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Chatsworth Residential Home Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 21 February 2020

During a routine inspection

About the service

Chatsworth Residential Home provides care and accommodation for up to 26 older people and people living with dementia. At the time of the inspection there were 26 people living in the service. Accommodation is provided over three floors with stair lifts providing access to the first floor and lower ground floor. Communal lounge and dining rooms are situated on the ground floor.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People and relatives praised the home. People told us they felt safe and well cared for. People were supported to make decisions and choices about their care and their preferences were respected.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

Staff were seen to be kind, caring and friendly and it was clear staff knew people. For those people who were unable to share their views with us, we observed them to be comfortable in staff’s company, smiling and making eye contact.

There were sufficient numbers of staff employed to ensure people’s needs were met and recruitment practices were safe. Staff were well-trained and aware of their responsibilities to safeguard people.

Some documentation required minor amendment to ensure it contained information to support people’s independence and to mitigate risks to their health.

People received their medicines safely and as prescribed. Medicine management practices were safe.

The environment was safe and equipment was regularly serviced to ensure it remained in safe working order.

Consideration was given to providing a variety of leisure and social activities for people to enjoy. The home maintained links with the local community by providing trips to local places of interest. People enjoyed regular visits from a local nursery school as well as making monthly visits to a local primary school.

The home was well managed. Quality assurance processes undertaken by the registered manager ensured people received high quality care that met their needs and respected their preferences.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection and update: The last rating for this service was good. (published 18 August 2017

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 19 July 2017

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 19 and 20 July 2017 and was unannounced. Chatsworth Residential Home provides care and accommodation for up to 26 older people some of whom are living with dementia. At the time of the inspection there were 25 people living in the service.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the last inspection, the service was rated Good overall.

At this inspection we found the service remained Good in all areas.

Why the service is rated good.

One person said; “They are helpful and caring. They make me feel safe by understanding me.” Another person said; “They are very very caring” and a relative said; “You would be hard pushed to find a better home in Plymouth” while another said; “I’m 100% happy with dad’s care here.”

People remained safe at Chatsworth Residential Home because they received their medicines safely. People, relatives and staff told us there were sufficient staff to meet people’s needs. Risk assessments had been completed to help people to retain as much independence as possible and receive care with minimum risk to themselves or others.

People continued to receive care from staff who had the skills and knowledge required to effectively support them. Staff had regular training and were competent. People were supported to have as much choice and control of their lives as possible. Staff supported people in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. People's healthcare needs were monitored by the staff and people had access to healthcare professionals according to their individual needs.

People said the staff were kind and very caring. One relative said; “Dad’s care is second to none!” There was a calm atmosphere in the service with staff supporting people with their care needs discreetly. People's privacy was respected. People where possible, or their representatives, were involved in decisions about the care and support people received.

The service remained responsive to people's individual needs. Care and support was personalised to each individuals which helped ensure people were able to make choices about their day to day lives. Complaints were fully investigated and responded to. A relative said; “Never needed to make a complaint but I know they would listen and sort it.”

People were assisted to take part in a wide range of activities according to their individual interests. Entertainers visited the service and trips out were also planned for people.

The service continued to be well led. People, relatives and staff told us the registered manager was always very approachable. The registered manager and provider sought people's views to make sure people were at the heart of any changes within the home. The registered manager and provider had monitoring systems which enabled them to identify good practices and areas of improvement.

Inspection carried out on 24 & 25 February 2015

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 24 and 25 February and was unannounced. Chatsworth Residential Home provides care and accommodation for up to 26 older people some whom are living with dementia or have a physical disability. On the day of the inspection 25 people resided at the service with one person currently in hospital.

The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

During our inspection we observed people looked relaxed with the staff and there was a friendly and calm atmosphere. People and staff chatted and enjoyed each other’s company. Comments included; “I wouldn’t be anywhere else!” People, who were able to, told us they were happy living there.

