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We are carrying out a review of quality at Leymar Healthcare. We will publish a report when our review is complete. Find out more about our inspection reports.

Reports


Inspection carried out on 16 November 2017

During a routine inspection

Leymar Healthcare is a domiciliary care agency. It provides personal care to people living in their own houses and flats. It provides a service to older adults and younger disabled adults in and around the Ashfield District. The organisation provides other support that is not regulated by us including support in the community. On our last inspection on 22 and 27 July 2015 the service was rated as Good, on this inspection we found the service remained Good.

The service had a manager in place at the time of our inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons.’ Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People continued to receive safe care. Risks to people’s health and wellbeing were assessed and plans were in place to monitor people and to assist them in a safe manner. The staff understood how to protect people from harm and were confident that any concerns would be reported and investigated by the manager. Some people received assistance to take medicines and records were kept to ensure that this was done safely. There were safe recruitment procedures in place to ensure new staff were suitable to work with people.

People continued to receive effective care. Staff were supported and trained to ensure that they had the skills to support people effectively. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff support them in the least restrictive way possible. People were able to make decisions about how they wanted to receive support to ensure their health needs were met. When people required assistance to eat and drink, the provider ensured that this was planned to meet their preferences and assessed need.

The care people received remained good. People had a small team of staff who provided their support and had caring relationships with them. Care was planned and reviewed with people and the provider ensured that people’s choices were followed. People’s privacy and dignity were respected and upheld by the staff who supported them.

The service remained responsive. People had care records that included information about how they wanted to be supported and this was reviewed to reflect any changing needs. There was a complaints procedure in place and any concern received were investigated and responded to in line with this policy.

The service remained well led. People were asked for their feedback on the quality of the service and their contribution supported the development of the service. Quality assurance systems were in place to identify where improvements could be made and the provider worked with other organisations to share ideas and to develop the service. The manager promoted an open culture which put people at the heart of the service.

Inspection carried out on 22 and 27 July 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 22 and 27July 2015. Leymar Healthcare is a small domiciliary care service which provides personal care and support to people in their own homes. On the day of our inspection five people were using the service.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. On the day of our inspection the registered provided assisted us with the inspection process.

People felt safe whilst receiving care from staff. We found staff had received training to ensure they had the knowledge and skills to care for people effectively and they understood their responsibilities in protecting people from the risk of abuse.

People received the support required to safely manage their medicines and people received the support they required to have enough to eat and drink.

Risks to people’s health and safety were managed and people were supported by a sufficient number of staff.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) monitors the use of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA).

We found the registered provider was aware of this legislation and ensured it would be used correctly to protect people who were not able to make their own decisions about the care they received.

People were treated with kindness by staff who had developed caring relationships and people old us they were treated with dignity and respect. People were also encouraged to be involved in the planning and reviewing of their care package to ensure their care package was responsive to their changing needs. Staff helped people to maintain any hobbies and interests within their home and the community when able.

People could make comments on the quality of the service and there were effective systems in place to monitor the quality of the service. The culture of the service was open and honest and the registered provider encouraged open communication. People also felt able to make a complaint and felt any complaints would be taken seriously.