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Reports


Review carried out on 10 January 2020

During an annual regulatory review

We reviewed the information available to us about Chipping Surgery on 10 January 2020. We did not find evidence of significant changes to the quality of service being provided since the last inspection. As a result, we decided not to inspect the surgery at this time. We will continue to monitor this information about this service throughout the year and may inspect the surgery when we see evidence of potential changes.

Inspection carried out on 29 September 2016

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Chipping Surgery on 29 September 2016. Overall the practice is rated as good.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows:

  • There was an open and transparent approach to safety and an effective system in place for reporting and recording significant events.
  • Risks to patients were assessed and well managed.
  • Staff assessed patients’ needs and delivered care in line with current evidence based guidance. Staff had been trained to provide them with the skills, knowledge and experience to deliver effective care and treatment.
  • Patients said they were treated with compassion, dignity and respect and they were involved in their care and decisions about their treatment.
  • Information about services and how to complain was available and easy to understand. Improvements were made to the quality of care as a result of complaints and concerns.
  • Patients said they found it easy to make an appointment with a named GP and there was continuity of care, with urgent appointments available the same day.
  • The practice had good facilities and was well equipped to treat patients and meet their needs.
  • The practice was participating in a research programme for the early identification of patients at risk of stroke. There was a monitor in the waiting area where patient could place their hands on the machine and this would inform them if they were at risk or not. If patients were at risk, they would be referred for further treatment.

  • There was a clear leadership structure and staff felt supported by management. The practice proactively sought feedback from staff and patients, which it acted on.
  • The provider was aware of and complied with the requirements of the duty of candour.

The areas where the provider should make improvement are:

  • Review the location and provision of emergency medicines.

  • Ensure that a legionella risks assessment (a report by a competent person giving details as to how to reduce the risk of the legionella bacterium spreading through water and other systems in the work place) is carried out.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection carried out on 21 January 2015

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at The Chipping Surgery on 21 January 2015. Overall the practice is rated as GOOD.

We found the practice to be good for providing responsive, effective, caring, services for older adults, families and children, patients with long term conditions, vulnerable patients, patients with mental health issues and patients who worked. It required improvement for providing safe services in regard of the use and management of medicines.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows:

  • Staff understood and fulfilled their responsibilities to raise concerns, and to report incidents and near misses. Information about safety was recorded, monitored, appropriately reviewed and addressed.
  • Risks to patients were assessed and well managed, with the exception of those relating to medicines.
  • Patients’ needs were assessed and care was planned and delivered following best practice guidance. Staff had received training appropriate to their roles and any further training needs had been identified and planned.
  • Patients said they were treated with compassion, dignity and respect and they were involved in their care and decisions about their treatment.
  • Information about services and how to complain was available and easy to understand.
  • Patients said they found it easy to make an appointment with a named GP and that there was continuity of care, with urgent appointments available the same day.
  • The practice had good facilities and was well equipped to treat patients and meet their needs.
  • There was a clear leadership structure and staff felt supported by management. The practice proactively sought feedback from staff and patients, which it acted on.
  • The practice provided general health advice including a sexual health support to young people living in the area and who may not have been registered with the practice.
  • Some dispensed medicines were delivered to people’s homes and there were local collection points in outlying villages.

The Provider MUST:

  • Ensure that the storage of blank prescription prescriptions and dispensing of medicines meets legislative requirements and current practice guidance.

The provider SHOULD:

  • Ensure there is a system to regularly review staff records to assure staff are appropriately prepared to undertake their role such as ensuring there are up to date records of staff continuing professional development and staff hepatitis B status.
  • Ensure the infection control audit action plans are in place and monitored to ensure actions have been followed through.
  • Ensure the procedure allowing practice staff authorised for access to the dispensary is based on a risk assessment.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice