provider and staff.

Each person had their own room with space to lock away personal items.

We looked at five care files, although the files were person centred we found gaps in two of the care plans we looked at. There were no appropriate plans in place for people who suffered from complex conditions.

We found areas of concern in the kitchen and other areas of the home in relation to infection control.

Each person we spoke with told us they were happy with their bedrooms and they felt the home was sufficiently maintained. However, we found evidence that did not support this.

People we spoke with said there was sufficient staffing to meet their needs.

Inspection carried out on 11 September 2012

During a routine inspection

Langdale Court is a converted Victorian style three-storey house, owned by Mr B O & Mrs C N Ogbakaeko. The location is registered to provide personal care and accommodation for up to seven persons. The home is situated near Nottingham city centre and is close to shops, pubs, the post office and other amenities. Car parking is street parking and a resident's permit is required from the home.

We spoke to five people who used the service, they said that they liked living at Langdale Court and were happy with the care and support they received. One person said, “I can go out when I want.” Another said, “We get on well with staff.” Other people told us they were comfortable and felt safe.

The registered person told us people were invited to visit the home and sample the environment before they made their decisions to move in permanently. People told us they were given enough information about the home to help them make the appropriate decision to stay. They said they received a copy of the statement of purpose and a service user guide when they first arrived at the home.

All rooms had privacy locks and lockable cabinets for people’s personal items.

Everyone living at the home said the staff were very supportive and they all got on well with each other.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)