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Beacon View Medical Centre Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 22 August 2018

Professor Steve Field CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 22 August 2018

At our previous inspection on 11 December 2017 we rated the practice as requires improvement for providing safe services. This was because:

  • Disclosure and barring service (DBS) checks had not been undertaken for non-clinical staff. There was no risk assessment in place detailing why this was not considered to be necessary
  • The practice did not have supply of oxygen for use during medical emergencies
  • Non-clinical staff had not received training to help them recognise and prioritise patients with possible signs of sepsis
  • There was no routine clinical oversight or monitoring of secondary care patient related communications to ensure all relevant action and medicine changes had been actioned. A significant event in relation to this in November 2016 had not resulted in a change in process.

When we carried out this follow up inspection on 9 August 2018 we found that action had been taken to address these concerns. The practice is now rated as good for providing safe services.

Safety systems and processes

Disclosure and Barring Service checks were undertaken for all non-clinical staff (DBS checks identify whether a person has a criminal record or is an official list of people barred from working in roles where they may have contact with vulnerable children or adults). The practice had updated their DBS check policy in December 2017 to include a risk assessment. This stated that non-clinical staff were not required to have a DBS check as their roles meant that they would not have direct, one to one contact with vulnerable adults or children and would not perform chaperone duties.

Risks to patients

Since our previous inspection in December 2017 the practice had purchased a supply of oxygen for use during medical emergencies. A protocol had been developed to govern the safe handling, use and transportation of oxygen within the practice. The practice nurse had been identified as the lead for checking and replacing the oxygen and a process was in place to ensure levels were checked after use.

Clinicians knew how to identify and manage patients with severe infections, including sepsis. Non-clinical staff were in the process of receiving online training to help them recognise the signs of sepsis and a schedule was in place to ensure this was completed soon. An additional sepsis training session with the local clinical commissioning group was planned for September 2018.

A system was now in place to ensure there was regular clinical oversight of hospital discharge information and other secondary care patient communications, including changes to, or implementation of medication. One of the practice GPs reviewed a random selection of a days secondary care communications on a monthly basis to ensure appropriate action had been taken. Since February 2018 the GPs had reviewed 134 communications and had found that all had been actioned appropriately. This included ensuring medication changes had been reviewed by the practice pharmacist and patient records updated accordingly.

Effective

Good

Updated 6 February 2018

Caring

Good

Updated 6 February 2018

Responsive

Good

Updated 6 February 2018

Well-led

Good

Updated 6 February 2018

Checks on specific services

People with long term conditions

Good

Updated 6 February 2018

Families, children and young people

Good

Updated 6 February 2018

Older people

Good

Updated 6 February 2018

Working age people (including those recently retired and students)

Good

Updated 6 February 2018

People experiencing poor mental health (including people with dementia)

Good

Updated 6 February 2018

People whose circumstances may make them vulnerable

Good

Updated 6 February 2018