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Inspection carried out on 27 July 2017

During a routine inspection

Treeton Grange Nursing Home is situated in the village of Treeton which is approximately six miles from the town of Rotherham. The home stands in large open grounds and provides care for up to 50 older people. Bedroom facilities are provided on the ground and first floor level; access to the first floor is by a lift. There are several communal areas including lounges dining areas and a separate activity room. At the time of this inspection there were 49 peopleliving at the home.

At the last inspection on the March 2015 the service was rated Good.

You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection, by selecting the 'all reports' link for ‘Treeton Grange Nursing Home on our website at www.cqc.org.uk’

At this unannounced inspection on the 27 July 2017 we found the service remained Good. The service met all relevant fundamental standards.

The service has a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. However the registered manager was working their notice and a new manager had been appointed and was working alongside them to enable a full hand over. The new manager had commenced the registration process with CQC.

Staff were knowledgeable about how to recognise signs of potential abuse and aware of the reporting procedures. Assessments identified risks to people and management plans to reduce the risks were in place. People we spoke with told us they felt safe and were extremely positive about the care they received.

Risks had been identified and management systems were in place to monitor risk and reduce incidents ensuring peoples safety. There were also detailed assessments to follow in case of an emergency.

At the time of the inspection there were sufficient staff on duty to meet people’s needs. People and their relatives we spoke with told us they thought there were sufficient staff on duty. Robust recruitments procedures ensured the right staff were employed to meet people’s needs safely.

Systems were in place to ensure management of medicines was safe. Staff received training and competency assessments to administer medications safely. The provider completed regular audits of the system to ensure standards were maintained.

We observed staff and found they took account of people’s individual needs and preferences while supporting them. People were supported to have choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible.

Staff were aware of peoples nutritional needs and people were supported to maintain a balanced diet. People we spoke with told us the food was good. People were also supported to maintain good health and had access to health care services.

People were treated with respect. People and their relatives told us staff were kind and very caring. Staff we spoke with able to tell us how they respected people’s preferences and ensured their privacy and dignity was maintained.

People received personalised care that was responsive to their needs. People told us they could take part in activities of their own choice and that there were also organised group activities. People told us they enjoyed the activities.

There was a system in place to tell people how to raise concerns and how these would be managed. People told us they would feel comfortable raising any concerns with the management team.

People and their relatives who we spoke with were very happy with how the service was run. There were systems in place to monitor and improve the quality of the service provided. Areas for improvements had been identified and action plans were in place these were followed by staff. The provider also had a quality team who monitored the service to ensure

Inspection carried out on 2 and 3 March 2015

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced inspection carried out on 2 and 3 March 2015. We last inspected the service in August 2013 and found they were meeting the Regulations we looked at.

Treeton Grange Nursing Home is situated in the village of Treeton which is approximately six miles from the town of Rotherham. The home stands in large open grounds and provides care for 50 older people. Bedroom facilities are provided on the ground and first floor level; access to the first floor is by a lift. There are several communal areas including lounges dining areas and a separate activity room. At the time of this inspection there were 47 people who used the service living at the home.

The service has a registered manager who has been registered with the Care Quality Commission since July 2014. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons.’ Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe living in Treeton Grange. Everyone we spoke with told us they were confident that they could tell the staff whatever they needed to if they were worried about anything. There were procedures to follow if staff had any concerns about the safety of people they supported.

The requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 were in place to protect people who may not have the capacity to make decisions for themselves. The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) sets out what must be done to make sure that the human rights of people who may lack mental capacity to make decisions are protected, including balancing autonomy and protection in relation to consent or refusal of care or treatment.

People’s physical health was monitored as required. This included the monitoring of people’s health conditions and symptoms so appropriate referrals to health professionals could be made. We also spoke to a visiting GP who said, “The staff act in a timely manner to seek medical advice.” The GP told us a weekly surgery at the home was working very well, and people could also contact the surgery if required at other times during the week.

