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North STSS (Short Term Support Service) Alnwick Outstanding

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Outstanding

Updated 1 June 2018

This inspection took place on 20 February, 8 March and 12 March 2018 and was announced. This was to ensure someone would be available at the office to speak with us and show us records.

North STSS (Short Term Support Service) Alnwick is provided by Northumberland County Council in partnership with Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust. It provides three distinct services; re-ablement, crisis intervention and a ‘bridging’ service. Re-ablement concentrated on supporting predominantly older people following a recent illness, hospital admission or an exacerbation of a longer term condition, with the aim of getting them back to an optimal level of independence. The crisis intervention service supported those who required immediate support due to a sudden change in their circumstances such as an accident or acute illness. The bridging service supported people until a long term provider was assigned.

At the time of the inspection, the service was providing personal care and support to 31 people in their own homes.

The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with CQC to manage the service. Like providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

North STSS (Short Term Support Service) Alnwick was last inspected by CQC in November 2015 and was rated Good. At this inspection we found the service had improved to Outstanding.

The service was very flexible and extremely responsive to people’s needs. We saw and heard how staff went above and beyond their role.

The service used a number of research based assessment tools to ensure the best possible outcomes for people, and employed occupational therapists and physiotherapists to work alongside care staff.

People’s care and support was planned proactively with them in a person centred way. People’s preferences and choices were clearly documented in their care records and people told us they were involved in the care they received. The service had used case studies to review the support people had received and identify good practice or lessons learned.

There were consistently high levels of constructive engagement with staff and people who used the service. Staff felt supported by the registered manager and said there was an “open door policy” at the service. Policies and procedures were in place to keep staff safe, and management and office staff provided outstanding support to care staff.

People who used the service and health and social care professionals were extremely positive about the service. The service worked collaboratively with other organisations and local charities.

Governance was well embedded into the running of the service. Service quality and improvement was high on the organisational agenda and was measured through a variety of audits, satisfaction questionnaires and performance dashboards.

There was a strong emphasis on continually striving to improve. The service had an electronic monitoring system in place. The registered manager told us it helped them “effectively manage resources” and achieve “value for money”.

People who used the service and family members were extremely complimentary about the standard of care at North STSS (Short Term Support Service) Alnwick.

Staff respected people’s privacy and dignity. People spoke positively about how staff respected their privacy and dignity while carrying out personal care, and the support they received to help them regain their independence.

Accidents and incidents were appropriately recorded and investigated. Risk assessments were in place for people who used the service and staff, and described potential risks and the safeguards in place to mitigate these risks.

The registered manager understood their responsibilities with regard to safeguarding and staff had been trained in safeguarding vu

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 1 June 2018

The service was safe.

Staffing levels were appropriate to meet the needs of people who used the service. No new members of staff had been recruited since the last inspection.

Accidents and incidents were appropriately recorded and investigated, and risk assessments were in place for people and staff.

The registered manager was aware of their responsibilities with regards to safeguarding and staff had been trained in how to protect vulnerable adults.

Effective

Good

Updated 1 June 2018

The service was effective.

Staff were suitably trained and received regular supervisions and appraisals.

People�s needs were assessed before they began using the service.

The provider was working within the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA).

Caring

Good

Updated 1 June 2018

The service was caring.

People and family members told us staff were very caring.

The service enabled people to regain their independence.

Respect for privacy and dignity was embedded in the service and people�s care and support was planned proactively with them.

Responsive

Outstanding

Updated 1 June 2018

The service was exceptionally responsive.

The service was very flexible and responsive to people�s individual needs and preferences.

Care and support was planned with people in a person centred way.

People were actively encouraged to provide their views and raise concerns or complaints.

Well-led

Outstanding

Updated 1 June 2018

The service was exceptionally well-led.

People, staff and health and social care professionals were extremely positive about the quality of the service.

The provider had an integrated model of care to facilitate hospital discharges.

There were a number of processes in place to gauge the quality of the service and there was a strong emphasis on improvement.