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Birmingham Women's Hospital Good

This service was previously managed by a different provider - see old profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 2 Apr to 25 Apr 2019

During a routine inspection

The Birmingham Women’s Hospital became part of The Birmingham Women’s and Children’s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in February 2017. This meant our ratings from the last inspection of this hospital in 2016, no longer applied at the time of this 2019 inspection.

We rated it them as good because:

  • Our rating for safe was requires improvement overall. The service provided mandatory training in key skills however this was not accurately recorded on the electronic system which meant staff were reliant on their local records to monitor compliance. Some elements of the mandatory training for maternity staff were not included on the electronic system, and compliance rates were skewed by including staff who were off sick or on maternity leave. This meant it was difficult to get a clear picture of compliance rates for all maternity staff for all required training. Staff understood how to protect patients from abuse and the service worked well with other agencies to do so. The service had enough staff with the right qualifications, skills, training and experience to keep people safe from avoidable harm and to provide the right care and treatment.
  • Our rating for effective was good overall. The service provided care and treatment based on national guidance and evidence of its effectiveness. Staff gave neonates enough food and drink to meet their needs and improve their health. They used special feeding and hydration techniques when necessary. All those responsible for delivering care worked together as a team to benefit women.
  • Our rating for caring was good overall. Staff treated women with compassion and kindness, respected their privacy and dignity, and took account of their individual needs. Staff provided appropriate help and support for women before and after a termination of pregnancy or miscarriage. We observed staff involve patients and those close to them in decisions about their care and treatment during our inspection.
  • Our rating for responsive was good overall. The trust planned and provided services in a way that met the needs of local people. Staff within the service took account of women’s individual needs. They identified when women’s needs and choices were not being met, and used information to inform how services were improved and developed.
  • Our rating for well-led was good overall. Managers had the right skills and abilities to run a service providing high-quality sustainable care. Managers across the service promoted a positive culture that supported and valued staff, creating a sense of common purpose based on shared values. The service had effective systems for identifying risks, planning to eliminate or reduce them, and coping with both the expected and unexpected. Although Radiology managers at all levels did not have the right skills and abilities to run imaging services and provide high-quality sustainable care. Local leaders in the medicine clinical group, which included radiology, were not aware of all the risks and challenges in the service.