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Millrise Medical Practice Good

Reports


Review carried out on 15 November 2019

During an annual regulatory review

We reviewed the information available to us about Millrise Medical Practice on 15 November 2019. We did not find evidence of significant changes to the quality of service being provided since the last inspection. As a result, we decided not to inspect the surgery at this time. We will continue to monitor this information about this service throughout the year and may inspect the surgery when we see evidence of potential changes.

Inspection carried out on 22 May 2017

During an inspection looking at part of the service

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We previously carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Millrise Medical Practice on 27 July 2016. The overall rating for the practice was good with requires improvement in providing safe services. The full comprehensive report from the inspection on the 27 July 2016 can be found by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for Millrise Medical Practice on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

This inspection was an announced focused inspection carried out on 22 May 2017 to confirm that the practice had carried out their plan to meet the legal requirements in relation to the breaches in regulations that we identified in our previous inspection on 27July 2016. This report covers our findings in relation to those requirements and also additional improvements made since our last inspection.

Overall the practice is now rated as good.

Our key findings were as follows:

  • The provider had developed a recorded system to receive and act on alerts about medicines that may affect patients’ safety.

  • The provider had implemented a consistent system for checking that monitoring for patients who took long term medicines on a shared care basis had been provided before issuing prescriptions.

  • An updated fire risk assessment was in place and weekly testing of the fire alarm was undertaken in line with best practice guidance.

  • The provider had improved the identification of patients who were also carers resulting in an increase to 2.4% of the practice population. There was a good range of information available to carers and they were also offered annual health checks.

  • The provider had revised their protocol for requesting home visits. The new procedure ensured that decisions about the urgency of a home visit were made by the on-call GP.

  • Complainants were made aware of the avenues of escalating their complaint within the practice’s response letters should they not be satisfied with the outcome of their complaint. However, not all patients spoken with were aware of how to make a complaint and the complaint leaflets were not readily accessible.

  • Patients commented that they were happy with the service provided. They told us that there were a range of appointments available to them and they could get an appointment when they needed one.

  • Patients felt that staff were helpful and friendly and treated them with dignity, compassion and respect.

  • The practice was actively recruiting clinical staff to fill the vacant GP positions and was open to exploring new ways of working.

However, there was still one area of practice where the provider could make improvements.

The provider should:

Make sure patients are aware of the complaint procedure and ensure complaints forms are readily available to patients.

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice

Inspection carried out on 27/07/2016

During a routine inspection

Letter from the Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out an announced comprehensive inspection at Millrise Medical Practice on 27 July 2016. Overall the practice is rated as good.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows: [

  • Patients said they were treated with compassion, dignity and respect and they were involved in their care and decisions about their treatment.
  • The practice had good facilities and was well equipped to treat patients and meet their needs.
  • Patients said they found it easy to make an appointment with a named GP and there was continuity of care, with urgent appointments available the same day.
  • There was a clear leadership structure and staff felt supported by the management. The practice proactively sought feedback from staff and patients, which it acted on.
  • The provider was aware of and complied with the requirements of the duty of candour.
  • Most risks were well managed, although action was needed in the areas of acting upon alerts about medicines and the practice fire risk assessment in place.

There were areas of practice where the provider needs to make improvements.

Importantly, the provider must:

  • Implement a recorded system to receive and act on alerts about medicines that may affect patients’ safety.

In addition the provider should:

  • Implement a consistent system for checking that monitoring for patients, who take long term medicines on a shared care basis, has been provided before the medicines are issued.

  • Review the fire alarm testing frequency and the fire risk assessment in place to ensure all risks are mitigated and date control the document to demonstrate compliance with legislative requirements over time.

  • Improve the identification of patients who may be carers.

  • Strengthen the procedure for patients requesting a home visit to include consideration to the urgency of which the visit should be undertaken.

  • Include the avenues of escalation for patients in the written response to complaints.  

Professor Steve Field (CBE FRCP FFPH FRCGP) 

Chief Inspector of General Practice