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Lambton Road Medical Partnership Good Also known as Dr Dhalla and Dr Molony Partnership

Reports


Review carried out on 9 September 2021

During a monthly review of our data

We carried out a review of the data available to us about Lambton Road Medical Partnership on 9 September 2021. We have not found evidence that we need to carry out an inspection or reassess our rating at this stage.

This could change at any time if we receive new information. We will continue to monitor data about this service.

If you have concerns about Lambton Road Medical Partnership, you can give feedback on this service.

Review carried out on 9 August 2019

During an annual regulatory review

We reviewed the information available to us about Lambton Road Medical Partnership on 9 August 2019. We did not find evidence of significant changes to the quality of service being provided since the last inspection. As a result, we decided not to inspect the surgery at this time. We will continue to monitor this information about this service throughout the year and may inspect the surgery when we see evidence of potential changes.

Inspection carried out on 23 October 2017

During an inspection looking at part of the service

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection of Lambton Road Medical Partnership on 12 April 2016. The overall rating for the practice was good. However, the practice was rated as requires improvement for providing safe services. This was because not all staff had received timely access to mandatory training specifically safeguarding training, fire safety training and basic life support training.

A further announced desk-based focused inspection was carried out on 14 December 2016 to confirm that the practice had carried out their plan to meet the legal requirements in relation to the breaches in regulations that we identified in our previous comprehensive inspection on 12 April 2016. During the desk-based inspection we found that safeguarding training and fire training were still not up to date for some staff. Consequently, the practice was still rated as requires improvement for providing safe services.

The full comprehensive report and desk-based focussed inspection report can be found by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for Lambton Road Medical Partnership on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

This inspection was an announced focused inspection carried out on 23 October 2017 to confirm that the practice had carried out their plan to meet the legal requirements in relation to the breach in regulation 17 that we identified in our previous inspection on 14 December 2016. This report covers our findings in relation to those requirements and also additional improvements made since our last inspection.

Overall the practice is now rated as good. Specifically the practice was now found to be good for providing safe services.

Our key findings were as follows:

  • Of 50 staff training records checked, 47 members of staff had undertaken annual basic life support training. Three members of staff had training booked for November 2017.

  • All 50 staff members had undertaken the appropriate level of safeguarding children’s training.

  • All staff members had undertaken the appropriate level of safeguarding adult’s training.

  • All staff had completed annual fire training apart from one locum GP.

  • All staff had completed annual infection control training apart from one locum GP.

  • All staff had completed annual information governance training apart from two locum GPs.

  • Five members of clinical staff had received training in the Mental Capacity Act; however shortly following the inspection the remaining 16 clinical staff had undertaken online MCA training apart from 2 locum GPs.

  • The practice had put in place a new procedure to monitor staff training records.

  • Since the previous inspection the practice had installed a new telephone system with an automated appointment system, which was being regularly audited.

  • Since the previous inspection the practice had increased reception staffing by two additional full-time roles.

However, there were also areas of practice where the provider needs to make improvements.

The provider should:

  • Keep records of assurance of mandatory training for temporary staff including locum GPs.

Professor Steve Field CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection carried out on 14 December 2016

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection of Lambton Road Medical Partnership on 12 April 2016. The overall rating for the practice was Good. However, the practice was rated as requires improvement for providing safe services. This was because not all staff had received timely access to mandatory training specifically safeguarding training, fire safety training and basic life support training. The full comprehensive report can be found by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for Lambton Road Medical Partnership on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

This inspection was a desk-based review carried out on 14 December 2016 to confirm that the practice had carried out their plan to meet the legal requirements in relation to the breaches in regulations that we identified in our previous inspection on 12 April 2016. This report covers our findings in relation to those requirements and also additional improvements made since our last inspection.

Overall the practice is now rated as Good however, the practice remains as requires improvement for providing safe services.

