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Archived: Little Sutton Lane Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 3 August 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 3 August 2016 and was announced. We last inspected the service in July 2015. The service was assessed as good but we identified a breach in the regulations in regards to the provider’s systems for auditing the quality of the service. At this inspection we found this had been rectified.

The service is registered to provide care for up to four people who have a learning disability. Two people lived there at the time of our inspection. A registered manager was in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People who used the service and their relatives told us that the home was safe. We observed people looking relaxed and at ease within the home, and with the staff who were supporting them. Staff were aware of the need to keep people safe and they knew how to report allegations or suspicions of poor practice. People received their medication safely.

There were sufficient appropriately trained, skilled and supervised staff and they received opportunities to further develop their skills.

The registered manager had approached the appropriate authority when it was felt that there was a risk people were being supported in a way which could restrict their freedom. Staff had been provided with training about the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) but not all staff were aware that Deprivation of Liberty applications had been submitted.

People were supported to maintain good health and to access appropriate support from health professionals where needed. People were supported to have food that they enjoyed and meal times were flexible to meet people's needs.

People told us that they were happy at this home and this was confirmed by people's relatives. We observed caring staff practice, and staff we spoke with demonstrated a positive regard for the people they were supporting. People and, where appropriate, their relatives, were consulted about their preferences and people were treated with dignity and respect. People’s needs had been assessed and care plans developed to inform staff how to support people appropriately.

There were systems in place if people wished to make a complaint. The registered manager was aware of his responsibilities and had the skills and experience required to enable them to effectively lead this service.

Inspection carried out on 22 July 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 22 July 2015 and was unannounced. This is the first inspection of the home since it was registered with us in December 2013.

The single storey home is registered to provide accommodation and personal care to up to four people at any time. The home provides care to adults with a learning disability and / or autistic spectrum disorders. At the time of our inspection there were two people living there.

The location is required to have a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run. At the time of this inspection the home did not have a registered manager in post. However, the provider, Midland Heart Limited, had placed an acting manager to oversee the home.

Staff knew how to reduce the risk of harm to people from abuse and unsafe practice. Most risks of harm to people receiving the service had been assessed and recorded. Although policies and guidance for staff were in place so that people were safely supported with taking their prescribed medicines, some records of medicines were not always clear.

People, their relatives and staff felt that there were sufficient numbers of staff on shift to meet people’s needs. There were procedures in place to recruit staff safely to work with vulnerable people.

Staff had the skills and knowledge to care and support their family member. Staff were inducted into their job role and did receive training. However, key training topics such as supporting people with autism, did not always take place as soon as some staff felt it should to give them the skills needed for their job role.

People were supported by staff to access health and social care professionals whenever needed. Staff followed the advice and guidance of health care professionals.

Staff were caring and treated people with dignity and respect.

People and / or their relatives felt they could speak to staff about any concerns that they had and that they would be listened to and their concern addressed.

The provider had quality assurance systems in place to monitor the care and support people received. Some systems were effective in identifying actions that were needed to make improvement to the service. However, we found that some were not effective.