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Inspection carried out on 19 September 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Somerford Place is a residential care home that provides personal care for up to six adults with a learning disability, autism or a mental health problem. At the time of the inspection six people were residing at the home.

The original home had been divided into two smaller units, the residential home and a supported living unit next door. This reduction in size was in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them. Staff were discouraged from wearing anything that suggested they were care staff when coming and going with people.

The Secretary of State has asked the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to conduct a thematic review and to make recommendations about the use of restrictive interventions in settings that provide care for people with or who might have mental health problems, learning disabilities and/or autism. Thematic reviews look in-depth at specific issues concerning quality of care across the health and social care sectors. They expand our understanding of both good and poor practice and of the potential drivers of improvement.

As part of thematic review, we carried out a survey with the registered manager at this inspection. This considered whether the service used any restrictive intervention practices (restraint, seclusion and segregation) when supporting people.

The service used some restrictive intervention practices as a last resort, in a person-centred way, in line with positive behaviour support principles.

People's experience of using this service and what we found

People trusted the staff and felt safe with them. Staff understood their responsibilities to keep people safe from potential abuse, bullying or discrimination. Staff knew what to look out for that might indicate a person was being abused.

Staff treated people as unique individuals who had different likes, dislikes, needs and preferences. Staff and management made sure no one was disadvantaged because of their age, gender, sexual orientation, disability or culture. Staff understood the importance of upholding and respecting people's diversity. Staff challenged discriminatory practice.

Where possible people were involved in all aspects of their care decisions and assessing potential risks to their safety. Ways to reduce these risks had been explored and were being followed appropriately.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

Staff understood the way people expressed their views and the service made sure no one was disadvantaged because of the different ways people communicated.

Everyone had an individual plan of care which was reviewed on a regular basis.

All staff had clear roles and responsibilities and understood the values of the service.

Staff had been trained and suitable policies and systems were in place to help manage medicines safely. People told us they were satisfied with the support they received to manage their medicines.

Staff were positive about working for the organisation and told us they appreciated the support, encouragement they received from the registered manager.

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