Our key findings were as follows:

  • Most staff had completed the appropriate level of safeguarding training; however, we found two members of clinical staff completed this after the inspection.
  • All staff had completed role appropriate training including basic life support.
  • All staff had completed fire training; however we found two members of clinical staff completed this after the inspection.
  • The practice had a significant event and incident reporting procedure policy.
  • The practice had a duty of candour policy.
  • Thorough recruitment checks had been undertaken.
  • There was an effective system in place to identify and support all patients acting as carers.
  • There was an effective system in place to monitor vaccine refrigerator temperatures if they had fallen outside of range.
  • Staff working across two provider organisations had signed confidentiality agreements.
  • The practice had reviewed it’s complaints policy and an effective systems was in place to improve quality of care from complaints received.

However, there were also areas of practice where the provider needs to make improvements.

Importantly, the provider must:

  • Ensure they maintain and monitor records of staff training to identify training needs effectively.

At our previous inspection on 12 April 2016, we rated the practice as requires improvement for providing safe services due to staff not receiving timely access to mandatory training specifically safeguarding training, fire safety training and basic life support training. At this inspection we found that safeguarding training and fire training were still not up to date for some staff. Consequently, the practice is still rated as requires improvement for providing safe services.

Professor Steve Field CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection carried out on 12 April 2016

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Lambton Road Medical Partnership on 12 April 2016. Overall the practice is rated as Good.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows:

  • There was an open and transparent approach to safety and an effective system in place for reporting and recording significant events.
  • Risks to patients were assessed and well managed, with the exception of those relating to recruitment checks and timely mandatory training.
  • Staff assessed patients’ needs and delivered care in line with current evidence based guidance. Staff had been trained to provide them with the skills, knowledge and experience to deliver effective care and treatment.
  • Patients said they were treated with compassion, dignity and respect and they were involved in their care and decisions about their treatment.
  • The practice were aware of the needs of the local population and had tailored services to reflect this.
  • Information about services and how to complain was available and easy to understand, however it was not always clear whether improvements were made to the quality of care as a result of complaints and concerns.
  • Patients said they did not always find it easy to make an appointment with a named GP however urgent appointments were available the same day and those requiring urgent medical attention were seen.
  • The practice had good facilities and was well equipped to treat patients and meet their needs.
  • There was a clear leadership structure and staff felt supported by management. The practice proactively sought feedback from staff and patients, which it acted on.
  • The provider was aware of and complied with the requirements of the duty of candour, however there was no policy outlining the responsibilities of the practice in relation to this.

We saw two areas of outstanding practice:

  • The practice provided the over 75s with an information pack which included a booklet produced in conjunction with the Patient Participation Group (PPG), entitled ‘Local Services for Older People’. This contained detailed information about support and welfare services, social services, voluntary organisations and support for ethnic minority groups.
  • The practice employed an in-house pharmacist to assist with medication reviews, who specifically focussed on a review of prescribing for practice patients in a local nursing home.

The areas where the provider must make improvement are:

  • Ensure that all staff receive updated mandatory safeguarding training relevant to their role.
  • Ensure that staff have access to annual basic life support training in line with recommended guidance and ensure that all staff are adequately trained in fire safety.

In addition the provide should:

  • Consider reviewing the significant event and incident reporting procedure to ensure there is a documented process for all staff to follow.
  • Ensure that robust systems are in place for staff to act where the refrigerator temperatures fall outside of the required range.
  • Ensure that recruitment arrangements include all necessary employment checks for staff.
  • Ensure that information is easily accessible for patients in patient areas to signpost them to support organisations and to adequately inform them about services available.
  • Ensure that the practice has robust systems in place to be able to identify and support all patients acting as carers.
  • Ensure that robust processes are in place for patient confidentiality for staff working between organisations.
  • Ensure that the practice reviews its complaints policy and that robust systems are in place to improve quality of care from complaints received.
  • Ensure that the practice has a duty of candour policy in place.

Professor Steve Field CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP 

Chief Inspector of General Practice