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Review carried out on 9 September 2021

During a monthly review of our data

We carried out a review of the data available to us about Springfield Surgery on 9 September 2021. We have not found evidence that we need to carry out an inspection or reassess our rating at this stage.

This could change at any time if we receive new information. We will continue to monitor data about this service.

If you have concerns about Springfield Surgery, you can give feedback on this service.

Review carried out on 11 December 2019

During an annual regulatory review

We reviewed the information available to us about Springfield Surgery on 11 December 2019. We did not find evidence of significant changes to the quality of service being provided since the last inspection. As a result, we decided not to inspect the surgery at this time. We will continue to monitor this information about this service throughout the year and may inspect the surgery when we see evidence of potential changes.

Inspection carried out on 01/12/2016

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Springfield Surgery on 30 September 2015. The overall rating for the practice at that time was requires improvement. The full comprehensive report from that inspection can be found by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for Springfield Surgery on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

This inspection was undertaken on 01 December 2016 to determine if the practice had made improvements since our last inspection. Overall the practice is now rated as Good.

Our key findings were as follows:

  • There was an open and transparent approach to safety and an effective system in place for reporting and recording significant events. The practice had instilled a clear system to ensure risks to patients were assessed and well managed.
  • Staff assessed patients’ needs and delivered care in line with current evidence based guidance. Staff had been trained to provide them with the skills, knowledge and experience to deliver effective care and treatment.
  • Feedback received from patients from the completed CQC comment cards was positive. Patients told us they were impressed by the professional attitude and caring approach of the staff.
  • Dispensary staff showed us standard procedures which covered all aspects of the dispensing process (these are written instructions about how to safely dispense medicines). We saw evidence of regular review of these procedures in response to incidents or changes to guidance in addition to annual review.
  • Members of the patient participation group (PPG) we spoke with were positive about the practice and the care provided. The practice met regularly with the PPG and responded positively to proposals for improvements.
  • Infection prevention and control systems were comprehensive and environmental checks, including legionella testing were all up to date
  • Information about services and how to complain was available and easy to understand. Improvements were made to the quality of care as a result of complaints and concerns.
  • The practice occupied a purpose built health centre, had good facilities and was well equipped to treat patients and meet their needs.
  • There was a clear leadership structure and staff felt supported by management. The practice proactively sought feedback from staff and patients, which it acted on.
  • Risks to patients were assessed and well managed. The practice had defined systems, processes and practices to review and assess ongoing risks.
  • The provider was aware of and complied with the requirements of the duty of candour.
  • The practice had created an easy to read pictorial letter and information leaflet for patients with learning disabilities. This assisted the practice when inviting these patients for a health review, to explain treatment and enable the patients to give feedback to GPs and nurses about their care.

The provider should make improvements in the following area:

  • Continue to identify and support carers

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection carried out on 30 September 2015

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced inspection of Springfield Surgery on 30 September 2015. This was a comprehensive inspection under Section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act (2008) as part of our regulatory functions. The practice achieved an overall rating of requires improvement. Specifically, we found the practice to require improvement for providing safe and well-led services. We found it to be good for providing effective, caring and responsive services. Consequently, it requires improvement for providing services for older people; people with long-term conditions; families, children and young people; working age people; people whose circumstances may make them vulnerable and people experiencing poor mental health.

Our key findings were as follows:

  • Systems were in place to identify and respond to concerns about the safeguarding of adults and children.

  • We saw patients receiving respectful treatment from staff. Patients felt they were seen by friendly and helpful staff. Patients reported feeling satisfied with the care and treatment they received.

  • The practice offered a number of services designed to promote patients’ health and wellbeing and prevent the onset of illness.

  • The practice acted upon best practice guidance to further improve patient care.

  • The management and meeting structure ensured that appropriate clinical decisions were reached and action was taken.

  • Systems to ensure the appropriate management of medicines were lacking or not fully implemented.

  • Some systems designed to assess the risk of and to prevent, detect and control the spread of infection were lacking or not fully implemented.

  • Some systems designed to assess, monitor, mitigate risks to and improve the quality and safety of services for patients were lacking.

There were areas of practice where the provider needs to make improvements.

Importantly, the provider must:

  • Ensure an appropriate system is in place for the safe use and management of medicines and prescriptions, including the dispensing of controlled drugs.

  • Ensure that systems designed to assess the risk of and to prevent, detect and control the spread of infection are fully implemented.

  • Ensure that the processes for recording action and learning points and reviewing the effectiveness of any action taken in relation to reported incidents and events are sufficient. Ensure staff are made aware of the decisions made and any changes in practice required.

  • Ensure a plan of action to control and resolve risks identified by health and safety related risk assessments is completed.

In addition the provider should:

  • Ensure that the staff yet to complete safeguarding, equality and diversity and other essential training do so.
  • Ensure there is a programme of repeated (full cycle) clinical audit.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice