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Shere Surgery/Dispensary Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 25 Sept 2019

During a routine inspection

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Shere Surgery / Dispensary on 25 September 2019 as part of our inspection programme.

We had previously carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Shere Surgery / Dispensary in October 2014 and a focused inspection in October 2015. The practice was last rated as Good overall and Good in all domains. All of the practices’ previous reports can be found by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for Shere Surgery / Dispensary on our website www.cqc.org.uk

We carried out an inspection of this service due to the length of time since the last inspection. Following our review of the information available to us, including information provided by the practice, we focused our inspection on the following key questions:

  • Is it Safe
  • Is it Effective
  • Is it Caring
  • Is it Responsive
  • Is it Well led

We have rated this practice as good overall and in all of the key questions. They have been rated as good overall for all population groups.

We based our judgement of the quality of care at this service on a combination of:

  • what we found when we inspected
  • information from our ongoing monitoring of data about services and
  • information from the provider, patients, the public and other organisations.

We rated the practice good for providing safe, effective, caring, responsive and well-led care because:

  • The practice provided care in a way that kept patients safe and protected them from avoidable harm.
  • Patients received effective care and treatment that met their needs.
  • Staff dealt with patients with kindness and respect and involved them in decisions about their care.
  • The practice organised and delivered services to meet patients’ needs.
  • Patients could access care and treatment in a timely way.
  • The way the practice was led and managed promoted the delivery of high-quality, person-centre care.
  • There was a clear leadership structure and staff felt supported by management.
  • Staff worked well together as a team and all felt supported to carry out their roles. There was a strong team ethos and culture of working together for a common aim.
  • The practice, with help from the local charity SALV (Shere and local villages), was able to offer their patients in house ultrasounds, microsuction and ear irrigation, a dermatoscopy service, women’s health initiatives and direct patients to a ‘Villages Helpline’ for patients who were potentially lonely or isolated.
  • The practice were winners at the 2018 National GP Awards for Women’s Health Initiative.
  • The practice continued to improve access to mental health services for all patients. For example, young people could be offered cognitive behavioural therapy in house.

Whilst we found no breaches of regulations, the provider should:

  • Review and continue to monitor cervical smear screening to meet Public Health England screening rate target
  • Review and continue to monitor child immunisation rates to meet World Health Organisation (WHO) targets

Details of our findings and the evidence supporting our ratings are set out in the evidence tables.

Dr Rosie Benneyworth BM BS BMedSci MRCGP

Chief Inspector of Primary Medical Services and Integrated Care

Inspection carried out on 16 October 2015

During an inspection looking at part of the service

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection of this practice on 16 October 2014. Breaches of legal requirements were found in relation to the safe management of medicines and cleanliness and infection control. After the comprehensive inspection, the practice wrote to us to say what they would do to meet legal requirements. We undertook this focused inspection on 16 October 2015 to check that they had followed their plan and to confirm that they now met legal requirements. This report only covers our findings in relation to those requirements.

Our previous report also highlighted areas where the practice should improve:-

  • Consider monitoring the room temperatures where medicines are stored

Our key findings across the areas we inspected for this focused inspection were as follows:-

  • Blank prescription forms were handled in line with current guidance from NHS Protect.
  • All controlled drugs were stored appropriately in line with the practice’s procedures
  • The practice no longer supported arrangements patients made themselves for the remote collection of dispensed prescriptions.
  • All modesty covers were single use only.
  • An audit of infection control had been undertaken and the practice had arrangements in place to ensure this was undertaken on an annual basis.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection carried out on 16 October 2014

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We have rated the practice as good. We found that the practice provided an effective and responsive service to all patients. Feedback from patients showed that the practice was caring and responsive to their needs. Staff worked well as a team and aspired to deliver excellent patient care.

Our key findings were as follows:

  • Information about significant events including accidents, near misses and complaints was recorded and monitored. The learning from these was used to support improvement.
  • Staff received appropriate professional development and felt well supported in their roles.
  • Patients consistently described the service they received as professional, efficient and caring.

We saw one area of outstanding practice. This was:

  • The work the practice had undertaken to improve access to mental health services.

However, there were also areas of practice where the provider needs to make improvements.

Importantly, the provider must:

  • Handle blank prescription forms in line with current guidance from NHS Protect.
  • Store all controlled drugs appropriately in line with the practice’s procedures.
  • Put safe processes in place for the remote collection of dispensed prescriptions.
  • Undertake an audit of infection control on an annual basis.
  • Use single use and disposable items used to cover patients during examinations.

In addition, the provider should;

  • Consider monitoring the room temperatures where medicines are stored.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice