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The Abbeyfield East London Extra Care Society Limited Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 26 November 2018

During a routine inspection

The Abbeyfield East London Extra Care Society Limited is also known as George Brooker House. We carried out an unannounced inspection of this service on 26 November 2018. George Brooker House provides accommodation for up to 44 adults including people who may have a diagnosis of dementia. At the time of our inspection 44 people were living at the service.

People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. This service provides personal care. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

The service has a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At our last inspection on 30 March 2016 the service was rated ‘Good'. At this inspection we found that this service continued to be ‘Good.’

Safeguarding procedures were in place and staff had a clear understanding of what abuse was and what to do if they had any safeguarding concerns. Risk assessments were in place and gave details about how to support people in a safe way. Staff were recruited safely, and pre-employment checks had been carried out to ensure they were suitable to support people. Staffing levels were sufficient, so the service could meet people's needs. Medicines were administered and managed safely. Infection control was being managed in a safe way to prevent the spread of infection. Accidents and incidents were recorded and the service learnt lessons to ensure the care provided was safe.

Once employed, staff received a detailed induction to the service and ongoing training to allow them to provide the best support to people. Staff felt supported and received regular supervisions and an annual appraisal to review their practice. The service had completed pre-admission assessments for all people to ensure their needs could be met. People had a choice around their meals and the service worked well with other health and social care teams to ensure people were supported to stay healthy and well. The service had been designed and adapted with people’s support needs in mind. Staff understood the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA). The MCA is a law protecting people who are unable to make decisions for themselves. Where people did not have the capacity to consent to their care and support, the appropriate applications had been made.

Staff were observed to be kind and respectful and knew how to communicate with people and recognise their needs. Staff demonstrated an understanding around equality and diversity; however, information about relationships and sexuality was not discussed. We recommended the service follows best practice guidance to ensure people felt safe and comfortable. People and their relatives were fully involved in their care and support provided. Staff spoke to us about how they maintained people's privacy and dignity and the service promoted people to be as independent as possible.

People received personalised support that was responsive to their individual needs and each person had an up to date care plan. People were encouraged to engage in activities of their choice, both within the service and the local community. People and their relatives felt comfortable raising any issues they might have about the care provided and there were systems in place to deal with complaints. The service provided end of life care that took into consideration individual wishes.

People, relatives and staff spoke positively about the registered manager and felt they were approachable and supportive. The service gathered feedback from people, relatives and staff. This feedback alongside the audits and quality checks meant the se

Inspection carried out on 30 March 2016

During a routine inspection

The Abbeyfield East London Extra Care Society Limited is also known as George Brooker House. The service provides accommodation and support with personal care for up to 44 older people. The service is a large purpose built property divided into three units arranged on two levels. There were 43 people living at the service at the time of our inspection.

The service had a manager who at the time of our inspection was awaiting the outcome of her application to become the registered manager of the service. This application was successful with effect from 22 April 2016. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the last inspection on 26 and 30 January 2015 we found ten breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (regulated activities) Regulations 2014. People were not safe at the service. There were poor arrangements for administration of medicines and infection control. Risk assessments were not completed in a timely manner and did not address the risks to people using the service which put people at risk of harm.

People were not protected against the risks of unsafe or inappropriate care and treatment by monitoring of their medical condition. Staff did not always receive regular supervision or appraisals and there was no line management structure for care staff. Training records showed staff did not receive up to date training in relation to first aid, care planning, mental capacity and record keeping. The service was not well led. The provider did not inform the Care Quality Commission of important events that happened in the service. Following the inspection the provider submitted an action plan for improvement of the service.

We inspected George Brooker House on 30 and 31 March 2016. This was an unannounced inspection. At this inspection we found the service had improved, however further improvements should be made regarding mental capacity assessments for people using the service and some care staff did not have a clear understanding of the Mental Capacity Act (2005). The service did not have a formalised process for reviewing staff progress during the induction of new staff employed at the service. We have made a recommendation about the induction process for the service.

People and their relatives told us they felt safe using the service. Staff knew how to report safeguarding concerns. Risk assessments were completed and management plans put in place to enable people to receive safe care and support. There were effective and up to date systems in place to maintain the safety of the premises and equipment. We found there were enough staff working at the service and recruitment checks were in place to ensure new staff were suitable to work at the service. Medicines were administered and managed safely.

Appropriate applications for Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards had been made and authorised. Staff received appraisals and group supervisions. People using the service had access to healthcare professionals as required to meet their needs.

People were offered a choice of nutritious food and drink. Staff knew people they were supporting including their preferences to ensure personalised care was delivered. People using the service and their relatives told us the service was caring and we observed staff supporting people in a caring and respectful manner. Staff respected people’s privacy and dignity and encouraged independence. People and their relatives knew how to make a complaint.

Regular meetings took place for staff, people using the service and their relatives. The provider carried out satisfaction surveys to find out the views of people and their relatives. The provider had quality assurance systems in place to ide

Inspection carried out on 26 & 30 January 2015

During a routine inspection

George Brooker House provides accommodation and support with personal care for up to 44 older people. The service is a large purpose built property. The accommodation is arranged over two levels. There were 42 people living at the service at the time of our inspection.