There were sufficient staff with the right skills and competencies to meet the assessed needs of people living in the home. Staff were aware of people’s nutritional needs and made sure they supported people to have a healthy diet, with choices of a good variety of food and drink. People we spoke with told us they enjoyed the meals and there was always something on the menu they liked.

People were able to access activities. The activity coordinator had developed a weekly plan of activities. People could also access religious services which were held periodically at the home.

We found the home had a friendly relaxed atmosphere which felt homely. Staff approached people in a kind and caring way which encouraged people to express how and when they needed support. Everyone we spoke with told us that they felt that the staff knew them and their likes and dislikes. A person said, “They understand perfectly what my requirements are.”

Staff told us they felt supported and they could raise any concerns with the registered manager and felt that they were listened to. People told us they were aware of the complaints procedure and said staff would assist them if they needed to use it. We noted from the records that no formal complaints had been received in the last 12 months.

There were effective systems in place to monitor and improve the quality of the service provided. We saw copies of reports produced by the registered manager and the provider. The reports included any actions required and these were checked each month to determine progress.

Inspection carried out on 12 August 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with five people who used the service and two visiting relatives. People told us they enjoyed the activities at the home. They said the activity coordinator made sure there was something different to do every-day.

People experienced care, treatment and support that met their needs and protected their rights. People’s relatives said they were happy with the care people received. One relative told us their parent had lived at the home for over two years and they were very satisfied with the care.

We saw that staff treated people with dignity and kindness. We observed that a friendly and positive approach was used, to ensure that the wishes and needs of people using the service were respected.

There were effective systems in place to reduce the risk and spread of infection. This included staff receiving training in this subject and the provision of protective clothing. Relatives we spoke with told us they always found the home to be clean and fresh.

People received care and treatment from suitably qualified, skilled and experienced staff. Appropriate checks had been undertaken before staff began work.

People who lived in the home were kept safe because the provider had taken steps to maintain the building and we saw that regular health and safety checks had been carried out.

People were protected from the risks of unsafe or inappropriate care and treatment because their records had been reviewed and updated regularly.

Inspection carried out on 19 February 2013

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

This inspection was to check if the provider had taken action to address the shortfalls we found regarding the safe handling of medication when we carried out our last inspection in November 2012.

At this visit we saw appropriate arrangements were in place in relation to obtaining, storing, administering, recording and disposing of medicines. The system had been reviewed and new procedures introduced to make sure people received their medication on time and any unwanted medication was disposed of safely.

On this occasion we did not speak to people who used the service. However their experiences were captured through checking records. We also spoke with two members of staff and the provider.

Inspection carried out on 5 November 2012

During a routine inspection

We were only able to speak with a small number of people using this service because most people had complex needs and they were not able to tell us their experiences. We used a number of different methods to help us understand the experiences of people who used the service. This included observing care, looking at records and talking to staff. We also spoke with the relatives of four people using the service.

People we spoke with told us that staff were kind and always treated them with respect. One person said “Staff help me to get dressed and I stay in my room and staff bring me my meals.” Another person told us they chose not to be involved in the activities at the home. People were encouraged to maintain their independence. One person told us they liked to go for a walk in the grounds.

Relatives we spoke with told us that they were happy with the care provided, although one relative told us they had raised a number of concerns which had been looked into by the manager.

We found medication was administered safely to people. However, arrangements for the safe disposal of unused medication required improvement.

Staff received appropriate support and training to ensure they were able to meet the needs of people living at the home. Complaints were investigated and responded to in a timely manner.

Inspection carried out on 28 November 2011

During a routine inspection

People told us that the care provided at the home met their needs and they felt able to tell staff if they needed extra help. People told us they had looked at several homes before choosing Treeton Grange and they knew that it was the right choice. People told us they felt safe at the home and would tell the manager if they had concerns about anything. People said the food was good and there was lots of choice.