People had their privacy and dignity maintained. We observed staff supporting people and being kind and compassionate. People told us staff were kind and caring. People’s privacy and dignity were respected by staff who provided individual and personalised care.

People and their relatives were happy with the care they received from staff and said they were knowledgeable and able to meet their needs. People were encouraged and supported to make decisions and choices whenever possible in their day to day lives.

People were protected by safe recruitment procedures. There were sufficient staff employed to meet people’s needs and new staff completed an induction programme. Staff had undertaken appropriate training and had the right skills to meet people’s needs.

People had access to healthcare professionals, for example GP’s and district nurses, to ensure they received appropriate care and treatment to meet their health care needs. Staff responded to information given to them by professionals to ensure people received the care they needed to remain well.

People who did not have capacity to make decisions for themselves were supported by staff to make sure their legal rights were protected and worked with others in their best interest. People’s safety and liberty were promoted.

People’s medicines were managed safely. Medicines were managed, stored, given to people as prescribed and disposed of safely. Staff received appropriate training and understood the importance of safe administration and management of medicines.

People were better protected from harm as staff had safeguarding of vulnerable adults training and had the knowledge on how to report any concerns and what action they would take to protect people. Staff were confident any incidents or allegations would be fully investigated.

Staff received a comprehensive induction programme. Staff had completed appropriate training and had the right skills and knowledge to meet people’s needs.

People were supported to maintain a healthy balanced diet. People told us they enjoyed their meals and did not feel rushed. People had opportunities to take part in a variety of activities.

People’s care records contained detailed information about how people wished to be supported. Records were regularly updated to reflect people’s changing needs. People and their families were involved in the planning of their care.

Staff said they were happy working at the service and told us the manager was supportive, kept them informed, listened to them and acted on any concerns raised.

There were quality assurance systems in place. Feedback to assess the quality of the service provided was sought from people and their relatives. Audits were carried out to help ensure people were safe, for example environmental audits were completed.

Inspection carried out on 3 August 2013

During a routine inspection

We met or spoke to most of the 25 people who used services, spoke to four relatives, talked with the staff on duty and checked the provider's records. One person using the service said, �You get everything you want here�.

We saw people�s privacy and dignity being respected at all times. We saw and heard staff speak to people in a way that demonstrated a good understanding by staff of people�s choices and preferences. One person said, �I like to get up early and they never mind�.

Staff we spoke with were clear about the actions they would take should they have any concerns about people's welfare.

We looked at care records for three people. We spoke to staff about the care given, looked at records relating to them, met with them and observed staff working with them.

We saw that people's care records described their needs and how those needs were met. This meant that people�s care and welfare needs were being met.

During our visit to the home we saw sufficient staff on duty to meet the needs of people living in the home. We spoke with most of the staff working during our visit and all agreed that the home had sufficient staff.

We saw that Chatsworth Residential Home held all records securely to protect people�s confidentiality.

Inspection carried out on 26 November 2012

During a routine inspection

We met people who used services, talked with relatives, staff and checked the provider's records. We used a number of different methods to help us understand the experiences of people using the service, because the people using the service had complex needs which meant they were not all able to tell us their experiences.

We saw people�s privacy and dignity being respected at all times. We saw and heard staff speak to people in a way that demonstrated a good understanding by staff of people�s choices and preferences. People said, �The staff are excellent, always friendly� and a relative said, �Mum is happy as Larry�.

Staff were clear about the actions they would take should they have any concerns about people's safety.

We pathway tracked four people who use the service. Pathway tracking means we looked in detail at the care four people received. We spoke to staff about the care given, looked at records related to them, met with them and observed staff working with them. We spoke with two visiting health professional who confirmed that the staff at the home were helpful.

We saw that people's care records described their needs and how those needs were met. We saw that people's mental capacity was assessed to determine if they were able to make particular decisions.

As part of the quality monitoring system, people who live in the home, and their relatives, were sent surveys to complete, that asked their views of the home.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)