This was an unannounced inspection, carried out over two days on 26 and 30 January 2015. During the inspection we spoke with 14 people who lived in the service, three visitors, 15 staff, one volunteer, one member of the executive team, the deputy manager and the registered manager of the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

During our last inspection of George Brooker House on 21 July 2014 the provider was not meeting the legal requirements in relation to cleanliness and infection control, assessing and monitoring the quality of the service provision and staff training in safeguarding people who use the service from abuse.

We found ten breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2010, which corresponds to the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we asked the provider to take at the back of the full version of this report.

People were not always kept safe at the service. There were poor arrangements for the administration of medicines and infection control. Risk assessments were not completed in a timely manner and did not address the risks to people using the service which put people at risk of harm.

Each person had a care plan which set out their individual and assessed needs. However some people were not protected against the risks of unsafe or inappropriate care and treatment by monitoring of their medical condition.

Staff did not always receive regular supervision or appraisals and there was no line management structure for care staff. The training matrix showed that some staff had not received up to date training in relation to first aid, dementia awareness, care planning, mental capacity and record keeping.

Senior staff demonstrated they had an awareness of the Mental Capacity Act 2005, which meant they could support people to make choices and decisions where people did not have capacity.

People told us they felt cared for. People were treated with dignity and respect. The staff knew peoples likes and dislikes.

The provider did not always inform the Care Quality Commission of important events that happen in the service in a timely manner.

 

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Inspection carried out on 21 July 2014

During a routine inspection

This inspection was carried out by two inspectors. We considered all the evidence we had gathered under the outcomes we inspected. We used the information to answer the five questions we always ask:-

� Is the service safe?

� Is the service effective?

� Is the service caring?

� Is the service responsive?

� Is the service well led?

This is a summary of what we found.

Is the service safe?

We spoke with seven people who lived at George Brooker House and one of their relatives. We spent time with people who used the service and observed how they were supported by the staff. We saw staff treating people with respect and dignity. One person we spoke with told us, �People here take care of me, I feel safe.�

People�s individual files indicated risks to the person and how these could be minimised to ensure that they were supported as safely as possible.

Staff had received training in relation to the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). Staff were able to tell us about the process followed. We saw that DoLS applications had been made and appropriate records kept when people needed to be deprived of their liberty in some respect.

The Provider had procedures in place for dealing with infection control and safeguarding of vulnerable adults. There were sixty staff working in the home, however two thirds had not completed safeguarding training. This meant staff were unable to identify the different types of abuse and respond appropriately to safeguarding concerns.

It was also noted that two thirds had not completed infection control training. Staff were unable to identify the different types of infection and respond appropriately to infection control precautions to minimise cross- infection.

Is the service effective?

People�s needs were assessed and care was planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure peoples safety and welfare. We found that care plans were in place and included information about how to meet people's assessed and individual needs.

People�s individual care plans indicated risks to the person and how these could be minimised to ensure they were supported as safely as possible.

Is the service caring?

People told us they felt comfortable, happy and safe living at the home. We spoke with one relative of a person living in the home. They said they were happy with the care given at the home and found staff to be caring and friendly.

We saw that staff supported people in a respectful and kind way. One person told us, �Staff are gentle when they take care of me.�

Is the service responsive?

People spoke positively about the home and the care they received. People told us they were involved in planning their care. We looked at care plans which were reviewed monthly and were responsive to people�s changing needs. Some care plans were reviewed sooner in response to people�s changing needs. Care staff told us how they assessed people�s needs and how they cared for them.

Is the service well led?

The service had a registered manager in place. Staff we spoke with told us they found the manager to be approachable and accessible. They received the support and guidance needed to carry out their duties and to meet people�s needs.

The provider carried out an annual satisfaction survey but did not evaluate the responses.

The provider did not have procedures in place to assess and monitor the quality of service provided to people living in George Brooker House. This meant there were no means of assessing the quality of the service provided.

Inspection carried out on 21 January 2014

During a routine inspection

People told us they were happy and safe in the home. They were asked for their permission before care and treatment were given and the relatives felt that the home consulted them and kept them informed about their family members. One person said if they wanted to go out for a meal, the staff facilitated this.

We found that care was planned and delivered in line with the assessments of needs; risks were assessed and minimised. The care records contained essential personal and medical information.

The home was clean and tidy and the rooms were cleaned daily. One person told us, "The place is very clean. My room is like my own front room at home." The communal areas, including the sitting rooms, bathrooms and toilets were clean.

The provider supported the staff in their training and there was evidence of regular training for existing staff and a good induction programme for new starters. The placement students we spoke to felt supported at the home and wanted to work there permanently.

The residents, their relatives and the staff felt able to make suggestions or comments to the provider. Comments and suggestions received were acted upon. The provider received one complaint in the last two years and dealt with the complaint satisfactorily.

Inspection carried out on 5 March 2013

During a routine inspection

People told us that they were able to make choices over their care, and treated with dignity. One person said "they poke their head round the door and ask if I want to get up now. I might say yes or no, it's up to me." We observed staff interacting with people in a friendly and polite manner. We found that care plans were in place for people, although these lacked some details of the care to be provided to people. Records showed people had access to health care professionals including GP's and dieticians.

People told us they received support with their medication. One person said "I know what my tablets are for, the staff tell me." We found that medications were stored securely and staff had undertaken training on the administration of medications. People told us they were happy with the home's physical environment and we found steps had been taken to make the environment safe. We found that there was enough staff on duty to meet people's needs.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)